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-   -   [Recovered Thread: 35449] (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/studio-lighting-flash-other-53/%5Brecovered-thread-35449%5D-34321/)

Sep 24, 2004 11:33 PM

I'm thinking of starting a thread on portrait lighting that didn't cost the price of a Studio. (I don't have one & couldn't afford one either). Anybody interested? Here's an example of what I mean:

http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...%3B54%3Bot1lsi

Lighting was a Vivitar 285HV at 1/2 power reflected into a 42" silver umbrella 45% to her left front & a 60" white umbrella directly in front reflecting a 100W Norman strobe (I bought on Ebay for less than 1/3 of it's original cost).

picnet Sep 25, 2004 12:40 AM

yup me for one as i am very interested :), but you probably already knew that..lol

Frank Doorhof Sep 25, 2004 1:55 AM

Very nice, let's share some secret's :D.

1.
Instead of a reflector I most of the time use a 250w flash which I bounce of a darkgrey wall or curtain, the reason is simple I can really adjust the ammount of bounce from almost nothing to 1/5th of a flash on it's lowest setting.

2.
Instead of a reflector I sometimes use a rescue blanket (almost free) on which I bounce, one side is silver one side is gold, no examples yet sorry.

3.
When working with blackbackdrops and softboxes and I can't move far enough from the backdrop to get no lightspill I use a large carton to blank the softbox on one side and move it to the side of the model and place another one on the other side, I use the bounced flash from 1 for the fillin on the top.

Greetings,
Frank

zstojkovic Sep 25, 2004 10:09 AM

as most people herei like the idea.exchange of knowleadge and ideas canhelp us to atcheive better results.

thanks,

zoran

Barry Sep 25, 2004 11:51 AM

Does this beautiful gal remind anyone of Ann-Margret besides me? :cool:

Sep 25, 2004 8:18 PM

Frank Doorhof wrote:
Quote:

Very nice, let's share some secret's :D.

1. Instead of a reflector I most of the time use a 250w flash which I bounce of a darkgrey wall or curtain, the reason is simple I can really adjust the ammount of bounce from almost nothing to 1/5th of a flash on it's lowest setting.

2. Instead of a reflector I sometimes use a rescue blanket (almost free) on which I bounce, one side is silver one side is gold, no examples yet sorry.

3. When working with blackbackdrops and softboxes and I can't move far enough from the backdrop to get no lightspill I use a large carton to blank the softbox on one side and move it to the side of the model and place another one on the other side, I use the bounced flash from 1 for the fillin on the top.

Greetings,
Frank
Sounds good Frank, but I was thinking more about folks posting an image & providing the lighting info with it (so people can get an idea of how it was made). Like:

http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...B88%3B37ot1lsi
Clamp reflector with a 150W halogen hot light to my immediate upper right & about 25 degrees to her left...reflected off of a ceiling/wall corner. Another 150W halogen clamp light mounted on a stand & shooting through a 42" white translucent umbrella.

BTW, good idea on using the rescue blanket...I can see that being a huge plus in outdoors shade if it's placed under the front of your subject!! When I was getting my feet wet, I found some car windshield reflectors work pretty well to! Since then, I've bought & used a 42" 5-in-1 reflector disc that provides a LOT more reflection (plus it's silver/gold/white/translucent or black in one 12 inch disc when folded down.

Tom Overton Sep 25, 2004 10:46 PM

Greetings;

Ok, I'm just trying to wrap my head around that picture. While I have known people with eyes that are two different colours, I've never seen it that dramatic before. I know that it is easily done with photoshop, so I guess it's really no big deal. It seems a little dramatic to me, but if that is what you were trying to accomplish, the comment shold be "well done". It did make me think.

Very nice composition and lighting, by the way.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

Frank Doorhof Sep 26, 2004 3:50 AM

http://www.doorhof.nl/models/albums/...2004%20100.jpg

On the right side a 400W flash with barndoors and grid slightly behind the model and slight above (arround 1/5th output).
On the left side a 250W flash with snoot and grid pointed from middle position towards the back of the model (very low on output)

And one flash 250W with standard reflector pointed at a dark grey wall bouncing some fill in light on the model.

The shot was arranged very carefully so that there would be some lens flare from the right flash making it like there is a beam of light coming to the model.

