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Old Dec 16, 2006, 9:28 AM   #41
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I think the amount of light helps diminish or accentuate the effects of vignetting (less light, more vignetting and vice-versa). The focal length also plays its role as vignetting tends to become more noticeable at 35mm rather than 72mm, Before you consider buying a new adapter, I'd try to shoot w/o and see what the results are. You can always crop the image a bit to remove or minimize the amount of vignetting.

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Old Dec 16, 2006, 4:28 PM   #42
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Tullio wrote:
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I think the amount of light helps diminish or accentuate the effects of vignetting (less light, more vignetting and vice-versa). The focal length also plays its role as vignetting tends to become more noticeable at 35mm rather than 72mm, Before you consider buying a new adapter, I'd try to shoot w/o and see what the results are. You can always crop the image a bit to remove or minimize the amount of vignetting.

Tullio.
Hey Tullio,

Yes, that's what I've noticed so far. Low light...vignette occurs...even if rare. Majority of my low light shots were good. Lots of sunshine...haven't seen it at all so far.

Will definitely try shooting in low light without the adapater/filter to test when I find the time.

Cropping pictures where vignetting is obvious? Sure. Could definitely do that too.

Will I still buy the Raynox kit? Shrugs. I did find a few shops in Toronto selling Raynox gear. But didn't see either of the 2 kits litsted. Did e-mail them. Should hear from them sometime next week.

And about focal lengths...vignetting was noticable for me n pics at higher forcal lengths. Under low light conditions. As evident in the two pics I posted.

Any how, this isn't important for me at the moment. Probably won't doing any shooting till next year. If I do shoot some pics this month I can try without the adpater/filter. If I see vignetting again. I can just use the H1 without the adapter/filter. As I'm guessing I won't see vignetting w/o them. Or, I might just go ahead and pick up the Raynox kit. Who knows? :lol:

And one more thing...can you do me a favor? Can you tell me what is the length of the Raynox adapter? How much shorter is it than the Sony? Curious...Thanks.

Take care.

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Old Dec 17, 2006, 8:55 AM   #43
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Vignetting. I just took a look at my H1. Extended the lens to the 12x optical zoom mark. Looks like the lens extends to the front of the adapter. Just like the way it looks on the Raynox website using their Raynox adapter. And the Raynox is "shorter"? By how much? And would it actually make a difference? Because, obviously the adpater has to be long enough for the lens to fully extend without bumping into the filter.

And at focal lengths between 17-40mm (where I noticed vignetting on roughly 5 out of 300 plus pics) the lens should be extended the same amount. Why would I see vignetting on my pics shot at those lengths using the Sony adpater and nota userusing a Raynox?

Tullio, are you saying that you've never ever gotten vignetting using your Raynox adpater. Especially if you shot also under similar conditions? Dark dky? Raining? At the same focal lengths?


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Old Dec 17, 2006, 6:01 PM   #44
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Dark,

The difference in size between the Sony and the Raynox adapters is almost unmeasurable but enough to make a difference. If I use the Raynos WA converter with the Sony adapter, vignetting will occur for sure. In this case the reason is because the WA converter has a 52mm mount while the Sony adapter has a 58mm mount. Therefore a step down ring 58-52mm is also needed thus placing the converter too far from the lens. But before buying the Raynox adapter, I bought one of those non-brand 52mm adapter and vignetting occurred when using either filters or the Raynox WA converter. So, my conclusion is that the Raynox folks designed an adapter that is as short as it can possibly be w/o interfering with the lens extension and those couple of millimiters really make a difference. If you only see vignetting in 4-5 pictures out of 300, you are in good shape and I would certainly not bother getting another adapter unless you decide to buy the Raynox WA converter. Now as far as my experience goes, for the most part I see no vignetting on my pictures but every now and then, I notice very mild vignetting when photographing bright blue sky and I know it's the filter because when I first bought the H1, I took about 500 pictures w/o using any adapter or filters in front of the lens and going back to those pictures, I see absolutely no vignetting what-so-ever.

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Old Dec 17, 2006, 8:20 PM   #45
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Tullio wrote:
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Dark,

The difference in size between the Sony and the Raynox adapters is almost unmeasurable but enough to make a difference. If I use the Raynos WA converter with the Sony adapter, vignetting will occur for sure. In this case the reason is because the WA converter has a 52mm mount while the Sony adapter has a 58mm mount. Therefore a step down ring 58-52mm is also needed thus placing the converter too far from the lens. But before buying the Raynox adapter, I bought one of those non-brand 52mm adapter and vignetting occurred when using either filters or the Raynox WA converter. So, my conclusion is that the Raynox folks designed an adapter that is as short as it can possibly be w/o interfering with the lens extension and those couple of millimiters really make a difference. If you only see vignetting in 4-5 pictures out of 300, you are in good shape and I would certainly not bother getting another adapter unless you decide to buy the Raynox WA converter. Now as far as my experience goes, for the most part I see no vignetting on my pictures but every now and then, I notice very mild vignetting when photographing bright blue sky and I know it's the filter because when I first bought the H1, I took about 500 pictures w/o using any adapter or filters in front of the lens and going back to those pictures, I see absolutely no vignetting what-so-ever.

Tullio.
Ok dude,

Thanks for your post. So in the end if I totally want to avoid vignetting then I'll just remove the adapter/filter. Which I did earlier today incidentally.

In my experience, with my setup, I've yet to get vignetting in any of my daylight scenes. With lots of sunshine. Or when it's bright outside and shooting people on a stange who are covered by a roof. Using dim stage lights. Well dim in comparison to areas directly under the sun. It's only been the odd scene in dark scenes when raining. Shrug.

Will read that article again later.

Have a good week!
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 5:14 PM   #46
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Tullio,

You mentioned you tend to shoot in Av mode a lot. When you do thatdoes it automatically assume you want all action frozen? And opt for a shutter speed fast enough? Assume you've set the camera to f/5.6...

Thanks.

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Old Dec 23, 2006, 12:11 AM   #47
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Hi Dark,

Av mode is good to shoot still objects. Theoretically, Av mode lets you control DoF however, with PaS cameras this concept does not work too well since a f2.8 is in reality equivalent to f11 on a dSLR and that's not going to produce a shallow DoF. I shoot in Av mode because I find f4.0-f5.6 the best aperture for the H1. Therefore, I prefer to choose the aperturemyself rather than let the camera do it. In your case, you should use Tv (S mode) so that you can freeze people's movements. I suggest a shutter speed of 1/250 or higher to avoid blur.
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Old Dec 23, 2006, 8:02 AM   #48
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Tullio wrote:
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Hi Dark,

Av mode is good to shoot still objects. Theoretically, Av mode lets you control DoF however, with PaS cameras this concept does not work too well since a f2.8 is in reality equivalent to f11 on a dSLR and that's not going to produce a shallow DoF. I shoot in Av mode because I find f4.0-f5.6 the best aperture for the H1. Therefore, I prefer to choose the aperturemyself rather than let the camera do it. In your case, you should use Tv (S mode) so that you can freeze people's movements. I suggest a shutter speed of 1/250 or higher to avoid blur.
Hello Tullio,

Thanks for the advice! I'll probably end up sticking with Program AE, Tv part of the time and manual mode later when I really want to have complete control creatively. But I think I'll most likely be shooting in P mode most of the time.

Have a good Xmas and a Happy New Year!!

Dark.
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Old Dec 23, 2006, 12:14 PM   #49
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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all!
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Old Dec 26, 2006, 9:19 PM   #50
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I posted over here before I saw this post dedicated to the H1 users:

Flash problems... too slow!

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=28
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