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Old Oct 13, 2005, 3:56 PM   #1
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I'm considering buying either the KM5D or the 7D. I'm pretty new to photography (taking a class now) and am not sure which lens would be best for me.

I will be taking mostly snowboarding photos, NYC architecture shots, and indoor club/concert venue shots. I do want to take some real estate shots for our rental home and figure a wide angle would be nice for this.

Can someone explain to me if the lens that comes w/ the 7D would be adequate for wide angle shots or is the 5D a lot better? I am going into B&H on Sunday to pick each one up and handle it . I know that I can purchase the body only and get a separate lens, but is that really necessary for someone w/ not much experience? I'd like to buy the kit and the 7D looks nice w/ that rebate.

thanks,
Amy.
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Old Oct 15, 2005, 11:41 AM   #2
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The 7D is sometimes sold as a kit with a 28-100mm f/3.5-5.6 AF lens.

But, because the sensor is smaller than 35mm film in a DSLR like this, your angle of view is narrower (your lenses appear to be "longer" on most DSLR models).

So, you need to multiply the actual focal length by 1.5x to see how the angle of view compares with the same lens on a 35mm camera.

A 28-100mm lens on a 7D would have the same angle of view as a 42-150mm lens on a 35mm model. 42mm is not very wide for interiors and architecture.

The 5D "kit lens" is an 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 lens. So, it would have the same angle of view as a 27-105mm lens would on a 35mm camera.

That's much better, but it still may not be wide enough for everythingsome camera ownerswant to shoot. So, there are even wider lenses available.

You don't have to buy these cameras as kits, either (both are sold body only without a lens, and these lenses are also sold separately, although the prices are better in the kits).

Quote:
indoor club/concert venue shots
You're going to need a very bright lens in these types of venues. The "kit lenses" are not going to cut it (unless you can use a flash) in most darker venues.

I'd suggest lookingat bright primes (non zoom lenses) for this purpose (28mm f/2, 35mm f/1.4 or f/2, 50mm f/1.4 orf/1.7, etc.).


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Old Oct 15, 2005, 12:36 PM   #3
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┬*Jim - was hoping you'd answer - I've been reading your other responses about these cameras.┬* I'm still learning about lenses and focal lengths┬* - just read the chapter in my textbook - thanks for the reply!
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Old Oct 16, 2005, 10:42 PM   #4
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I use Minolta 5 max several years with set of Sigma lenses.
I spoke with Sigma customer services can i use same lenses for Minolta 5D or 7 annd they recomended sent lenses to upgrate .
Just i what advice from people who use Minolta lenses and sigma.What best option go to upgrate and continue to use Sigma or go to Minolta.lenses more better step.
Second ? may be from another coner
Minolta5/7D with 6 M equval or not capability Olympus 500Evolt with 8 mega.Or Minolta new technology more advance for stable image as Olympus
I am new in digital world sorry about this?
Sincerely stars for coment.

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Old Oct 17, 2005, 7:13 AM   #5
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stars wrote:
Quote:
I use Minolta 5 max several years with set of Sigma lenses.
I spoke with Sigma customer services can i use same lenses for Minolta 5D or 7 annd they recomended sent lenses to upgrate .
Sigma doesn't license the lens mount technology from Minolta (now Konica-Minolta). Instead, they reverse engineered the technology. So, from time to time, you do see a problem requiring some Sigma lenses to be "rechipped" when newer models of Minolta cameras come out.

For example, some Sigma owners needed some of theirlenses rechipped for the Maxxum/Dynax 7 (film not digital). But, usually, most Sigma lenses work fine with newer models unless the lenses areolder versions.

Any manufacturer (Sigma, Minolta, Tamron, Tokina, etc.) has a variety of lenses in various qualities available. If you're happy with your Sigma lenses, there would be no need to change brands and buy new ones (keeping focal length needs in mind). Some of the Sigma lenses are very popular with DSLR owners.

If you did have a compatibility issue with any of them, you could just send them back to Sigma for rechipping (a lot less trouble than buying new ones), like Sigma customer service suggested when you spoke to them.

Just make sure to remember that your lenses will appear to be longer on a DSLR model (1.5x longer), so you may or may not need to get some with different focal lengths, depending on your needs.

Quote:
Second ? may be from another coner
Minolta5/7D with 6 M equval or not capability Olympus 500Evolt with 8 mega.Or Minolta new technology more advance for stable image as Olympus
I am new in digital world sorry about this?

Well... If you ask an Olympus owner, they're probably going to tell you the Olympus is better. If you ask a Konica-Minolta owner, they're probably going to tell you the Konica-Minolta is better.

If you need to shoot inlower light, a camera withrelatively clean higher ISO performance is desirable (to keep shutter speeds faster to preventblur from camera shake or subject movement).

The Olympus models tend to have more noise than the other entry level DSLR models (Nikon D50; Pentax *ist DS, DL; Konica-Minolta Maxxum 5D, Canon Rebel XT). They are using a Kodak sensor that is smaller than the sensor used in the other entry level DSLR models.

As a result, the photosites for each pixel are smaller, too, requiring more light to generate an equivalent signal. That's why it tends to have higher noise compared to the others if you need higher ISO speeds.Not everyone needs higher ISO speed performance though (or minds a bit of loss of detail if you need to try and reduce it using noise reduction tools later).

You'll lose a stop or two of usable higher ISO speed capabiity because it's sensor is noisier, requiring more noise and/or slower shutter speeds for the same lighting conditions and aperture setting.

The lenses Olympus has for this model are good, but the brighter lenses tend to be pricey. Although they do have some f/2 zooms out now, they are expensive compared to the wider variety of choices you'd have in f/2.8 zoom lenses available for the other DSLR models, and you'd need at least a stop brighter lens to match the others with something like the Olympus if you like shooting in lower light.

But, if you aren't going to be in conditions warranting high ISO speeds frequently, then I'd most certainly consider the Olympus models.

Personally, if I were going to buy one of them, I'd look at the 5MP Olympus E-1 instead. It's got professional build quality, including weather sealing, and 5 Megapixels is all most people need anyway (especially given noise considerations trying to make the photosites in the same size sensor smaller for higher resolutions). I think the dynamic range of it's Kodak 5MP sensor is excellent, too.

It's not a speed demon, so also look at that part.

Each user is going to use a camera differently. So, noone choice is right for everyone.

Given that you are already using a Minolta camera, I'd suggest going with a Konica-Minolta DSLR, too. That way, you could share your lenses between them.

I recently got a KM DSLR, too (a 5D), and I didn't even have any Minolta gear before I started buying some a couple of months back. After careful research, I decided that it was the best choice, for me (but, each user will have different needs/preferences in a camera).

From my perspective, antishake with every lens, as well as higher ISO speed ability (as you get with the KM DSLR models) is a combination that's hard to beat for most users' needs, allowing you to get hand held shots that would be virtually impossible with most other cameras.

Mike Johnston (a professional photographer and writer) has some good articles you may want to read, too. He'spretty impressed with his 7D (so much that he devotedsome of hisweekly Sunday Morning Photographer articles to it).You may want to read these:

Catch the Rave!

The Tale told by Two Pictures


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Old Oct 17, 2005, 4:13 PM   #6
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To Jim thank you very much .
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