Greetings,
Frank

RyanH Sep 26, 2004 1:10 PM

Kalypso, I was going to PM you about setting up a thread or section in regards to this very subject.

In my opinion, I would like to see the photo, with a description of the lighting and maybe even a photo of the lighting setup if people have it or wish to share it. I think this would be a big asset to a lot of aspiring portrait photographers.

Tom - That model of Kalypso's is Jess. Hedoes a great job a photographing her. And if memory serves me right, her eyes are actually two different colors.

One last thing, when you guys are taking these photos, say the one posted with Jess. Are there no other light sorces in the room? Meaning, the room is completely dark except for the"studio" lights?

Sep 26, 2004 2:54 PM

RyanH wrote:
Quote:

(snip)
Tom - That model of Kalypso's is Jess. He does a great job a photographing her. And if memory serves me right, her eyes are actually two different colors.

One last thing, when you guys are taking these photos, say the one posted with Jess. Are there no other light sorces in the room? Meaning, the room is completely dark except for the "studio" lights?
My studio is ususally just a wall in a bedroom that I hang backdrops from. There is some light coming in from some closed blinds, but it really doesn't effect the images. If I'm shooting fine art or figure work, I would choose a location that had zero light other than the those I chose (like Franks lighting in his image above).

Yes, Jess has one green & one brown eye...very cool too! Color depth & saturation depends on the light & angle to it.

http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...43%3B553ot1lsi
Lighting was one 150W halogen clamp light reflecting off of a 42" silver umbrella, above & to her left at about 45 degrees to her front. Front light was a 100W halogen clamp light reflecting off of a 42" umbrella, slightly above eye level & about 3ft away.

Sep 27, 2004 7:13 PM

Well, as long as I'm showing cheap lighting alternatives...this was shot in her home while I was on the road.

http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...52439932ot1lsi

4ft directly in front of model, a Vivitar 285HV, set at 3/4 power & bounced off of a Photogenic 60" Eclipse white convertable umbrella. Above the rear of her head at about 50 degrees, a 100W halogen hot lamp reflected off of a silver umbrella with a 12" gold disc inserted between the upper ribs (the gold gives blondes & redheads brighter highlights). Shot with a Canon D30 on a tripod directly under the 60" umbrella.

RyanH Sep 27, 2004 11:10 PM

Quick question for you guys. How do you get your models so natural looking? I am tinkering around with some lighting and the subjects come out kinda yellow. Any tips?

I am using a halogen work light shining through a white sheet (sort of a soft box :lol:) and a desk lamp with no reflector.

Frank Doorhof Sep 28, 2004 1:33 AM

Hi,
Colorbalance.

I shoot RAW and afterwards I will collorcorrect the RAW's with or PS or C1 (for archiving JPG's, I archive both Raw's and a JPEG version).

When using tungsten light you will get a yellow cast, set your camera on tungsten and it should be better.

Greetings,
Frank

RyanH Sep 28, 2004 8:08 PM

I am talking about color. My people pics in front of lighting come out a bit yellow.

Now the newbie question. I know how to set the white balance on my camera. What I don't know is what to set it to. I have a auto settings I can try, but if I wanted to manually set the white balance, what do you suggest I point the camera at to set it? And I am assuming whatever I point the camera at should be lit under the lighting I am using, correct?

Sep 28, 2004 8:51 PM

You should set your white balance using something that's a solid white in the light you are going to be shooting in. However, as Frank said, halogen lamps are tungsten & setting your camera to the tungsten white balance should fix the yellow cast.

If I remember correctly, you are using a Canon G3 & will have the option of shooting in RAW. Doing so eliminates any white balance corrections your camera would try to make anyway. You then set the white balance in your computer software in post processing (what I would recommend anyway). As long as I'm posting...
http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...5364%3B3ot1lsi
Two halogen hot lights, one reflecting directly off the background to her rear right. The other reflecting off of a 42" silver umbrella in front. Shot RAW with a Dimage 7i, with a white diffuse glow added in Photoshop later.

RyanH Sep 28, 2004 10:56 PM

Thanks Kalypso & Frank.

I will try shooting some images in RAW. I am not farmiliar with changing white balance in editing. Any pointers? I am using PhotoShop Elements 2.0.

