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Old Nov 24, 2004, 3:28 AM   #1
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I'm just wondering what is a recommended first lens for the 7D since I have never owned a Minolta SLR. The newly introduced 17 - 35 mm F2.8 - F4.0 (D) seems to be very limited span when the competitors have better ones.I hateto change lens. And I don't see it on sale yet.

24-105mm f/3.4--4.5[D] looks like something for me, but I'm wondering if Sigma lens (like the 24-70mm f/2.8 EX Aspherical DG DF)are better than the Minolta ones. What is worse is that there is so few availability of Minolta compatible lenses. Even B&H does not carry suitable Minolta mount Sigma lenses.

And one last complain, I can't even use the $150 rebate to buy a lens at the same time I buy the camera body. What am I going to use in the meantime ?

Could anyone give some advice ? Thanks.
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Old Nov 24, 2004, 8:35 AM   #2
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Well, I'd decide how you're going to be using your lenses first (do you need a brighter lens like the Sigma you're looking at with a constant f/2.8 aperture and is the extra size and weight worth it, etc.). To many users it is worth it (they want/need the extra brightness for lower light, and this lens is actually rated a bit higher than the particular Minolta lens you're looking at since it's not one of the Minolta "G" Series lenses).

Basically, you're comparing one of the better Sigma Lenses (their "EX" line), with one of the normal quality Minolta Lenses (Minolta's "G" series lenses are their best).

Also, keep the crop factor in mind when selecting lenses for a DSLR. Because the sensor in the 7D is smaller than 35mm film, the entire image circle projected by the lens is not used. So, you have what is known as a crop factor (sometimes referred to a focal length multiplier).

What this means is that you must multiply the actual focal length of the lens by 1.5 to get the 35mm equivalent focal length on the 7D (equivalent angle of view). So, a 24-70mm lens would have a 35mm equivalent focal range of 36-105mm on a 7D.

Some good sources of lens ratings are here:

http://www.photozone.de/bindex2.html (you'll see the Minolta lens you're looking at under "slow speed" wide angle zooms, and you'll see the Sigma lens you're looking at under f/2.8 wide angle zooms).

You'll also see some sections with detailed user reviews of lenses, and a database with more user ratings on the main page:

http://www.photozone.de/2Equipment/index.html (note that there is a "detailed user review" of the Sigma you're looking at, too).

Another good source of lens ratings is here:

http://www.photodo.com/nav/prodindex.html

Also, keep in mind that many of the user reviews were made with the lenses mounted on 35mm cameras. So, if you have a bit of corner softness at some focal lengths/apertures with a particular lens, it may not be bad enough to be noticeable ona DSLR model (because of the crop factor).

For 3rd party lenses, I'd ask around about the in theNikon and Canon Lens forums, too (since the 7D is so new, you won't have a lot of feedback in this forum, yet). That way, you'd get a better idea of how a given lens performs on a DSLR. Most 3rd party lenses are available in mounts for Canon, Nikon and Minolta.




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Old Nov 24, 2004, 6:51 PM   #3
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Thank you for your detailed advice. Another problem I have is I can't find the lens I want. eg the Sigma lens is just not available for the Minolta mount. They have it for the canon and Nikon mount. Sigma claims it is available but the shops are not selling it.
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Old Nov 24, 2004, 7:25 PM   #4
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Try the price search engine here ( http://www50.shopping.com ) for lenses you're looking for. Some of the larger vendors like B&H usually carry a wide variety. Here's an example search:

http://www50.shopping.com/xPC-Sigma_...Minolta_Maxxum


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Old Nov 26, 2004, 7:46 AM   #5
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konei wrote:
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...24-105mm f/3.4--4.5[D] looks like something for me, but I'm wondering if Sigma lens...

Could anyone give some advice ? Thanks.
The Sigma lenses are not available in HSM yet for Minolta, so there's really no benefit for chosing them over others. Also because the 7D has 'Anti-Shake' built-in, the need for f/2.8 @ wide angle is no longer as important. Tokina makes excellent lens in this range: Hoya glass, all metal construction, and also a parafocal (eg the focus stays constant throughout the zoom range) design!

http://www.vividlight.com/articles/910.htm :idea:
http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/s...rt=7&thecat=29
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Old Feb 9, 2005, 1:05 PM   #6
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The KonicaMinolta 28-100 D (42-150 equivatent) is an excellent all around lens
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Old May 3, 2006, 12:33 PM   #7
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JimC wrote:
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Also, keep the crop factor in mind when selecting lenses for a DSLR. Because the sensor in the 7D is smaller than 35mm film, the entire image circle projected by the lens is not used. So, you have what is known as a crop factor (sometimes referred to a focal length multiplier).

What this means is that you must multiply the actual focal length of the lens by 1.5 to get the 35mm equivalent focal length on the 7D (equivalent angle of view). So, a 24-70mm lens would have a 35mm equivalent focal range of 36-105mm on a 7D.

I read about the multiplier in the review of the FD7 and am wondering if the multiplierfactor applies to the lens made specifically for digital like the one I got from the Adorama package 28-75mm f/2.8.
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Old May 3, 2006, 1:07 PM   #8
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The KM 28-75mm isn't really made only for digital. It doesn't have a smaller image circle that I'm aware of. It's just optmized for digital.

You should be able to use it on any Minolta 35m Autofocus SLR (Maxxum, Dynax, Alpha).

The 5D kit lens (18-70mm f3.5-5.6 DT Lens) is a made for digital only lens. The DT series lenses from KM have a smaller iimage circle, so that you can use a smaller and lighter lens for the same focal length and brightness. These will vignette at wider focal lengths and apertures on a 35mm SLR.

Lenses are marked by their actual focal length. Focal Length doesn't change based on what type of camera a lens is mounted on, or if the image circle is designed for a camera with a smaller or larger sensor.

Angle of view is what changes based on sensor or film size, not focal length.

If you use a smaller sensor or film size, the angle of view will be narrower (more apparent magnification) for any given focal length.

If you use a larger sensor or film size, the angle of view will be wider (less apparent magnification) for any given focal length.

The only reason to even have a so called crop factor or focal length multiplier is so that users familiar with using lenses on 35mm cameras have a better understanding of how angle of view compares.

If 35mm cameras were not so popular, there would be no need to use them at all.

As for lenses designed specifically for DSLR models, they would behave just like any other lens with the same focal length when used on a 35mm camera from an angle of view perspective.

The only drawback is that some lenses are designed only for cameras with sensors smaller than 35mm film, so you may get vignetting at wider focal lengths and aperures if they can be mounted at all (and some lenses can't be mounted on 35mm cameras because of a physical difference in the mount, for example Canon's EF-S lenses).

With a KM DSLR, for any given focal length, you'd need to use a lens 1.52x longer on a 35mm camera to get the same angle of view.

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Old May 3, 2006, 10:32 PM   #9
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JimC wrote:
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With a KM DSLR, for any given focal length, you'd need to use a lens 1.52x longer on a 35mm camera to get the same angle of view.
So if I understand correctlymy 28-75mm f/2.8. effective acts like a 43mm-114mm.
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Old May 4, 2006, 1:19 AM   #10
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meanstreak wrote:
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So if I understand correctlymy 28-75mm f/2.8. effective acts like a 43mm-114mm.
Just about. 42 - 112.5 mm actually. ;-)
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