Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Sony

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 15, 2010, 2:02 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 11
Default My settings...

Hi all,

Ok so I have a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W230, so if I goto a fire(s) (at night) what would be best settings be?

"Program Auto" I have the following settings

Image Size: 12M (obviously)
Face Detection: Off (currently)
REC Mode: Normal (currently)
EV: +1.0 (currently)
ISO: Auto (currently)
Metering Mode: Multi (currently)
Focus: Center AF (currently)
White Balance: Auto (currently)
Flash Level: + (currently) (Shoot with higher flash intensity)
Red Eye Reduction: OFF (currently) (I don't think I need this ON at a fire)
DRO: DRO Plus (currently) (Recover shadow detail without losing highlights)
Color mode: Normal (currently) (Should this not be in "Vivid" mode?)
SteadyShot: Continuous (currently)

More settings;

AF Illuminator is set onto AUTO
Grid Line is set onto ON
AF Mode is set onto SINGLE
Digital Zoom is set onto PRECISION
Conversion Lens is OFF
Auto Orientation is ON
Auto Review is ON

As you can imagine, I don't know what 90% of the stuff means, but I'd like to learn this stuff, I could spend the time Googling, but maybe you guys can enlighten me.

If you check my Flickr address, you'll see that I've taken alot of pictures at fires, so you wonder, what do I need help with, well, I have another camera, but it's somewhat 'broken'

I'm getting it repaired, but I think it's a very good time to learn how to use my Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W230.

gdiza is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 16, 2010, 8:32 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 11
Default

No one? Nothing?
gdiza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 2010, 9:49 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

gdiza-

Welcome the Forum. We're please that you dropped by.

In reviewing your photos, it ppears that the W-230 does tend to over expose somewhat when shooting outdoors. Your first step should be to you the "P" or Programed Auto Mode on your W-230's Mode selector. It will give you better exposure control. Then check your owner's manual and look up Exposure Compensation. After reading that you can see how to easily reduce your exposure by EV-0.3 to even out the exposure in the bright sunshine oed South Africa.

A belated Happy Birthday to you on your 27th birthday. Be careful when framing your photos, please. You nearly chopped off Tracey's head in your birthday shots. The W-230 does have an optical viewfinder, so using that viewfinder, you will be able to more effectively frame your photos properly.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 2010, 9:59 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

What is your flickr address? It is not in your profile.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 2010, 4:48 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
gdiza-

Welcome the Forum. We're please that you dropped by.

In reviewing your photos, it ppears that the W-230 does tend to over expose somewhat when shooting outdoors. Your first step should be to you the "P" or Programed Auto Mode on your W-230's Mode selector. It will give you better exposure control. Then check your owner's manual and look up Exposure Compensation. After reading that you can see how to easily reduce your exposure by EV-0.3 to even out the exposure in the bright sunshine oed South Africa.

A belated Happy Birthday to you on your 27th birthday. Be careful when framing your photos, please. You nearly chopped off Tracey's head in your birthday shots. The W-230 does have an optical viewfinder, so using that viewfinder, you will be able to more effectively frame your photos properly.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Thanks for the tip, I'm trying my best to learn about all the features, all the options etc.

The reason I joined these forums was to learn from users (instead of hours of Googling).

Having said that, I do use a Kodak M1033 and in it's AUTO mode, it seems to take lovely photos.

Check my Flickr address at some of the older photos.

With that said, I'm wanting to learn how to take photos especially at fires because I'm one of the 'approved' photographers on the fire line and they use my photos for newspapers etc so I really want to continue taking lovely photos which promote the unit

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
What is your flickr address? It is not in your profile.
Check my signature... you might have turned off "seeing signatures" so I suggest you turn it on again
gdiza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 2010, 5:08 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

Actually you may want to set the white balance manually, as I have notice that auto sometimes sets up for the wrong type of lighting. You should be able to choose the different type of light you are under. sunny days, overcast day, tungsten light, florescent light, and flash. This will help your shots a bit more with getting the right exposure also.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 2:48 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
Actually you may want to set the white balance manually, as I have notice that auto sometimes sets up for the wrong type of lighting. You should be able to choose the different type of light you are under. sunny days, overcast day, tungsten light, florescent light, and flash. This will help your shots a bit more with getting the right exposure also.
Ah, and the bloody irratating part of this 'learning my camera' is that I have to goto a fire and then see how the settings work.

But I really do appreciate your comments / suggestions, because with all of them, when I get on the fire line, I sorta have an idea of WHAT settings to change instead of muddling with this and that one so it makes life a tad bit easier for me.
gdiza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 11:46 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

Your welcome
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 18, 2010, 1:06 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

gdiza-

Keep in mind your camera will produce better photos wahen it is shot in the "P" for Programed Auot mode rather than full automatic. When in the "P" mode WB is very easy to set.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 18, 2010, 1:31 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
gdiza-

Keep in mind your camera will produce better photos wahen it is shot in the "P" for Programed Auot mode rather than full automatic. When in the "P" mode WB is very easy to set.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Thanks, yes, I've decided to leave my camera on P mode and play with the settings.
gdiza is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:42 AM.