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Old Dec 2, 2003, 1:11 PM   #1
mik
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Default dsc 717

how do i prevent a shadow from appearing when i take an extreme close up.

ther is no ring flash and the lense is huge and the flash on top of it definitely throws a shadow in a clsoe up.
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Old Dec 2, 2003, 5:31 PM   #2
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Default Shadow from 717 macro shooting

I am not sure you can preclude it without using external lighting. Have you tried doing a little zoom with the macro so that you don't have to get so close or magnify post shooting with soft-ware.
You might try the ir emitters on the face of the lens as a filler light source, might work, have not tried it myself.
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Old Dec 2, 2003, 10:34 PM   #3
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With my 717, I placed a piece of white paper in front of the the flash (directly above the subject), on a 45 degree angle to bounce the flash off of.
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Old Dec 3, 2003, 2:02 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrell1
With my 717, I placed a piece of white paper in front of the the flash (directly above the subject), on a 45 degree angle to bounce the flash off of.
That sounds like a good technique. I'll have to try it.
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Old Dec 4, 2003, 10:08 PM   #5
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Default dsc 717 (closeup flash)

if you're willing to invest, say, thirty bucks, here are a couple of solutions i use.

one is a rotating-head flash on the hot shoe, with a bounce/diffuser attachment. nothing fancy here: i use a vivitar 2800 flash, which can be had for a song used since it's not smart enough to talk to cameras, and a lumiquest promax diffuser, which just velcroes onto the top of the flash in stunningly hi-tech fashion.

the flash points straight up, or cocked slightly forward; the diffuser reflects at a 45 degree angle to the flash. result: diffuse light angles downward from about 6"/15cm above the lens axis.

the other trick is to pick up a hot-shoe strobe slave, and put that on a flash unit completely off the camera (so you can aim it however you like). then all you need to do is use the on-camera flash, ensuring that its light reaches the slave unit and triggers your other flash. a bit of deftly placed aluminum foil can work wonders here.

what amazes me is that, after decades of futzing about with guide numbers and fill ratios and suchlike is that 90% of the time, the camera just does the right thing on the exposure.
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