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Old Apr 13, 2006, 2:47 PM   #1
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I'm just about ready to order an R1. But I have one question: how good is the handheld image quality at full or partial telephoto? Do you need to bump the iso up to 400 to achieve good handheld results?

Thanks in advance for your help.
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 5:00 PM   #2
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I doubt anyone can give you answer without knowing how much light you'd have. ;-)

The rule of thumb for hand held photos is that shutter speeds should be 1/focal length or faster.

In other words, if you're shooting a 50mm, you'd want shutter speeds to be 1/50 second or faster. If you're shooting at 100mm, you'd want shutter speeds to be at 1/100 second or faster, etc. Camera shake is magnified as focal lengths get longer.

The Sony DSC-R1 has a maximum focal length that has the same angle of view that a 120mm lens would on a 35mm camera. So, it's not very long (about the same on the long end as most models with 3x zoom lenses). The widest you can open the aperture up on it's long end is f/4.8


Indoors or Outdoors?

For outdoor use in good light, you could probably leave it set to ISO 160 and have shutter speeds fast enough to prevent blur from camera shake.

But, in typical indoor lighting, if you're at the long end of it's lens, you may need to use ISO 1600 and be careful about squeezing the shutter smoothly for maximum sharpness without a flash or tripod.

A typical "well lit" household at night has an EV (Exposure Value) of about 6.

At f/4.8 (widest aperture available on the long end) and ISO 1600, that would put your shutter speeds at 1/45 second. That's below the "rule of thumb" for hand holding a camera (you'd want to have shutter speeds of 1/120 second or faster and the lens isn't bright enough on the long end to give you that in typical indoor lighting). You could use ISO 3200 in a pinch (but, I'd suggest avoiding it).

Keep in mind that the 1/focal length rule of thumb is only a"rule of thumb. Some people can hold a camera much steadier compared to others. If your subjects are moving much, you could get some motion blur from subject movement at shutter speeds that slow. But, you might be surprised at the number of keepers at shutter speeds even slower than that.

If you can't use a flash or tripod in most indoor conditions, you're probably better off staying closer to the wide end of the lens (where it will be much brighter compared to the long end).

If you can use a flash and stay within the rated flash range, you won't need to worry about it, though (keep ISO speeds set lower and let the flash get rid of blur from camera shake or subject movement).

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Old Apr 13, 2006, 5:37 PM   #3
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someone once told me that for handheld shots yours shutter speed should e 1/35mm zoom equiv. So with your zoom set to 100mm, then as long as ur shooting conditions suits a 1/100 shutter speed at iso100 thn iso100 it is. Only need to bump up iso if the lighting conditions are getting darker.

So short ans. making tons of assumptions
On a decent lit day, NO
On Cloudy Day, probly stil NO
Indoor, More likely yes
Evening, YES
Night, Definatly

ken
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 5:42 PM   #4
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Thanks for your reply. It sounds like the r1 will be great for what I mostly do: outdoor travel and nature shots. Indoors, say a cathedral, I would use those pillars that the builders so conveniently placed every forty feet or so!

I used to shoot a lot with my Canon F-1 with telephoto. But I mainly used iso 400 film and never shot below 1/125 th of a second without support.

Thanks again.
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 6:20 PM   #5
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Wolf
It is really difficult to answer to you. Nevertheless as owner of R1 I can tell that 400 ISO is exactly what R1 is for.
low or let's say NO noise at 400 ISO.
It depends also on your hands that is very personal matter.
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 6:30 PM   #6
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yes definately depends on the persons hands too

i can shoot at 420mm with a shutter around 1/200 without too many issues. With my image stabiliser on prob a tad under 1/100

But i seem to have very steady hands. I did a shot at 1/6 but at ful wide though and tht was handheld and very sharp.

The r1 is a flagship camera and endorces the latest and greatest technology im sure it will blow u away with its stagering results and versatility and like mentioned easlier the new cmos and raw primary clr noise reduction produces very clean and crisp results at higher iso levels.

ken
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