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Old Jul 11, 2006, 11:36 AM   #21
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meanstreak wrote:
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Is the raw image unaffected by white balance settings also? I took some pictures the other day with the wrong setting but didn't check the raw image to see if they came out bad.
The data captured from the sensor has not been processed. So, your white balance settings have not been applied.

You don't even have RGB color values associated with each pixel yet in a raw file. Each photosite in a bayer type sensor (used by most digital cameras) is only senstive to one color (red, green or blue), because of filters used over them, and most sensors have twice as many photosites sensitive to green.

The raw conversion algorithms take the values from the red, green, and blue photosites and combine them via sophisticated interpolation techniques so that all 3 colors are stored for each pixel.

The raw file has not combined the photosites in any way.

That's what the raw conversion process does. There are a number of different algorithms used, and some are better than others. You can see some of the common ones discussed here (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader):

http://www.ece.gatech.edu/research/labs/MCCL/pubs/dwnlds/bahadir05.pdf


But, the White Balance settings you use are still stored in the metadata (part of the header) in the raw file.

So, many raw converters can apply the white balance the camera was using at the time you convert the images if desired. This is known in most converters as the "as shot" white balance.

Basically, it's a set of RGB multipliers stored in the metadata that are used to change the red, green and blue values associated with each pixel, after they're combined via the demosaic process, so that the colors look right for the temperature of the light you were shooting in. But, you don't have to use the as shot white balance during the conversion. You can change if if desired with most raw converters.


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 1:25 PM   #22
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JimC wrote:
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After seeing your reply, I realized I had a copy of Friedman's book on my PC. According to his book, on the 7D it reassigns the ISO button so that instead of changing ISO it will change the Zone matching setting. I guess what I don't understand about that is how do you change ISO then
Your Zone Matching is your ISO speed. You don't have any other choices for ISO speed, other than the two Zone Matching options if you want to use Zone Matching. That's true for both cameras (you can't apply zone matching to any ISO speed you want -- that's not how it works).

That's why I said this earlier in the thread:

JimC wrote:
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The 7D has Zone Matching. The effective ISO speed is slightly different (Low Key is ISO 100 and Hi Key is ISO 250).

It's implemented a bit differently on the 7D. If you turn on Zone Matching under Custom Menu 4, your ISO speed button lets you select between them.
With the 5D, the effectiver ISO speeds are slightly different. Low Key Zone Matching has an effective ISO speed of ISO 80, and High Key Zone Matching has an effective ISO speed of ISO 200.

On the 5D, you don't have to worry about using a custom setting to make your ISO Speed Button work with them. They're already available on the ISO speed selection screen (Lo80 AND Hi200) after you press the ISO button.

Thanks Jim I found it in the 7D Book. It is not as functionally accessable as the 5D since you can only select between hi and low once in zone matching mode. Not a major issue since I would say zone matching is used mostly by exception rather than the norm,but I like the way the 5D handles it. I now wonder if I can configure it intoone of the custom memory settings.




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Old Jul 12, 2006, 7:05 PM   #23
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Jim C wrote

Think of raw as an unprocessed negative. It's the data directly from the sensor. It has not gone through any kind of processing at all yet. IOW, it's not "developed". It's your digital negative.

So, rather than the camera trying to process it in a split second between photos, you can let a powerful PC process later instead.

gona give it a try later, do i down load the pics as normal to the kodak program

and thanks about the lens advice, ordered the tamron 28-300 today



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Old Jul 12, 2006, 7:49 PM   #24
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I don't know anything about a "Kodak Program".

I don't use any program to download my pics. I simply copy them from the CompactFlash card and paste them into a new folder on my PC.

Most cameras and card readers show up under "My Computer", and behave just like any other drive. So, you can click on them, see the folders, click on a folder, select the files (I use "Select All"), copy them (using Edit, Copy), then navigate to a folder on your PC and use Edit, Paste to copy them there.

I keep a folder called Photos on my PC. Then, I have subfolders underneath it labled by date using a yyyymmdd date format.

I like to use folder names with 8 characters or less for better compability with older DOS programs and utilities. That's my system. lol

I was using a batch file for a while that I had setup to prompt me for a date. But, I've just been using Windows Explorer to copy them lately.

As for programs designed to copy them for you, you'd have to try them to find out. Some may not recognize files with anything other than a jpeg extension.

Are you talking about Kodak software included with your camera? I do remember something about Kodak Easyshare being included with some Konica Minolta products in some regions. I thought that was pretty strange. lol

But, I've never loaded the software that came with my camera. So, I don't know what they included.

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Old Jul 12, 2006, 11:23 PM   #25
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when i bought my D5 the installation disc came with a kodak program
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Old Jul 12, 2006, 11:37 PM   #26
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I've heard that. I still think that's pretty odd (that Konica Minolta included a Kodak product with their cameras in some regions).

You'll have to try it and see if it recogonizes them or not. I've never loaded the Kodak Easyshare Software before.

I have used a number of programs that can recognize when you attach cameras or plug in media to USB Card readers and copy the images for you (even Windows has the ability to do that built in).

But, automatically trying to copy my images is the first thing I normally disable in those types of applications when I do install them (since I prefer to copy the images myself, using a folder structure that I like better).


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Old Jul 13, 2006, 8:18 AM   #27
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JimC wrote:
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I've heard that. I still think that's pretty odd (that Konica Minolta included a Kodak product with their cameras in some regions).


Jim, it came on my Dimage Master Lite disk also. Maybe not a regional thing but something KM added late in the game? I got my camera 3/26/06.
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Old Jul 13, 2006, 8:24 AM   #28
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Interesting. I've never loaded DiMAGE Lite.

I guess I really should get around to trying it one of these days. I guess that subconciously I put it in the same category as most camera manufacturer's software -- not good enough to waste my time on.

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Old Jul 13, 2006, 9:07 AM   #29
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cope wrote:
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JimC wrote:
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I've heard that. I still think that's pretty odd (that Konica Minolta included a Kodak product with their cameras in some regions).


Jim, it came on my Dimage Master Lite disk also. Maybe not a regional thing but something KM added late in the game? I got my camera 3/26/06.
That program has been around awhile and came as a freebe with a lot of products including scanners. Itreally isn't about packaging a Kodak product with a KM product and KM worried about losing business. It just sounds funny to us because it says Kodak but no different than the freebe or trial products from Adobe, Macromedia, Ulead, etc., etc. that come packaged with computers and other electronics.


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Old Nov 20, 2006, 7:58 PM   #30
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To revive this old thread, I am still confused on when to use either the Lo80 or the Hi200. What would be recommended for a lighting situation like in this shot where I neither want blown highlights nor shadowsobscuring my kids' faces. And if the Lo80 is best for darker scenes, wouldn't a higher ISO be more useful, with the opposite being true for Hi200? Can't wrap my wits around how to use these settings, but want to optimize them.

Rainer


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