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Old Feb 18, 2006, 2:37 AM   #1
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I'm still trying to get myself familiarized with my new H1. My first impression is not as positive as I was hoping (but not bad either). Most pictures I took were OK as far as sharpness goes (no apparent "fog effect", as the Canon S2 photos I've seen) but they seem a bit too dark. Any ideas of what settings I can change to improve exposure? I shot these pictures with the camera set to P. I'm thinking about increasing the EV by 0.3.
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 2:38 AM   #2
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 2:41 AM   #3
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 2:41 AM   #4
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Old Feb 18, 2006, 2:42 AM   #5
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Old Feb 23, 2006, 9:15 PM   #6
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i think they are very nice shots.

Umm a way to increase exposure of these images would be to change ur metering mode. I think at the mo you will have ur metering mode on average. this takes the entire image into consideration and will set exposure level accordingly. AS the shots you are taking have high contrat (Bright sky, dark ground) The cam is correctly exposing the sky explaining ur fantasitc sky detail but the ground is not considered.

I would try a centre weighted metering and as these are landscape shots focus should not be an issue as i would image it would be near or at infinity. Centre weighted means the cam focuses on correctly exposing the subjects within a white sqaure. this should be shown on ur lcd. Aim the cam to whre the image usually appears dark and half press shutter so cam can adjust exposure to correctly expose the darkened area. once the cam has adjusted keep ur finger half press and move the cam so you can compose ur shot and then click.

Orrrrrr i cant remember if the h1 has an exposure lock but if it does just press it and it will hold this value while u compose.

Moreover i dont see why by simply increasing ev wouldnt work either. The only pitfall with this is when you do have a correctly exposed situation this may blow out image and over expose it.



hope this helps
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Old Feb 23, 2006, 9:17 PM   #7
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Tullio wrote:
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just tried basic shadow enhancing.

is this whatu mean?



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Old Feb 23, 2006, 9:20 PM   #8
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this is whati mean

Set to centre weighted and aim to a darker portion of the image. This should get the cam to correctly expose the area in the centre square. Keep in mind that if the bottom is darker than the top, when the bottom is correctly exposed this may cause the brighter portion of ytour image to blow out. just try metering different portions of your landscape. Or if you dsont mind a bit of photoshop just meter some where in the middle and get photoshop to enhance shadow and highlight detail like i tried in your other pic above
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Old Feb 27, 2006, 12:12 AM   #9
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Hi Ken, unfortunately, the H1 does notoffer exposure lock. I do use center-weight most of the time but the problem is, the light metering is made based on what the center is pointing to. So, in high contrast situations, if I point the camera to the bright area, the darkturns out too dark and vice-versa. I've triedincreasing the light (as you did) but, although I can see what is in the shaded area, the whole picturebecomes very noisy. Ijust came back from the mountains and took a lot of snow pictures, which I'm about to download. I used the histogram this time to guide me so we'll see how it goes.
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Old Feb 27, 2006, 3:13 AM   #10
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yeah unfortuntly the h1 doent really have the dynamic range lie top end slrs so this sort of end product is hard to achieve.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"but yea if you are keen on post processing with photoshop you can use either noise ninja or neat image to counteract the excess noise generated.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"all the best

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"ken


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