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Old Oct 27, 2005, 4:34 PM   #1
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Hi All,

i recently purchased a Sony DSC-P200. Well, I like the camera very much but it has a problem.

When i switch off flash and use it in dark , or when I use SL mode of flash, a HAND appears in the CCD screen indicating that it is shaking and resulting in a blurry picture. The documentation says that it is a waving hand/ handshake alert.

What ISO/EV/f settings should I use to avoid this. I called up the Sony store here in Canada, but they didn't had an answer.

My friends are teasing me saying I made a bad choice by picking up Sony. But I still love my camera ?…. Any one know how to do the settings to avoid it…

I have done a lot of searching for it, seems most of the people don't know how it can be avoided. They all say, try this n that….

Couple of people said, hold your hands steady, that sounds ridiculous, i used a Fuji and a Nikon and the same hands took beautiful pics. If that is the ONLY answer of this, does it mean Sony has a Problem ???

Please help

Thanks
Smitha

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Old Oct 27, 2005, 6:40 PM   #2
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It is just a warning to let you know you are shooting in a situation that will result in a blurry shot. You could try bumping up the ISO to 200 or 400 to allow faster shutter speeds. Or make sure you are not zoomed all the way in..your aperature is smaller at full zoom. Alot of people complain about this and I can't understand why. I also have heard alot of people complain about blurry pictures in low light because they don't want to use flash.Check any of the other forums and you will see this isone of the biggest gripes. Low light, indoor photography is a difficult situation for any consumer level digicam which is compounded by refusing to use flash. Turning the warning off will not result in better pictures. At least the warning will make you aware of the possibility of getting a blurry shot and allow you to take the steps to avoid it.
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Old Oct 27, 2005, 7:41 PM   #3
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rjseeney wrote:
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It is just a warning to let you know you are shooting in a situation that will result in a blurry shot. You could try bumping up the ISO to 200 or 400 to allow faster shutter speeds. Or make sure you are not zoomed all the way in..your aperature is smaller at full zoom. Alot of people complain about this and I can't understand why. I also have heard alot of people complain about blurry pictures in low light because they don't want to use flash.Check any of the other forums and you will see this isone of the biggest gripes. Low light, indoor photography is a difficult situation for any consumer level digicam which is compounded by refusing to use flash. Turning the warning off will not result in better pictures. At least the warning will make you aware of the possibility of getting a blurry shot and allow you to take the steps to avoid it.
THANK YOU !
I tired using ISO400(something i like about Sony, take an ISO400 image in Canon SD series, you can see a crappy and noisy image)

But some times it still gives me the waving hand...

BTW: you said this problem is present in all the consumer cams. WRONG, my bro has Canon SD400, works just fine in low lite without flash. Just FYI.

Once again I thank you for your time on this and i'm still sitting with an unanswered question.

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Old Oct 27, 2005, 7:49 PM   #4
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Once again I thank you for your time on this and i'm still sitting with an unanswered question.
What question do you need answered???
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Old Oct 27, 2005, 8:26 PM   #5
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smitha wrote:
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BTW: you said this problem is present in all the consumer cams. WRONG, my bro has Canon SD400, works just fine in low lite without flash. Just FYI.
Errr, ummm....

The shutter speeds a camera can achieve will depend on the lighting levels, the ISO speed, and the aperture setting.

The lens on the Canon SD400 has a largest aperture of f/2.8 at it's widest zoom setting, dropping off to f/4.9 at it's longest zoom setting.

The lens on the Sony DSC-P200 has a largest aperture of f/2.8 at it's widest zoom setting, dropping off to f/5.2 at it's longest zoom setting. But, the lens on the DSC-P200 also goes a bit longer compared to the SD400. So, for all practical purposes, the largest aperture on both models at any given focal length is going to be about the same.

Both models are going to use the largest aperture (represented by the smallest f/stop number) in low light indoors without a flash. Don't use any more optical zoom than you have to, since both models lose a lot of light as you set them for longer focal lengths.

So, then it comes down to things like Auto ISO (chances are, both models are going to go about the same amount here, and if not, you can set the Sony manually to a higher ISO speed), and technique. If your brother can hold a camera steadier than you can, then he may get less blurry photos. ;-)

Smaller cameras like this are not good for "existing light" photos indoors, because the largest available aperture of their lenses, coupled with ISO speed limitations, limit their usefulness. That's what the flash is for (or a tripod if shooting a non-stationary subject.

Sure, you may be able to "get away" with some higher ISO shots hand held (if lighting is pretty good indoors, and if you are very good about slowly squeezing the shutter button to try and minimize camera shake, and you don't use much optical zoom to let more light in).

But, you really need a brighter lens and/or higher ISO speeds to get photos that are not blurry more often, and these two cameras have ratings that are similar enough, that I doubt one isbetter than the other in low light (from a camera shake perspective), unless one is increasing ISO speed more (and you can do that yourself on your Sony if Auto is not going high enough) or technique is involved (holding one model steadier than another).


