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Old Jul 14, 2006, 11:59 AM   #1
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Hello guys,

I thought it would be a great idea if there was one main thread for anything to do with our experienceswith ourH1cameras. A place whereexperiencedand new users of the H1 can ask questions and have them answered. Make comments. And offer tips for better results.




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Old Jul 18, 2006, 2:45 PM   #2
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How's the H1 working for you. Dark? Posted any photos yet???
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Old Jul 19, 2006, 12:40 AM   #3
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Tullio wrote:
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How's the H1 working for you. Dark? Posted any photos yet???
It's working out great. Walked around my neighborhood. Shot some pics. Just came from a Afro-Brazilian Festival this past weekend downtown by the lakeshore. Shot even more pics. I think roughly 30. Will be attending another festival this coming weekend. This time a Latin themed one. More opportunities.

Oh and remember I mentioned something about how after I deleted/copied the 22 files from the internal memory to the memory card the battery level readout read "half-full". That an hour later it read "full" again. You told me my H1 was near "half-full" and that after a few shots it would read "half-full" again? Well, it's still reading "full". Some 40 odd shots later. So, it looks like this is just a part of using NiMH cells.

Something similar happened recently. I was checking some settings. Battery life meter read "half-full". Turned off the camera for a few minutes. Decided to check something else. And it read "full" again. Heh!

I wonder how many pics I'll get before this first charge dies out. Keeping in mind that I'm just using the supplied Sony 2100 mAh cells. Guess I'll find out soon enough. After attending a few more festivals.

Post any pics? No not yet. But will in time.

And just found out that the Costco in Ottawa (near Montreal and several hours drive outside Toronto) is selling the 2500 mAh verisons of Sanyo cells. The guy that posted this information didn't say whether there were also the 2700 mAh variety. Looks like I'll be making a trip to my neighborhood Costco to take a look.

He said a 4-pack/charger ran $24.95 CAD. Not too bad a deal. Though, I hope they sell the Sanyo cells sans charger, as I'm planning to order a Powerex 2700 mAh package deal which includes the 401 charger.

Any how, I've babbled on long enough. Take care dood!


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Old Sep 21, 2006, 1:49 AM   #4
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Another question for H1 owners.

With interchangeable lenses there is always a "sweet spot" in terms of aperture settings. Where images are particularly sharp. What is the "sweet spot" for the fixed lens on the H1? Any one?

Thanks in advance!
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 12:08 PM   #5
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F4.0 to f5.6. The H1 is calibrated toset the aperture tof4.0 whenever it can when in P mode. Anything beyond f6.3 should cause diffraction (softness around the edges). So, try to avoid very small apertures. With DSLRs, you needvery smallapertures toobtain the greatest DoF (f16 or f22). However, an f2.8 on PaS (fixed lens) cameras is equivalent to f11 DSLR, so f4.0 will give you the same results as f22. No need to go much beyond f5.6, really. Unless, of course, you are photographing a very bright objectand you want to usea slow shutter speed for special effects.Then you have no choice but to reduce the aperture as much as possible (f8.0) or use a ND filter to cut down light.
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 2:59 PM   #6
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Tullio wrote:
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F4.0 to f5.6. The H1 is calibrated toset the aperture tof4.0 whenever it can when in P
mode. Anything beyond f6.3 should cause diffraction (softness around the edges). So, try to avoid very small apertures. With DSLRs, you needvery smallapertures toobtain the greatest DoF (f16 or f22). However, an f2.8 on PaS (fixed lens) cameras is equivalent to f11 DSLR, so f4.0 will give you the same results as f22. No need to go much beyond f5.6, really. Unless, of course, you are photographing a very bright objectand you want to usea slow shutter speed for special effects.Then you have no choice but to reduce the aperture as much as possible (f8.0) or use a ND filter to cut down light.
Ok thanks dood. Noted.

Regarding filters...I am planning to pickup a ND filter. Maybe one from Sigma or Cokin. Which one do you use? Or are you using one?

I'm also considering a CPL filter later. Maybe one from Nikon as they are said to be the most neutral. Compared to those from Hoya, B&W, Tiffen...etc.

And possibly a UV from Cokin. Again later. Or "....when I get around to it".

Cya.


