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Old Nov 30, 2004, 4:45 PM   #11
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I believe that john6757 is a newby like me who was not even aware of shutter speed controls. I accidentally switched my shutter speed to 30 seconds 2 weeks ago in Manual mode. I even took the camera to the store (laugh if you want :-)), but I wasn't aware of such controls in the first place.

Lates and keep posting

MECH



Check out some of my experimentation at: http://www.pbase.com/mech14



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Old Nov 30, 2004, 5:54 PM   #12
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Yes... being able to control the aperture and shutter is some conditions is desirable. Thanks for letting everyone know how to do it.

I just wanted to make sure that users understood that the settings have to be appropriate for the lighting to get properly exposed images (and the LCD has an EV indication to let you know how much your settings will underexpose or overexpose an image, so you can adjust them appropriately).

A common misconception when users are looking at cameras is that they can actually use the shutter speeds the cameras are capable of in all conditions. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. So, posts from users asking why their photos came out dark when they tried to set a faster shutter speed in lower light without a flash are common. ;-)




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Old Dec 1, 2004, 7:23 AM   #13
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there is no shutter priority / neither aperture priority in the sony w1 , so how is the user able to change between shutter speeds? :?:?
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 8:30 AM   #14
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george_ wrote:
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there is no shutter priority / neither aperture priority in the sony w1 , so how is the user able to change between shutter speeds? :? :?
did u bother to read 4 posts above urs??
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 9:33 AM   #15
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I just made my post because of reading this :blah:
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 11:27 AM   #16
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george_ wrote:
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there is no shutter priority / neither aperture priority in the sony w1 , so how is the user able to change between shutter speeds? :?:?
George, you don't need aperture or shutter priority to change shutter speeds on a DSC-W1. You go to full manual exposure. See the post that mech14 made on how to do this.

Here's the difference. With Manual Exposure, you must set both the Aperture and the Shutter Speed. But, you must use the right combination for properly exposed photos.

For example, if the EV (Exposure Value) is 6 (this is the way light is measured, and an EV of 6 is typical for a well lit interior), and you set an aperture of f/2.8 (the largest available aperture on the DSC-W1 at full wide angle), using ISO 100, then you will need a shutter speed of 1/8 second for proper exposure. But, this is really too slow to prevent motion blur, so you'd need to increase the ISO speed if you didn't want to use a flash or tripod and your subject was not stationary. Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast.

With Manual Exposure, you must use the camera's built in metering to see how your shutter speed and aperture combination impact exposure, setting both parameters for the lighting and ISO speed selected. So, it can be cumbersome to use if lighting in not consistent.

With Aperture Priority (missing on most subcompact models), you only need to set the Aperture. Then, the camera will automatically select the correct shutter speed for proper exposure of the image. This is much easier to use (since you only need to worry about one parameter, with the camera's metering changing the other, so that you have properly exposed images.

For example, if you want the camera to use the fastest shutter speeds possible for a given lighting condition, you can simply set it to the largest available aperture (represented by the smallest f/stop number) in Aperture Priority Mode. It will then automatically select the right shutter speed for proper exposure if the lighting changes (i.e., you point the camera at a subject that is not as well illuminated as another or vice-versa).

With manual exposure (where you set both shutter speed and aperture), you'd need to make changes to your settings everytime you took a photo of something with different illumination (otherwise, your subject would be either overexposed or underexposed if you left your settings alone and lighting was not consistent).

Aperture Priority solves this problem, while giving you more control over the camera's behavior (telling it to use a larger aperture for the fastest shutter speeds possible, or a smaller aperture for slower shutter speeds and greater depth of field).

Shutter Priority works in a similar manner. You set the shutter speed, and the camera automatically selects the appropriate aperture for the lighting conditions, so that you get a properly exposed image. Of course, this can backfire on you. For example, if you have a model with Shutter Priority, and try to set a shutter speed that is too fast for the largest available aperture, you'll end up with underexposed photos.

For example, with an EV of 6 (which is the typical lighting level for a well lit interior), shooting at ISO 100, if you tried to use a shutter speed of 1/100 second with a camera having a maximum available aperture of f/2.8 without a flash, then you'd end up with a very dark photo (virtually black). This is because the camera needed a much longer shutter speed to properly expose the image using the largest available aperture the camera's lens was capable of.

In most lower lighting conditions with a subcompact model, you don't really gain a thing by using Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority (for models equipped with these features), or Manual Exposure.

Why not? Because the Autoexposure Algorithms on cameras are going to select the largest available aperture in lower light anyway, automatically selecting the appropriate shutter speed for proper exposure.

If you try to setthe shutter speed to a faster value using another mode (Manual Exposure,Shutter Priority), then you'll get photos that are not properly exposed (unless you use the same settings that the camera's autoexposure was going to use anyway).

Now, there are some conditions when these modes are helpful. For example, I tend to use Manual Exposure for closeups, selecting a smaller aperture (since the camera's autoexposure would normally select a larger aperture in lower light).

