Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Sony

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 5, 2011, 10:23 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11
Default DSC-T700 internal memory images corrupt, "Recovering image management file" message

Hello. This is data recovery type question. Does anyone know what's going on here?

-Many, but not all, photos in the internal storage are corrupt. There may be more but from a quick visual inspection, about half are damaged, moslty but not all after a certain date.
-Images, when viewed in a photo viewer software on a computer, appear either greyed out especially at bottom, torn and shifted like an earthquake, or it's just scrambled. Not sure what is the technical term for that. It's sort of like a messed analog TV signal. The thumbnails look fine but that's probably because the thumbnail file itself is umdamaged.
-The message "Recovering image management file..." appears. Nothing happens. I googled this message. There is almost nothing but it seems specific to the T700.

I'm guessing it's a busted FAT. Windows 7 tried to repair it without success. I read the "recovering" sticky at http://forums.steves-digicams.com/me...rd-readers-51/ but software listed there doesn't work on my Windows 7/XP computers though supposed to.

I could attach some samples if that helps diagnose.

Thanks.
Richard Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old May 5, 2011, 1:27 PM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

What do you mean by "Windows 7 tried to repair it without success"?

If you've got a damaged file system, or a failing hard drive, I'd strongly advise that you do not attempt to run any utilities on the drive before getting a full disk image backup of the drive using a specialized utility designed specifically for copying a failing drive.

Again, exactly what do you mean by "Windows 7 tried to repair it without success"?

Tried to repair what, exactly?

Did you see some kind of errors being reported? Did Windows try to repair a file system problem at bootup (or did you ask Windows to run something like chkdsk /f from a command prompt)?

You're not giving us much to go on.

Corrupted image files may be caused by a number of different things. They may have already been corrupted on your memory card at the time you copied them to your hard drive. But, you could also have a failing hard drive or a damaged file system.

You need to be very specific on any errors you saw, what you tried to fix, and how you tried to fix them. Again, what did you try to repair and how did you try to repair it?

If you do suspect a failing hard drive or corrupted file system, my advise would be to stop doing anything until you get a good disk image backup of that drive (and I can talk you through doing that using a linux utility designed for that purpose known as gnu ddrescue, provided you have another hard drive with as much or more room on it as the total size of your existing hard drive).

Give us more info on what you saw or did and we'll go from there.

Corrupted images are one thing.. but, your post makes me think you tried to repair a file system problem of some type because of the way you worded it. More info is needed.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5, 2011, 1:42 PM   #3
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

OK... I misunderstood you. Sorry about that.

Reading your post again, it sounds like you're talking about the internal storage in a camera versus on your computer's hard drive.

When you said "internal storage", I assumed you meant the hard drive in your PC. :-)

It does look like the T700 has some internal memory that can be used for storing images. See if photorec can recover the images from it when the camera is directly attached to a PC. Try Mass Storage if you see that option under any kind of USB menu options in the camera's menus. You may need to set it that way before it works properly (some cameras use PTP for connecting and that's not going to work with Photorec or similar utilities, as you'll need a USB Mass Storage Compliant Connection so that the camera's internal memory is being treated as a removable disk drive). More about photorec here:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/me...ory-cards.html

But, if the photos are already corrupted in the camera's memory and photorec can't get back good images, you'll probably need to format that space to fix any corrupted file system issues so that photos you take are stored properly going forward. There should be a format option in the camera's menus somewhere for that purpose. Then, make sure it works properly before trusting it (look at the full size images, not just the embedded thumbnails). If not, buy a memory card and try it instead.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5, 2011, 8:16 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11
Default

Okay, thanks for the advice, JimC. I will ensure the internal storage is formated before going forward.

Yes, the T700 has internal storage as well as a slot for Memory Stick. This is about the internal storage.

