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Old Apr 26, 2006, 7:15 PM   #11
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would you recommend a 50 mm 1.4 or 1.7 for indoor church shots at a wedding? I dont think my 28-85 f3.5-4.5 will handle it and i'm pretty sure i won't be able to use a flash inside.
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Old Apr 26, 2006, 9:35 PM   #12
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DorkUnderwater wrote:
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would you recommend a 50 mm 1.4 or 1.7 for indoor church shots at a wedding? I dont think my 28-85 f3.5-4.5 will handle it and i'm pretty sure i won't be able to use a flash inside.
It depends on where you're going to shoot from and the conditions at the time of the ceremony (how much ambient light you'll have).

Check with the minister on where you can shoot from (if you can shoot at all). If you can't shoot during the ceremony, you can probably restage someshots afterwards.

As inexpensive as a 50mm f/1.7 is, I'd make sure to have one in your bag.

You may be able to use a zoom instead. You'll need to find out what the lighting is going to be and determine if your equipment is up to the task.

You need to know exactly what to expect before hand (what the conditions will be, where you can shoot from, etc.) so that you'll be better prepared.

It's also about "balance", trying to keep shutter speeds up, noise down, and the appropriate depth of field for the desired results, while telling a story of the wedding via your images. If your focus is off at wide open apertures, expect blurry photos (and the tiny viewfinders in Digital Cameras don't lend themselves well to manual focus if light is very low).

I'm trying to tell you.. you really don't want to walk into this without more experience under your belt. You can't expect to buy a new digital camera and instantly become a wedding photgrapher.Some people act as assistants for years before going into it solo.

I've shot weddingsand my work stinks (and I've got a pretty good understanding of the technical aspects). Doing a good job is a lot more than the technical part.

I would not trust myself to be able to do the job as the primary photographer for a wedding. It takes experience to get good at it and you only get one chance at capturing the moment.

My advise would be to find yourself a local pro and offer to be an assistant, as I suggested to begin with. You don't want to shoot a wedding with no experience under your belt.

If you can't use a flash during the ceremony and the minister wants to restrict where you can take photos from, you need to be prepared. Of course, even if you can use a flash, you might be competing with the guests for vantage point, etc. Be prepared.

Also, what if the lighting is so bad that your lenses won't even focus?

How about lighting for the group shots? How about fill flash outdoors?

What if your equipment malfunctions? It happens, usually at the worst possible time.

Try to shoot some weddings *before* you have to do it as the primary photographer, and be prepared for unforeseen problems.

You're asking a lot of questions about basics for someone that's going to be a paid photographer for someone's wedding.

Sure, you might be able to pull it off. But, a good pro can tell a story with photos that will be appreciated for years to come.



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Old Apr 26, 2006, 11:29 PM   #13
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I didn't see where DorkUnderwater said he's being paid professional fees. Perhaps he's just excercising his hobby at the wedding of a friend or relative. I do this every chance I get- then I send a CD or email some shots to those interested.

On that point, a 50mm 1.4 or 1.7 is a fine choice for indoor use in ambient light. The 1.4 is 1/2 stop brighter and may yield more useable shots. I personally don't think it's worth the extra $100 for 1/2 stop, but it's your money and priorities that matter here. If the wedding is daytime, you may be surprised what you can pull off at f3.5. There is typically not much movement, and all the aftershots are posed (and normally flashes are allowed). The flash is also welcome at the reception most of the time so the actual ceremony shots are the only ones you really need to have a bright lens for. Have fun and good luck.


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Old Apr 26, 2006, 11:52 PM   #14
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Mercury694 wrote:
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I didn't see where DorkUnderwater said he's being paid professional fees. Perhaps he's just excercising his hobby at the wedding of a friend or relative.
Different thread. Feel free to throw in your two cents worth. I've already thrown in mine:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=2


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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:14 AM   #15
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Mercury694 wrote:
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I didn't see where DorkUnderwater said he's being paid professional fees. Perhaps he's just excercising his hobby at the wedding of a friend or relative.
In the thread where he originally asked for help, he said

Hi, I honestly dont know where to post this appropriately, so if you know a better place do tell. I am very close to getting a wedding photo job in late august. They aren't seeking a pro's rates, something less probably. What is the average wedding rate? they also want a photo book.


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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:33 AM   #16
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Old May 3, 2006, 12:33 AM   #17
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I am very happy with the Vivitar Series 1 70-210 2.8-4 lens. It compares very well to any of the other lenses I have tried (and there have been quite a few since I recently have bought up and resold old Minolta equipment). It's quite an underrated lens and costs $79 new on ebay from Cameta Cameras.
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Old May 3, 2006, 2:37 AM   #18
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Recently such a beer can (it is called "Ofenrohr" over here) in mint condition was sold here for a whopping 334€. That's well over 400$ and a new world record.
http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?...%3AIT&rd=1
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Old May 3, 2006, 2:44 AM   #19
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Das ist ja wohl verrueckt!

:?
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Old May 9, 2006, 5:31 AM   #20
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Hi Folks!

My first photo with my 9 years film lens 24-85mm, instead my "Kit" one as Jim suggest me, that instead guard/hold the lens; use it on you 7D body...it's better that the cheap kit...I approve!

Look the amazing results, I have more but don't cognize how to add more of one photo on the same post...maybe; some of you can explicate me in a plain English...please?. I use XP-Pro Pentium 3 computer. Thanks!

Cheers,

Alex 007:|


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