Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Sony Alpha dSLR / Konica Minolta dSLR, Sony SLT

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 2, 2006, 9:09 PM   #11
Member
 
Cavemandude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 62
Default

The auto white balance is not always that bad using the Sunpak 433D, just lookat the pics in my second post on this thread. I actually prefer the auto white balance of the 433D over the 3600HS which has a slight yellowcast.

But when looking at all the pics I have shot using these two flashes in the past couple days, I would have to say more often than not there is some level of blue cast in 433D pics. The 3600HSwillonly occasionally have a slight yellow castbut won'tbe as severe as the blue cast of the 433D when it happens.

Just my opinion,

Randy Wheeler


Cavemandude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 9:23 PM   #12
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

The camera does not know that your using a flash when you use the Sunpak. So, the auto white balance is measuring only ambient light.

If the ambient light is coming from outside (where the color temperature is closer to the flash), then it may be close. If a lot of ambient light is coming from incadescent lighting, you'll probably get a color cast.

I'd switch WB to either Sunny or Flash and give it a try.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 10:21 PM   #13
Member
 
Cavemandude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 62
Default

With the pics I have posted in this thread, just the opposite happened with the Sunpak 433D white balance.

The clown pics had a little incandescent light in the room, no daylight since it was at nightand the white balance was pretty good with only some shots having a slight blue cast.

The dog pics had daylight coming in from a couple windows behind me and those picshad muchstronger blue cast than the clown pics.

According to the color temp chart below doesn't it make sense that the dog pics had a stronger blue cast because the daylight in the room iscloser to ablue color temp than incandescent which is closer to yellow?

I'll try the sunny and flash WB settings next and see what that does.

For reference with this discussion:



1200 K: a candle
2800 K: tungsten lamp (ordinary household bulb), sunrise and sunset
3000 K: studio lamps, photofloods,
5000 K: electronic flash, average daylight. A designation of D50 stands for "Daylight 5000K" and is the most common standard for professional light booths for photography, graphic arts, and other purposes.
6000 K: bright midday sun
7000 K: lightly overcast sky
8000 K: hazy sky
10,000 K: heavily overcast sky

Randy Wheeler

Cavemandude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 11:38 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

I just tried the "Flash" WB setting with the Sunpak and they come out way too yellow. Daylight works a lot better, but is not much diiferent from the AWB setting. But depending on the cirumstances one could probably switch to the "Flash" setting whenever the pictures turn out too blue.

Here are my comparisons.

1: Minolta 3600 HS AWB


Attached Images
 
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 11:39 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

Sunpak 433 D AWB


Attached Images
 
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 11:40 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

Sunpak "Flash" Setting (it overexposed a little actually compared to the Minolta flash because of the white center I guess. In the picture above Istepped downabout 2/3f-stops).See how yellow it got?





Attached Images
 
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 11:43 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

Sunpak "Daylight" Setting.


Attached Images
 
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2006, 11:44 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

Cavemandude wrote:
Quote:
With the pics I have posted in this thread, just the opposite happened with the Sunpak 433D white balance.

The clown pics had a little incandescent light in the room, no daylight since it was at nightand the white balance was pretty good with only some shots having a slight blue cast.

The dog pics had daylight coming in from a couple windows behind me and those picshad muchstronger blue cast than the clown pics.

According to the color temp chart below doesn't it make sense that the dog pics had a stronger blue cast because the daylight in the room iscloser to ablue color temp than incandescent which is closer to yellow?

I'll try the sunny and flash WB settings next and see what that does.

For reference with this discussion:



1200 K: a candle
2800 K: tungsten lamp (ordinary household bulb), sunrise and sunset
3000 K: studio lamps, photofloods,
5000 K: electronic flash, average daylight. A designation of D50 stands for "Daylight 5000K" and is the most common standard for professional light booths for photography, graphic arts, and other purposes.
6000 K: bright midday sun
7000 K: lightly overcast sky
8000 K: hazy sky
10,000 K: heavily overcast sky

Randy Wheeler

Thanks, Randy. that;s a very handy reference.
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2006, 12:26 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
rduve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,504
Default

Based on my experiences, there is no reason to spend $400 for the 5600, and I would not consider the 3600 because I can't swivel it in vertical mode. I am very happy with the Sunpak.
rduve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 3, 2006, 12:34 AM   #20
Member
 
Cavemandude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 62
Default

I think we got similar white balance results with both flashes. In your first two pics, the 3600HShas aslight yellow cast and the 433D hasa slight blue cast. Don't know which one is more accurate though.

Now you exposure seems to not be doing as well as mine is with the 433D. I've been using f8 aperture, ISO 100, 1/160 shutter with multi-segmentor spot metering and get excellent results with little or no overexposure. Image stabilization is on also.

Withyour pics, you have used f5.6, ISO 200, 1/125 shutter and center weighted metering to start with.

Are you sure you have the manual settings on the back of the 433D set to 5.6 and 200 to match your camera? I've made this mistake before. If you have the settings correct then maybe you should try the camera settings I'm using and see if that makes a difference.

Randy Wheeler


Cavemandude is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:53 PM.