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Old Sep 21, 2006, 6:04 PM   #7
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I'd start on a reverse order. The UV should be the first filter to buyif you want to keep the adapter on the camera at all times (which I recommend to keep the lens extention free and protected). It will protect the lens and some will help reduce haze. I have bought many UV filters to see if there was a significant difference between them: Hoya, B&W, Bower, Promaster, Tiffen (I returned itbecause it is cheaply made)and Sigma. The bestIMO is theSigma EX multi-coated, which actually reduced haze significantly. The Hoya, Bowerand B&W are also good but they did not affect haze in any way. The Promaster affected saturation slightly.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Next comes the polarizer. You can save a lot of money by buying a linear pol instead of circular. Despite what you read, the linear pol will work just as well (trust me on this one). This issue regarding the behavior oflinear pol filterswith AFdoes not apply to current AF cameras. I've tested many different brands ofcir/linear pol in different camerasand noticed no difference in behavior between the two types. There are differences in terms of saturation between brands with theHoya cir polproducing the most saturated images of all brands(too much for my taste but if you really want deep blue skies, that's the filter to get). I prefer theTamron linear pol. It's very efficient and produces more natural images.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Then the ND filter. I onlyhave the Sony so I don't know how it compares with other brands. It's a -3 filter and its use is very limited. I use it primarily forshooting water fountains/falls in brightdaylight when I want to create a cottony effect (slow shutter speed). You can't obtain this effectw/o the ND filterbecause f8.0 is not small enough of an apertureso as you slow down the shutter speed, the image becomes totally over exposed (unless you have an ND filter).
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 7:42 PM   #8
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Tullio wrote:
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I'd start on a reverse order. The UV should be the first filter to buyif you want to keep the adapter on the camera at all times (which I recommend to keep the lens extention free and protected). It will protect the lens and some will help reduce haze. I have bought many UV filters to see if there was a significant difference between them: Hoya, B&W, Bower, Promaster, Tiffen (I returned itbecause it is cheaply made)and Sigma. The bestIMO is theSigma EX multi-coated, which actually reduced haze significantly. The Hoya, Bowerand B&W are also good but they did not affect haze in any way. The Promaster affected saturation slightly.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Next comes the polarizer. You can save a lot of money by buying a linear pol instead of circular. Despite what you read, the linear pol will work just as well (trust me on this one). This issue regarding the behavior oflinear pol filterswith AFdoes not apply to current AF cameras. I've tested many different brands ofcir/linear pol in different camerasand noticed no difference in behavior between the two types. There are differences in terms of saturation between brands with theHoya cir polproducing the most saturated images of all brands (too much for my taste but if you really want deep blue skies, that's the filter to get). I prefer theTamron linear pol. It's very efficient and produces more natural images.
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Then the ND filter. I onlyhave the Sony so I don't know how it compares with other brands. It's a -3 filter and its use is very limited. I use it primarily forshooting water fountains/falls in brightdaylight when I want to create a cottony effect (slow shutter speed). You can't obtain this effectw/o the ND filterbecause f8.0 is not small enough of an apertureso as you slow down the shutter speed, the image becomes totally over exposed (unless you have an ND filter).
Hey Tullio,

So you'd recommend a UV before a ND as the filter to keep on our H1's 90% of the time? I assumed a UV would only be good on days when it's a bit hazy. Which isn't often up here in Toronto. On good days it's just bright. So I assumed a ND would have been the way to go.

And as I said I was thinking of getting a Sigma ND filter. Possibly also a SIgma CPL. Linear? hmmmm...

And about the Hoya PL and CPL filters lots of people complain about how they put a green tint on the image. So I think I'll stay away from Hoya. Even though I would like to get the deep blue skies, water.... And probably go with either a Sigma or Nikon. More Nikon as I've heard that they are the most neutral on the forums. Not sure how Sigma's are. Or Cokin's "digital" line of screw-in filters.


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Old Sep 21, 2006, 9:50 PM   #9
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The UV is the only filter you can actually keep on the lens at all times because it does not affect exposure in any way. Polarizers will cut 1-1 1/2 fstops so it's good in bright daylight only. Besides, polarizers' primary objective is toreduce glare and reflection, not to protect the lens. It also increases color saturation but you must have side lighting for the effect to be significant. The ND filter cuts the amount of light reaching the camera's sensor. Again, only good in bright daylight (even more so than the pol.). As I mentioned, I really like the Sigma UV EX MC filter. I have a Hoya Moose Warm Polarizer which is also decent and works well on land and seascape photography but makes earth tones over saturated. I'm not familiar with the Nikon filters but I think they cost too much and the cheap ones are not MC. I'd stick with the Sigma if I were you. And yes, you can save some money by buying a linear polarizer. They will work just the same, trust me.
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Old Sep 22, 2006, 12:24 AM   #10
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Tullio wrote:
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The UV is the only filter you can actually keep on the lens at all times because it does not affect exposure in any way. Polarizers will cut 1-1 1/2 fstops so it's good in bright daylight only. Besides, polarizers' primary objective is toreduce glare and reflection, not to protect the lens. It also increases color saturation but you must have side lighting for the effect to be significant. The ND filter cuts the amount of light reaching the camera's sensor. Again, only good in bright daylight (even more so than the pol.). As I mentioned, I really like the Sigma UV EX MC filter. I have a Hoya Moose Warm Polarizer which is also decent and works well on land and seascape photography but makes earth tones over saturated. I'm not familiar with the Nikon filters but I think they cost too much and the cheap ones are not MC. I'd stick with the Sigma if I were you. And yes, you can save some money by buying a linear polarizer. They will work just the same, trust me.
Ok I see what you're saying now about the filters. Thanks!

When I get the chance I'll go look into getting either a Sigma UV or a Nikon. I could have sworn the Nikons are MC. Will have to double check. Then again I don't want to spend too much as it's just for my H1 (and not a DSLR).

About linear PL filters. I'll look into that too when I'm getting my UV.

Have a good weekend Tullio!

Btw...do you shoot solely with the H1? Or do you also shot with a DSLR? And you wouldn't happen to have a pic showing the over saturated earth tones would you?
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