PhotoRec doesn't recognize the T700 although Windows (under which PhotoRec is running) does so as mass storage when connected by USB (third image, at bottom, chronologically the most recent). As soon as the camera is connected by USB, the camera display itself says "USB connected" and "mass storage". Oddly, PhotoRec does see the PMB partition (F: in this case) which is also on the camera but not the actual storage (I: in this case). PMB, Picture Motion Browser, is described as Sony's image management software and there was the odd message "Recovering image management file" as described in the original post but I think WITH SOME DOUBT these are unrelated as PMB is referring to the desktop software only.

FWIW, I've attached a few other screenshots from the PC. This forum resizes them and turns them into JPGs so they may look fuzzier than originals.
- The sequence shown in the attached file called "Connected T700 to PC" (first image, top) happened once when the USB cable was connected. I'm guessing it tried to fix the FAT32 but of course without success (which is why I am writing this) despite what it says about "Some problems were found and fixed". Having allowed Windows to try repair it may have altered the camera's internal storage.
- "Thumbnails in Win7 Explorer refreshed after import from PMB" (second image, middle) is an indication of what the full sized photos look like, corrupted or not, when seen with a photo viewer app such as the one built into Windows. There are a lot of damaged files in particular region of thumbnails which is why I selected it for the screenshot. A few photos are even merged with other photos, eg. top is the top of one undamaged photo+bottom is a corrupt random part of another photo although gray bottom is the most common. THIS PATTERN NO DOUBT PROVIDES CLUE TO THE NATURE OF THE PROBLEM. (BTW, there are a lot fewer thumbnails showing damaged pictures when they are freshly imported from the camera by PMB or when viewed directly from the camera using Windows Explorer via cable. I didn't include a screenshot of this. It's only after Windows refreshes the thumbnails they look like that mess. Windows is of course updating the thumbnail database by sampling the actual photos.)

I tried PC Inspector as well per that sticky about Reovering Images or Videos from Memory Cards. May I don't know how to use it but without going into details, it doesn't do anything apparent.
Attached Images
   

Last edited by Richard Lee; May 6, 2011 at 6:07 AM. Reason: Clarify the Thumbnails and PMB.
Richard Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6, 2011, 6:05 AM   #5
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Lee View Post
Okay, thanks for the advice, JimC. I will ensure the internal storage is formated before going forward.
That's your best bet. Personally, I always reformat media after *every* reuse using a camera's menu choice for format, no exceptions. That insures that I always start out with a fresh FAT, just the way the camera expects it (since it's performing the format)

Quote:
PhotoRec doesn't recognize the T700 although Windows (under which PhotoRec is running) does recognizes it as mass storage when connected by USB (third image, at bottom, chronologically the most recent). As soon as the camera is connected by USB, the camera display itself says "USB connected" and "mass storage". Oddly, PhotoRec does see the PMB partition (F: in this case) which is also on the camera but not the actual storage (I: in this case).
Drive letters being assigned by Windows may not have anything to do with the actual storage device being seen by applications like Photorec.

But, do make sure you check any USB related menu choices to make *sure* the camera is set to USB Mass Storage (in case that's an erroneous message and it's really using PTP instead). Also, note the section about using the whole disk options in that sticky. I suspect you may be seeing some interference from Sony's PMB software, too. In that case, using Photorec under Linux would be another way to approach it (or just making a disk image copy of your camera's internal storage and running Photorec against it).

Are the photos really important to you? If so, I could try to talk you through downloading a Live Linux distro, burning it to disk, booting into it, and running some commands to do that kind of thing. Naming conventions are very different running under Linux and it can be a bit intimidating to some users. But, that would be a better way to approach getting them back.

Mepis 11 would be a good one to use for that purpose (it's got Photorec preinstalled, as well as utilities like ddrescue that can be used to make a disk image copy of your camera's internal storage). The latest version was just released (and Mepis 11 is what I'm running right now for my desktop Operating System, as I have been since the first Release Candidates came out). See the press about it here:

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=06664

If you want to go that route, download the 32 bit .iso (for best compatibility with more software) from the link in that press release. Then burn it to DVD using something like the free isorecorder (it will give you a new choice to "Copy image to CD/DVD" if you right click on the .iso file you download from Windows Explorer).

http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm

Basically, we'd use something like the technique described in my posts on this page to make a disk image copy of your storage using ddrescue, then use photorec to recover the images from that disk image file (which would be a sector by sector copy of your camera's internal storage stored to a single file).

