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Old Mar 4, 2011, 9:48 AM   #1
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Default Some HX5V Advice Needed

Hi All

I have had a HX5V for about 6 months now and am still trying to get the best out of it, i have to admit that i am a novice when it comes to photography so some of these questions may sound very basic.

My first problem is Focusing, I always thought that when you took a picture the whole picture would be in focus, am i wrong? I have tried taking pictures with using the setting where its picks out loads of focus points, and the setting where it focuses just on the middle, and always the photos seem a little out of focus the further away from the centre you get, i wish i could attach some examples but not sure how to as it says the files are to big.

What is the best way to get overall good focus?

Sorry if this sounds basic, i have loads of question but dont want to get on everyones nerves so ill do them one at a time !!

Thanks

Chris
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Old Mar 4, 2011, 2:25 PM   #2
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Chris-

I use center point, spot focus with my HX5 and I am pleased with the results. Technically speaking there is no way to have everything within any photo is totally sharp focus in a point and shoot camera.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Mar 4, 2011, 4:28 PM   #3
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That picture looks great, how did you do that? did you just focus on the middle and hold your button half way down and then go all the way down??

Thanks

Chris
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Old Mar 5, 2011, 9:25 AM   #4
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That is as totally near "full" focus as I could get for you. As I mentioned in my previous post: I used center point, spot focus.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 5, 2011, 10:00 AM   #5
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its a cracking pic, what part did u focus on?
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Old Mar 5, 2011, 11:51 AM   #6
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Chris-

I focused on the Alder trees. And the shot was hand held.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 7, 2011, 11:27 AM   #7
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Chris, assuming that your shutter speed is sufficient to avoid camera shake and that your camera is in focus, the area that will appear to be sharp will depend on the Depth of Field (DOF). The DOF ("range of distance that appears acceptably sharp") varies based upon a number of factors, such as aperture, focal length and distance.

Aperture - Wider apertures = less DOF. So f/3.5 has less DOF than F/8. However, the Sony HX5, has only one aperture at any given focal length (the other is obtained with a filter rather than by changing the actual aperture). Only the amount of light is affected when you change 'aperture' with the HX5 (while keeping the same focal length), not the depth of field. So aperture can not be adjusted to increase or decrease DOF at any given focal length. However, due to the short focal lengths of the HX5 it has much more DOF than any DSLR.

Distance - Closer to the subject = less DOF. So at any given focal length the further away you are from what will be in your photo the greater the DOF and area that is sharp.

Focal Length -Longer focal length = less DOF. So at 250mm you have far less DOF than at 25mm.

A few examples:

Landscape - If you are taking a landscape at wide angle and everything in the photo is in the distance than everything in the photo should appear reasonably sharp, as everything will be within the DOF. The area you focused on will be the sharpest, but everything will be sharp (if everything is at infinity, then all will be as sharp as the lens, sensor and camera processing can manage).

Portrait - If you are taking a portait at telephoto your subject should be sharp (unless you are quite close), but the background will be blurred.

Close-up/ Macro - If you are taking a macro only a fraction of the subject will be sharp (could be less than an inch).

If you are interested in a much more complete explanation ot DOF and how it relates to sharpness here is an article.

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...h-of-field.htm

Last edited by Frank B; Mar 12, 2011 at 11:25 AM.
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Old Mar 10, 2011, 1:24 PM   #8
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wow thats a great answer thank you very much
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