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Old Nov 2, 2006, 1:59 AM   #1
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Can any owner of the R1 recommend a camera case other than the Sony one please. I want it to fit just the camera on its own , Not the hood flash ect , just as a walk around small as possible bag , So far ive looked at lowpro 140 , and Crumpler Pizza large , same as USA Crumpler4 million dollar bag im told , different name in uk but same bag ,I have not tried these two bags only dealers ideas on what might fit so not sure how they fit the R1, maybe some other make of bag / case Tamrac ? ect or whatever , I would like it so that the lens does NOT face down worried if i drop the case the lenses nose will be first to hit the floor many thanks for any advice.:homey:FOR ME PLEASE! THANKYOU.
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 9:03 AM   #2
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I use the Lowepro Toploader 65AW.
It fits the camera nicely (with hood), has a front pouch that will hold a flash (Promaster 5550), a spare battery and a few other small items. And it comes with a raincover.
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Old Nov 2, 2006, 11:40 PM   #3
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Hi. I got my R2 two weeks ago and have been looking around for a case. I had requirements similar to yours and I finally chose this one:


www.lowepro.com/Products/Toploading/designed_digital/Rezo_TLZ_20.aspx

The TLZ 20 is a top loading holster case which comes with shoulder strap and loop on the back to attach to belt. It does NOT come with internal velcro dividers. This sill be important later.

The Camera fits snugly yet there is enough room to easily grasp the hand-hold.
Potential downside is that the weight of the camera is on the lens as there are no internal dividers which can be used to support it from the 'shoulder' .... the body.

I happened to have quite a long divider o my own from another case and was able to test it in the shop. The internal fabfic of the TLZ 20 is exactly what is needed to accept and clig on to Velcro so I was able to use my own.

The R" is asymetrical. I have the long divider going vertically down the case so that it snugly holds thelens along the left side of the case and goes high enough to catch the camera body to prevent thelens from touching the bottom. It slides smoothly in and out and if walking around with the top of the case open, I can move confidently and bend down and up again and the camera is secure. It is not as 'deep' as some cases, and so does not hang out so far when on the belt loop.

The belt loop, by the way is 'quick release .. .a stiff flap which is then secured with velcro and a popper button. When attaching to the belt, it is actually ber simple to slide the flap, wrestle the popper and that means the velcro alignment is then perfect and the thing will not come undun unless i psitively Upop it.

The only downside is that the top opens 'toward' me when on my belt . I also stiched some velcro as a secondary fastening. The fastening clip it secure, but takes me two hands to close or open the bag.

So .. that's the story of the case that I chose.


Last week when I was researching for cses, then this thread on the Digital Camera Review forum was very useful indeed:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...wepro&qf=m


All the best to you as you find a case

Glyn Powell
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Old Nov 3, 2006, 3:07 PM   #4
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Glyn2 wrote: Thanks im trying to find an owner of the perfect size / fit this bag seems to be not Quite there but thanks .
Quote:
Hi. I got my R2 two weeks ago and have been looking around for a case. I had requirements similar to yours and I finally chose this one:


http://www.lowepro.com/Products/Topl...zo_TLZ_20.aspx

The TLZ 20 is a top loading holster case which comes with shoulder strap and loop on the back to attach to belt. It does NOT come with internal velcro dividers. This sill be important later.

The Camera fits snugly yet there is enough room to easily grasp the hand-hold.
Potential downside is that the weight of the camera is on the lens as there are no internal dividers which can be used to support it from the 'shoulder' .... the body.

I happened to have quite a long divider o my own from another case and was able to test it in the shop. The internal fabfic of the TLZ 20 is exactly what is needed to accept and clig on to Velcro so I was able to use my own.

The R" is asymetrical. I have the long divider going vertically down the case so that it snugly holds thelens along the left side of the case and goes high enough to catch the camera body to prevent thelens from touching the bottom. It slides smoothly in and out and if walking around with the top of the case open, I can move confidently and bend down and up again and the camera is secure. It is not as 'deep' as some cases, and so does not hang out so far when on the belt loop.

The belt loop, by the way is 'quick release .. .a stiff flap which is then secured with velcro and a popper button. When attaching to the belt, it is actually ber simple to slide the flap, wrestle the popper and that means the velcro alignment is then perfect and the thing will not come undun unless i psitively Upop it.

The only downside is that the top opens 'toward' me when on my belt . I also stiched some velcro as a secondary fastening. The fastening clip it secure, but takes me two hands to close or open the bag.

So .. that's the story of the case that I chose.


Last week when I was researching for cses, then this thread on the Digital Camera Review forum was very useful indeed:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...wepro&qf=m


All the best to you as you find a case

Glyn Powell
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Old Nov 5, 2006, 2:52 AM   #5
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How about Crumpler looks like the top can let in dust/ rain not sealed but nice looking ,or some thing from Sony i suppose do they do a perfect fit bag? Any more advice out there .
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Old Nov 5, 2006, 9:08 AM   #6
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May be you should take a fresh and broader look on bags.
After all camera is not a gun and you can live without holster type bag? What if it could be duffel style bag where camera lives in natural way bottom down? Could it be something like this?

http://www.kata-bags.com/Item.asp?pi...d=4&ProdLine=4
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Old Nov 5, 2006, 9:59 AM   #7
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s_grins wrote:
Quote:
May be you should take a fresh and broader look on bags.
After all camera is not a gun and you can live without holster type bag? What if it could be duffel style bag where camera lives in natural way bottom down? Could it be something like this?

