Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Sony Alpha dSLR / Konica Minolta dSLR, Sony SLT

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 27, 2006, 2:00 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

I have a Minolta 7000 Maxuum film camera and would like to know if the filters and lenses I have (several) will fit the new digital slr's

Is the old film camera worth messing with anymore?

Thanks for any info.
Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 27, 2006, 3:00 PM   #2
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yes, the lenses & filters will work. The camera is worth keeping as long as you want to pay to have film developed.
  Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2007, 9:52 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

Whoa, I kinda lost track of this post.
What current cameras will my old lens fit?

May be a decent way into a DSLR.


Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22, 2007, 10:52 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

No matches ???
Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22, 2007, 11:04 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 107
Default

As long as the are Minolta AF lenses they will fit the discontinued KM 5D and 7D and the new Sony Alpha. If you didn't know, Sony bought out Konica Minolta, but will continue using the Minolta lens mount so all old AF leses will fit.

If you already have some decent glass it is a very good way to get into a DSLR. That's what I did and I'm very happy with my KM 5D.

DrChris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22, 2007, 11:47 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

Thanks DrChris, I will definately look into that.
Are the KM5d and the 7d Konico or Minolta branded cameras


Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 2:34 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

Just looked in the old Maxxum camera case and found

1 ea. Minolta AF 70-210 lens

1 ea. Minolta AF 35-70 lens

1 ea. Minolta AF 50 lens

1 ea. Minolta Maxxum 2800 AF Flash unit.

And a bunch of filters for different affects.

Would be super if all this stuff coulb be put back into service.


Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 6:54 AM   #8
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

The flash won't won't..

The flash system was redesigned for digital (and the hotshoe changed between the 7000 and 7000i series anyway to a proprietary design with more features).

But, the lenses will work. They'll appear to be about 50% longer on a DSLR than they will on your film camera (you'll have a narrower angle of view, giving you more apparent magnification). For example, that 50mm f/1.7 will give you the same angle of view that you'd have using a 75mm lens on a 35mm camera (50mm x 1.5 = 75mm). But, they'll work just fine and you'll have Autofocus, as well as Anti-Shake with them on a Konica Minolta or Sony DSLR.

Most other entry level DSLR models will work the same way (lenses will appear to be longer on digital). That's because the sensors in most DSLR models are smaller than 35mm film. That's also the reason that most "kit lenses" you'll see with a DSLR start out at around 17 or 18mm (because they'll appear to be longer on a DSLR and you may want something wider than the 28 or 35mm most zooms designed for 35mm cameras start out at).

Quote:
Are the KM5d and the 7d Konico or Minolta branded cameras?
They are Konica Minolta branded cameras. Konica and Minolta merged to form Konica Minolta and introduced a number of cameras under the Konica Minolta brand including two DSLR models (Maxxum 5D, 7D).

Those two DSLR models (Konica Minolta 5D, 7D) use the Minolta Autofocus Lens mount (a.k.a., Maxxum, Dynax, Alpha, Minolta A Mount). Note that these are discontinued models now.

Then, Sony purchased the camera manufacturing part of Konica Minolta last year (Konica Minolta is no longer in the camera business). Sony launched it's own brand of Digital SLR models that can use the Minolta AF Lens mount, based on the technology they purchased from Konica Minolta. The first model was the Sony DSLR-A100 (a.k.a., Alpha 100). It's in stores now and was mostly based on the Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D.

Sony has announced that work is underway on two more higher end DSLR models now, too. We should see some final details and product announcements on at least one of them within the next few months. Sony intends to be a major player in the DSLR market (which is why they purchased the camera manufacturing from Konica Minolta). Sony is already the largest producers of sensors used in Digital Cameras (Konica Minolta, Nikon and Pentax DSLR models use Sony sensors, and a number of non-DSLR models from Canon, Nikon, Pentax and others are also using Sony sensors).

So, you could use your existing lenses on a Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D, Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D or Sony DSLR-A100

You'd also have anti-shake with all of your lenses with any of these camera bodies.

You'll find that those lenses are well liked by Konica Minolta and Sony DSLR owners, too. The two zooms are probably the constant f/4 lenses (35-70mm f/4, 70-210mm f/4) and they're quite popular (especially the 70-200mm f/4, which is affectionately referred to as the "Beercan").

The 50mm f/1.7 is also quite popular for low light use, portraits, and more. That 35-70mm f/4 Macro isn't quite as popular (mostly because the focal range isn't as useful as some of the newer lenses that start out wider, since it would have the same angle of view as a 52-105mm lens on a 35mm camera, since lenses will appear to be 1.5x longer on a DSLR).

But, it's a very sharp little lens on a DSLR. I've got one. I bought a used Maxxum 7000 camera package just to get that lens for use on my Maxxum 5D (and I bought another Maxxum 7000 camera package to get the 50mm f/1.7 that the seller was including with it). lol

Any Minolta Autofocus (a.k.a., Minolta A Mount, Alpha, Dynax, Maxxum) lens will work on a Sony or Konica Minolta DSLR model, including the 3 lenses that you already have, and you'd have the benefits of Anti-Shake (or what Sony calls SSS for Super Steady Shot) with all of them.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 11:40 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 750
Default

Jim, Thank you for the most informative and complete response I think I have ever had to a question. You cleared up a lot of my confusion and raised a few more questions.

As you can see in my signature, I have a Koday P712 which has a 12x zoom, 432mm max equiv.
How does that zoom compare to the Sony A100 with 70-200 lens. If I understand your statement regarding "appearing longer" the 70-200 would look like a 105-300mm. Does this value change using it on a digital camera vs the older 35mm SLR camera.
Lastly, at least for now, I have in this mix some filters by Toyo.
Close up #1, #2, and #4.
A cross 6x whatever that is, and a circular polarizer.
Are these useable on the digital camera?

Thanks again Jim. I think I will now try and find some reviews on the A100.



Flying Fossil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23, 2007, 11:55 AM   #10
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Right, your 70-200mm lens on a KM or Sony DSLR would give you the same angle of view that you'd have using a 105-300mm lens on a 35mm camera.

Basically, the smaller the film or sensor, the narrower the angle of view (more apparent magnifcation) for a given focal length. Or, the larger the sensor or film size, the wider the angle of view for a given focal length. (less apparent magnification).

You see the same thing with film. A given focal length lens on a 35mm film camera will appear to be much longer (narrower angle of view) compared to the same focal length lens on a medium format (i.e., 645) camera, or even wider if used on cameras with larger film sizes..

The same type of thing is true for your Kodak. It's sensor is *much* smaller than the ones used in the KM or Sony DSLR models. So, you'll have a much narrower angle of view for any given focal length. The actual focal length range of the lens on it is 6-72mm, *not* 36-432mm.

With non-DSLR models, the manufacturers usually give the "35mm equivalent" focal range, versus the actual focal range. That helps 35mm camera users understand how the zoom ranges compare. So, Kodak published 36-432mm as the "equivalent" focal range for the lens on your model (even though it's really a much shorter 6-72mm lens).

But, with a DSLR model that has a sensor smaller than 35mm film (in the case of the KM or Sony DSLR models, an APS-C size sensor is used), you'll need to do the math yourself if you want to see how a given focal length lens compares to using it on a 35mm camera for angle of view purposes.

Yes, you can use your filters, too.



JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:25 PM.