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/me...ialised-3.html

Quote:
..."Thumbnails in Win7 Explorer refreshed after import from PMB" (second image, middle) is what the full sized photos look like, corrupted or not, when seen with a photo viewer app such as the one built into Windows.
Embedded thumbnails in images are separate photos (and will often look just fine even when the full size image has corruption problems).

But, Windows Explorer can build it's own thumbnail cache from the full size images; and because the full size images are corrupted, the new thumbnails built by Windows will look corrupted, too. ;-)

They're probably already corrupted on your internal memory. But, in some cases, you can have photos that are continguous and show up as corrupted because of File System Problems. Realistically, they're probably already corrupted and you'd be wasting your time trying to retrieve any of them intact. The only way to know would be to try using tools that can ignore the underlying file system entirely (as photorec can do) to see if any of them may be OK.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6, 2011, 7:00 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11
Default

Thank you JimC for that wonderful explaination.
You get up very early in the morning as do I. You replied just a couple minutes before I had finished an edit on the post with the following although I suspect it doesn't anything.
-PMB, Picture Motion Browser, is described as Sony's image management software and there was the odd message "Recovering image management file" as described in the original post but I think WITH SOME DOUBT these are unrelated as PMB is referring to the desktop software only.
-although gray bottom is the most common. THIS PATTERN NO DOUBT PROVIDES CLUE TO THE NATURE OF THE PROBLEM.
-I tried PC Inspector as well per that sticky about Reovering Images or Videos from Memory Cards. May I don't know how to use it but without going into details, it doesn't do anything apparent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Drive letters being assigned by Windows may not have anything to do with the actual storage device being seen by applications like Photorec.

But, do make sure you check any USB related menu choices to make *sure* the camera is set to USB Mass Storage (in case that's an erroneous message and it's really using PTP instead). Also, note the section about using the whole disk options in that sticky. I suspect you may be seeing some interference from Sony's PMB software, too. In that case, using Photorec under Linux would be another way to approach it (or just making a disk image copy of your camera's internal storage and running Photorec against it).
Yes, I did ensure the setting on the camera for USB connection option was set to USB Mass Storage only rather than Automatic. This had no effect on Photorec. Speaking of which, if you look at that screenshot above, there is suppose to be an E drive which is on the same physical drive as D. Photorec seems to be seeing only the first partition of each physical drive. In that command line interface, I can't see the option to set Photorec to use the "whole disk" as you recommend. I also read the step by step and other pages at cgsecurity.org - nothing there about whole disk aside from recovering a hard drive using Linux.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Are the photos really important to you? If so, I could try to talk you through downloading a Live Linux distro

They're probably already corrupted on your internal memory. But, in some cases, you can have photos that are continguous and show up as corrupted because of File System Problems. Realistically, they're probably already corrupted and you'd be wasting your time trying to retrieve any of them intact. The only way to know would be to try using tools that can ignore the underlying file system entirely (as photorec can do) to see if any of them may be OK.
Not that important to set up a Linux environment from scratch although I'm technically competent to do so provided with instructions.

I'll try to make a disk image of the camera internal storage and run Photorec on it as you suggest as the last course. The closest I've done like this is using Virtual CloneDrive. Do you suggest any particular disk image making software(s)?

Last edited by Richard Lee; May 6, 2011 at 7:10 AM.
Richard Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 6, 2011, 7:12 AM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

As a general rule of thumb, I only use gnu rescue for that purpose (making a disk image backup), since it works around "hard errors" better than most. I have used dd_rescue before (similar but different utility), as well as dd (which can make a sector by sector copy, but doesn't work around hard errors) But, I only use them under LInux and I don't normally use Windows programs for that purpose (and the Windows utilities I've tried in the past "choked" on hard errors with failing media).
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:36 PM.