http://www.kata-bags.com/Item.asp?pi...amp;ProdLine=4
Thanks but its a hard box thingy are you sure this would fit?,:idea: I think crumpler are soft any one use a crumpler? and what one please .
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Old Nov 5, 2006, 4:00 PM   #8
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I bought duffel type bag for R1 (digital concept brand) and I'm very pleased with it. I think, camera loves it too.
The link I've posted suggests that you may, if you want, to search amidst other brands and styles too. BTW, KATA has large selection, not the only one you saw. Just click links you can see on their page
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Old Nov 6, 2006, 12:47 AM   #9
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OK - this idea is way at the bottom of the cool scale, but I thought I'd throw in my two cents anyway.

A long time ago, my photography mentor, a globe-trotting photojournalist, told me that toting equipment in what was obviously a fancy name-brand camera bag not only screamed tourist (or to him, even worse ... weekend photographer); but was also an open invitation to every thief in the neighborhood. He thought of himself as a "purist," I thought he was an incurable snob and terribly old-fashioned. I ignored him; after all, I had just purchased my first "real" camera (an autofocus Canon EOS 630 SLR); so of course I went out and bought the fanciest, most expensive pro bag I could afford. Hot mama ... hot camera ... hot bag ... I was smokin'!

And yes ... you guessed it ... 'tho he was dead wrong about Canon's new fangled EOS line being just a passing phase; he was dead right about the camera bag. Within two weeks, I was mugged; my camera was gone forever; and I spent a painful night in the emergency room with a broken wrist.

Since then, I have become a big believer in low profile bags for my cameras and computers. In fact, the less it looks like a camera or laptop bag, the more I like it. My all-time favorite equipment tote was made out of an old diaper bag; comfortable to carry; plenty of pockets, lots of padding and virtually theft-proof. (All of you new-age, enlightened he-men will have no problem carrying a diaper bag, right?)

My advice? The more expensive the equipment, (the cost of the R-1, even now, isn't exactly pocket change) ... then the worse your camera bag should look. Currently, I use a well-worn self-customized leather Healthy Back bag from Ameribags. I scuffed it up as much as possible; waterproofed it; then lined the inside with temperpedic foam to cuddle my equipment. (The foam adds a bit to the weight, but the design of the Ameribag reduces the perceived weight by 30%, so it's still very comfortable). There are plenty of compartments for filters, extra batteries, etc., and there is a special pouch on the strap for my cell so I don't have to dig for it.

The moral of this story, young grasshoppers, is this: if you can't find one you like ... make your own! Thieves won't give you a second glance; and your back, pocketbook, and camera will thank you. And it just might save your life (or at least, save you from a broken wrist!) MamaRia
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Old Nov 6, 2006, 2:51 AM   #10
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RiaRia wrote:
Quote:
OK - this idea is way at the bottom of the cool scale, but I thought I'd throw in my two cents anyway.

A long time ago, my photography mentor, a globe-trotting photojournalist, told me that toting equipment in what was obviously a fancy name-brand camera bag not only screamed tourist (or to him, even worse ... weekend photographer); but was also an open invitation to every thief in the neighborhood. He thought of himself as a "purist," I thought he was an incurable snob and terribly old-fashioned. I ignored him; after all, I had just purchased my first "real" camera (an autofocus Canon EOS 630 SLR); so of course I went out and bought the fanciest, most expensive pro bag I could afford. Hot mama ... hot camera ... hot bag ... I was smokin'!

And yes ... you guessed it ... 'tho he was dead wrong about Canon's new fangled EOS line being just a passing phase; he was dead right about the camera bag. Within two weeks, I was mugged; my camera was gone forever; and I spent a painful night in the emergency room with a broken wrist.

Since then, I have become a big believer in low profile bags for my cameras and computers. In fact, the less it looks like a camera or laptop bag, the more I like it. My all-time favorite equipment tote was made out of an old diaper bag; comfortable to carry; plenty of pockets, lots of padding and virtually theft-proof. (All of you new-age, enlightened he-men will have no problem carrying a diaper bag, right?)

My advice? The more expensive the equipment, (the cost of the R-1, even now, isn't exactly pocket change) ... then the worse your camera bag should look. Currently, I use a well-worn self-customized leather Healthy Back bag from Ameribags. I scuffed it up as much as possible; waterproofed it; then lined the inside with temperpedic foam to cuddle my equipment. (The foam adds a bit to the weight, but the design of the Ameribag reduces the perceived weight by 30%, so it's still very comfortable). There are plenty of compartments for filters, extra batteries, etc., and there is a special pouch on the strap for my cell so I don't have to dig for it.

The moral of this story, young grasshoppers, is this: if you can't find one you like ... make your own! Thieves won't give you a second glance; and your back, pocketbook, and camera will thank you. And it just might save your life (or at least, save you from a broken wrist!) MamaRia
Yes thanks pass on the poo bag idea, thought you ladies carried your cameras in your handbags with your other millions of bits you love to carry around, But maybethe R1 is too big and or a handbag is a red light for thieves in a lot of placeslots taken /stolen muggings there too:ak47:, Think i wont go there though , No handbag for me :?, The crumpler range is girlie too so not for realmenl like me hmmm, but does not look like a camera bag either so might look there thanks Rodo:-x
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