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Old Oct 27, 2005, 8:53 PM   #6
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A blinking hand on the LCD screen doesn't mean the picture will be bad, blurry or too dark. That only means the shutter speed is weak (less than 1/40s) and then you have to be carefull to avoid shake. In this case it is of course recommanded to use the flash, but if you dont want you can also try to avoid shake and it will be OK too !

But if the hand and the number above are both blinking, that means the picture will be too dark, and then you must use the flash or decrease the shutter speed in manual mode.

Personnaly all of my P200 pics are great. First I always use P or M mode, I try to avoid shake (just use the 2 hands!) and of course I use the flash in low light conditions !

Each model of camera needs a different use. The P200 is a great camera if you know to use it. But I don't understand, why don't you want to use the flash ??








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Old Oct 27, 2005, 8:53 PM   #7
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JimC,



Well said!!!
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Old Oct 27, 2005, 10:37 PM   #8
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Doris wrote:
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A blinking hand on the LCD screen doesn't mean the picture will be bad, blurry or too dark.

But I don't understand, why don't you want to use the flash ??
TOOOOOO many people are educating me.. and ON NOTHING.. pls pls tell me what information can one get from this post. All i understood was.

1. Always user P or M
2. U SHUD HAVE steady hands
3. WHY ARE U USING FLASH

oh god... except the first one, do you sincerely... think someone is going to be of help with your answer. I have a honest suggestion, pls do NOT post if you dont know the answer .. THANK YOU !

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
JimC,
U seem to understand the problem and i like the way u attack it.. thank you for your inputs...

Do you suggest any particular EV or f settings in P or M mode in this camera...


Once again this is the requirement…
1. The stadium(say) is dark(not really dark)

2. I can hold the camera steady(coz I took with SD400)
3. And I don't wanna use flash, coz as u know if I use flash, the guys sitting rite infront of me wud be clearer washing out the pic I'm trying to shoot.
4. Yes I'm not increasing the focus


THANKS ONCE AGAIN...
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PS: I'm not being rude here, i'm trying my best to get a good pic at the situations i mentioned. I used SD400 it gave me a good un-blurry pic, and at any cost i dont wanna replace my DSC-P200 coz i know its a good one.. but wanna educate myself on how to avoid this...
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Old Oct 27, 2005, 10:53 PM   #9
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smitha wrote:
Quote:
-----------------------------------------
JimC,
U seem to understand the problem and i like the way u attack it.. thank you for your inputs...

Do you suggest any particular EV or f settings in P or M mode in this camera...


Once again this is the requirement…
1. The stadium(say) is dark(not really dark)

2. I can hold the camera steady(coz I took with SD400)
3. And I don't wanna use flash, coz as u know if I use flash, the guys sitting rite infront of me wud be clearer washing out the pic I'm trying to shoot.
4. Yes I'm not increasing the focus


.
Unless you want to deliberately underexpose a photo (making it darker), you can't really do anything more with your camera settings to reduce blur from movement, other than increasing ISO speed. You can use a tripod for camera shake (but, that won't help with motion blur from subject movement).

Your Sony is already going to be using the largest available aperture (smallest f/stop) number in low light without you changing anything.One exception to this would be "sports mode" (with some of the Sony models it works "backwards" by selecting a smaller aperture to increase DOF, so don't use it).

Stay at your wide angle lens position as much as possible (almost 3 times as much light reaches the sensor through the lens at wide angle, compared to maximum zoom with your model).

All cameras are going to work ina similar fashion (the way light, aperture and ISO speed impact shutter speed).

Here is an online exposure calculator that may help you understand the relationship between ISO speed (shown as film speed), Lighting, Aperture and Shutter speed.

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

Select a film speed (like 400, which is your cameras maximum ISO speed), select a lighting level (you'll see a menu with choices), an aperture (your camera's largest aperture is f/2.8 at wide angle, dropping off to f/5.2 at full zoom), then let it calculate the shutter speed needed for proper exposure.

You really don't have any choices for getting shutter speeds faster (unless you want to deliberately underexpose), once you go to ISO 400 (your Sony is going to use the largest aperture anyway in low light, and set the appropriate shutter speed for the lighting).

For sports in a stadium, or indoor use without a flash, a DSLR is a better solution. You can shoot at up to ISO 1600 (or even 3200) with one, and can get a variety of different lenses. Each time you double the ISO speed, a camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for a given lighting condition and aperture.




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Old Oct 28, 2005, 8:09 AM   #10
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smitha wrote:
[quote]rjseeney wrote:
Quote:
It BTW: you said this problem is present in all the consumer cams. WRONG, my bro has Canon SD400, works just fine in low lite without flash. Just FYI.
The basic advice given by the poster is correct regardless of whether your 'bro' has this problem with his cam or not. Low light will give noisy/blurry photos regardless of camera. Some cameras do perform better than others, but the basic problems exists for ALL cameras.

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