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Old Jul 9, 2006, 10:18 AM   #11
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Experiment. It doesn't cost you anything to develop like film does. ;-)

Take the same shot using more than one setting and see how they compare.

I've found that Auto White Balance is usually pretty good in most outdoor conditions. From time to time, I may switch to a preset or custom white balance in unusual conditions (for example, taking photos of people in a pool where the blue pool liners and water reflections can negatively impact White Balance).

In artificial lighting, it's much tougher for a camera's auto white balance to get it right. So, I usually go to a preset or custom white balance there.

If you shoot raw, you have more control over it later.

A JPEG image has already been processed by the camera. So, it's converting the image from the sensor and applying RGB multipliers for the white balance, sharpening the image, applying tone/contrast curves and more.

RAW is unprocessed data from the sensor. So, you don't have to let the camera do everything in advance, where you may find the settings you used were not optimum for the conditions, since you can change things like white balance later (as well as sharpening, contrast, saturation and more). As a general rule, you can get more dynamic range out of an image shooting in raw, too (depending on the raw converter being used).

Here's an article that gives a simple explanation of raw:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...aw-files.shtml

Here are some popular raw converters. Some are free, and the rest usually have trial versions you can download to see how you like them.

http://www.dyxum.com/darkroom/converters/list.asp
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 4:27 PM   #12
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I've read that RAW also has more color depth (12 or 16 bit vs 8 bit perhaps?) than jpeg. I haven't really taken advantage of this or made any real effort to learn as I've pretty much been shooting jpegs (due to laziness on my part) and I'm now comfortable enough to start looking into RAW software. I did download RSE and PSE but I'm certainly new at post processing. I may need to look into another forum for that...

Hmm, way off topic. I didn't mean to suggest that those settings had no other use but for near tone shots, but bright or dim light alone may not demand their use. I don't believe my 7d has those settings, I think I'm supposed to know how to do that myself. :lol:
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 4:39 PM   #13
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The 7D has Zone Matching. The effective ISO speed is slightly different (Low Key is ISO 100 and Hi Key is ISO 250).

It's implemented a bit differently on the 7D. If you turn on Zone Matching under Custom Menu 4, your ISO speed button lets you select between them.


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Old Jul 10, 2006, 10:51 PM   #14
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JimC you always been a great help yo me, especially when i am lost, but what i just read sounds like greek, i really need an explaination on raw in lamans terms and not in scientific language:?
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 9:18 AM   #15
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JimC wrote:
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The 7D has Zone Matching. The effective ISO speed is slightly different (Low Key is ISO 100 and Hi Key is ISO 250).

It's implemented a bit differently on the 7D. If you turn on Zone Matching under Custom Menu 4, your ISO speed button lets you select between them.

If I turn on zone matching will it affect other things or just give me two new ISO settings?
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 9:21 AM   #16
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I think it will replace your existing ISO settings while turned on with a 7D, and you lose the ability to change some things (I think contrast might be one of them).

The 5D is implemented differently (all ISO speeds including Zone Matching are still available when you press the ISO button, and you can still change other image processing parameters).


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 9:23 AM   #17
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dafiryde wrote:
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JimC you always been a great help yo me, especially when i am lost, but what i just read sounds like greek, i really need an explaination on raw in lamans terms and not in scientific language:?
Think of raw as an unprocessed negative. It's the data directly from the sensor. It has not gone through any kind of processing at all yet. IOW, it's not "developed". It's your digital negative.

So, rather than the camera trying to process it in a split second between photos, you can let a powerful PC process later instead.

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Old Jul 11, 2006, 10:11 AM   #18
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JimC wrote:
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I think it will replace your existing ISO settings while turned on with a 7D, and you lose the ability to change some things (I think contrast might be one of them).

The 5D is implemented differently (all ISO speeds including Zone Matching are still available when you press the ISO button, and you can still change other image processing parameters).


After seeing your reply, I realized I had a copy of Friedman's book on my PC. According to his book, on the 7D it reassigns the ISO button so that instead of changing ISO it will change the Zone matching setting. I guess what I don't understand about that is how do you change ISO then? Perhaps it takes your existing setting and applys zone matching or uses one of two choices like the 5D. If that is the case, I like the way the 5D handles it better. I'll check to see what it does when I get home. It's too bad Sony doesn't update the firmware some more to cover what was improved in the 5D.


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 10:13 AM   #19
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
dafiryde wrote:
Quote:
JimC you always been a great help yo me, especially when i am lost, but what i just read sounds like greek, i really need an explaination on raw in lamans terms and not in scientific language:?
Think of raw as an unprocessed negative. It's the data directly from the sensor. It has not gone through any kind of processing at all yet. IOW, it's not "developed". It's your digital negative.

So, rather than the camera trying to process it in a split second between photos, you can let a powerful PC process later instead.

Is the raw image unaffected by white balance settings also? I took some pictures the other day with the wrong setting but didn't check the raw image to see if they came out bad.


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 10:20 AM   #20
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meanstreak wrote:
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After seeing your reply, I realized I had a copy of Friedman's book on my PC. According to his book, on the 7D it reassigns the ISO button so that instead of changing ISO it will change the Zone matching setting. I guess what I don't understand about that is how do you change ISO then
Your Zone Matching is your ISO speed. You don't have any other choices for ISO speed, other than the two Zone Matching options if you want to use Zone Matching. That's true for both cameras (you can't apply zone matching to any ISO speed you want -- that's not how it works).

That's why I said this earlier in the thread:

JimC wrote:
Quote:
The 7D has Zone Matching. The effective ISO speed is slightly different (Low Key is ISO 100 and Hi Key is ISO 250).

It's implemented a bit differently on the 7D. If you turn on Zone Matching under Custom Menu 4, your ISO speed button lets you select between them.
With the 5D, the effectiver ISO speeds are slightly different. Low Key Zone Matching has an effective ISO speed of ISO 80, and High Key Zone Matching has an effective ISO speed of ISO 200.

On the 5D, you don't have to worry about using a custom setting to make your ISO Speed Button work with them. They're already available on the ISO speed selection screen (Lo80 AND Hi200) after you press the ISO button.


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