Using a smaller apertureresults in slower shutter speeds. But, it also increases Depth of Field (the amount of the image that is in focus, as you get further away from you focus point). Depth of Field is more critical at closer ranges, so Manual Exposure comes in handy for macros (provided you are using a tripod, or have adequate lighting so that shutter speeds are not too slow).

Another scenario where these modes can come in handy is in better light (where the camera is selecting a smaller aperture). Perhaps it's using a shutter speed of 1/250 second, and you want a shutter speed of 1/500 second instead because you're shooting rapidly moving sports. So, you could go with manual exposure, select a larger aperture with a faster shutter speed in these conditions.

There are multiple combinations of aperture and shutter speed that would give identical results (properly exposed photos).

For example, an aperture of f/2.8 with a shutter speed of 1/500 second, would give you identically exposed images compared to using an aperture of f/4.0 with a shutter speed of 1/250 second. This is because f/2.8 is twice as bright as f/4.0, so you can use shutter speeds twice as fast for proper exposure.

The Aperture Scale in one stop increments goesf/1.0, f/1.4, f/2.0, f/2.8, f/4.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, f/11, f/16, f/22... With each one stop move to a smaller aperture (represented by larger f/stop numbers), you will need shutter speeds twice as long for proper exposure (or twice as much light for the same shutter speeds).

But, you have to use choices available for a given model. For example, the largest available aperture on the Sony DSC-W1 is f/2.8 at wide angle (typical for a subcompact model), dropping down to f/5.2 at full zoom (far less light reaches the sensor when using zoom).

The DSC-W1 also only has two aperture choices available in manual exposure (with the values of these choices changing as you use more zoom). It also has manual exposure mode only (where you must set both the aperture and the shutter speed for proper exposure), and does not offer an Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority Mode.

But, for most users, this is not a problem anyway (because the camera's autoexposure will automatically select the largest available aperture if light is lower, which is when most users will want a faster shutter speed).

So, if the shutter speed the camera selects in lower light is not adequate (and you don't want to use the flash), the easiest solution (to make sure you're still getting properly exposed photos), is to simply increase your ISO speed (since each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for any given lighting conditon and aperture setting).

So, in low light condtions, you must use the flash or a tripod (if your subjects arestationary), or a higher ISO speed.Otherwise, you'll have underexposed photos if you try to use a faster shutter speed instead in manual exposure mode, or motion blur from slower shutter speeds if you want properly exposed images).

This is because the lens is limited to a maximum available aperture. To do significantly better in low light, you need a brighter lens (capable of larger aperture settings) and/or a model capable of shooting at higher ISO speeds without objectionable noise.

Most subcompact models have lenses rated about the same.

Here is a chart that shows various aperture/shutter speed combinations for proper exposure in lower light. It's based on ISO 100. So, each time you double the ISO speed, you can use shutter speeds twice as fast. But, the lens on the camera only has a maximum aperture of f/2.8 (at it's wide angle setting), with the maximum available aperture dropping down as more zoom is used to f/5.2 at full zoom).

http://home.earthlink.net/~terryleed...tes/tables.htm


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Old Dec 1, 2004, 1:47 PM   #17
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wow! excellent article ^^
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 2:51 PM   #18
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Great tutorial JimC! I've read articles similar to your reply on other sites and slowly but surely it is all peicing together. Thanks for not giving up on us newbies...

Now all is left is for every individual to take all this info and play around w/ the camera and settings. I've been doing just that ever since I got my W1.

W1, being my 1st camera ever, is an awesome camera. I think that Im getting enough experience w/ it and education about photography that in the near future I might get an SLR!!! I had debated whether to get the Canon S500 or the Sony W1, and am glad that I decided on the W1 (even if many will disagree w/ me).

I love the manual and program modes. They are the only modes that I use since I love tinkering w/ technology and finding out how everything works (I still love using DOS, hehehe).

Anyway, I'll try to post some of my experimental pics in the next few days so that people can critique it.

Thanks everyone for these posts.

MECH out.
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 3:29 PM   #19
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Another tip (in case my numerous mentions of how using zoom impacts the largest available aperture with this modelwent unnoticed):;-)

Don't use any more zoom than you need to if you are trying to shoot in less than optimal lighting conditions (i.e., use your feet for zoom).

More than twice as much light reaches the sensor at the wide angle lens setting, so the camera's autoexposure is able to use much faster shutter speeds there. Also, motion blur from camera shake is greatly magnified as more zoom is used (another reason to stay as close as possible to wide angle in lower light).
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Old Dec 4, 2004, 10:04 AM   #20
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Well, just to close this out, thanks to nearly everybodyfor such detailed replies. I was certainly looking for more detailed answers than the one I got earlier ("change the shutter speed" with unwrittenconnotation of "you moron," which wasn't really appreciated), and you all provided that and more!



Regards
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