Frank Doorhof Sep 29, 2004 12:43 AM

Hi,
In PS you will find an autocolor sometimes that works.
Otherwise go to levels and get the white dropper and click on something solid white, try this on a few locations untill you like the effect.

Otherwise use colorbalance under adjustments.

If you shoot RAW the RAW convertor should take care of it when using tungsten.

Greetings,
Frank

flint350 Sep 29, 2004 9:09 AM

These 3 were pretty much straighforward studio lighting with 3 strobes.

First was Main thru ripstop nylon panel at 45degrees camera left and slightly above model, light fill directly above camera center thru small brolly and a subtle hair light about 30 degree behind model camera right using a honeycomb grid to control spill into face shadow area. Model was about 6ft in front of mottled gray muslin.

http://home.comcast.net/~flint350/FacingLeftSteve.jpg

This one had Main in same position but lower, somewhat higher power fill bounced off white umbrella slightly above camera andlowpower hair light aboveto catch the blowing hair tips from a simple fan placed camera front left and low at about 75 degrees.

http://home.comcast.net/~flint350/WindsweptSteve.jpg

This last one was a direct steal from one of Frank's setups (sorry Frank, but I only steal from the best). Lighting almost equivalent angles to camera (almost glamour style) with low camera angle and subtle hair light camer left and high, again with honeycomb to avoid spill and reflections. (There are catchlights in her eyes, but hard to see at this size).

http://home.comcast.net/~flint350/BlackReflectSteve.jpg



choeschen Sep 29, 2004 12:42 PM

Kalypso wrote:
Quote:

You should set your white balance using something that's a solid white in the light you are going to be shooting in. However, as Frank said, halogen lamps are tungsten & setting your camera to the tungsten white balance should fix the yellow cast.



I perfer to shoot RAW and white balance post production, however if you do want to have the camera white balance or if you are shooting film you don't have to white balance with white. You can use a gray card or even a warm card. A gray card is just as it sounds, a 50% gray card. Warm cards produce better skin tones than using just plain white. Check out this site for more information.

http://www.studio1productions.com/warm_cards.htm




I would like to setup a studio but have no idea what to get. Currently I don't have any studio equipment except for a camera. If you had a limited budget what would be the first thing you would purchase?

gibsonpd3620 Sep 30, 2004 4:55 PM

All the photos were super but I love that last one with reflection off the glass. Great imagination.

Phil

randy o Oct 1, 2004 9:48 AM

What is the model laying on, I really like the reflection it gives.



Randy O

flint350 Oct 1, 2004 2:52 PM

As I indicated in the post - I stole that idea from Frank! (credit where credit is due). It's Lexan clear plexiglass over black seamless. I could only find sheets locally in 3 X 6 (wanted 4X8 - so I went with two and merely PS'd the seam out (she's lying over it for the most part to cover it up). Glad you like it (thx. Frank).

Frank Doorhof Oct 2, 2004 1:58 AM

Hi,
I also have to take the seam out :D.

Oct 2, 2004 12:35 PM

In the interest of simplicity:
http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...43685%3Bot1lsi
One halogen lamp bounced off a white wall to her immediate right. Another halogen lamp 8ft directly in front aimed slightly toward the ceiling (so aprox. 25% of the direct light was hitting her face).

Bache Oct 2, 2004 1:37 PM

Amazing photos Kalypso! RESPECT!

RyanH Oct 2, 2004 1:43 PM

I think this thread is very helpful. We should talk to Steve about setting up a section for model photography & lighting examples.

flint350 Oct 2, 2004 3:06 PM

While not a bad idea in my mind, there is already a good deal of this info here, if more spread out. In the "Flash-Studio" forum, there is much about the lighting aspect. In the "People Forum" there is much about both. Also, Kalypso has a sticky post indicating an upcoming 'tutorial' section on lighting. Possibly the subject is being covered in too many diverse areas for now, but a lot of info is already here. What you seek could probably be incorporated into the existing "Flash Studio" forum, possibly with a slightly edited name. This would prevent missing info already posted and too much hunting around the various forums to find it.

Oct 2, 2004 5:37 PM

flint350 wrote:
Quote:

While not a bad idea in my mind, there is already a good deal of this info here, if more spread out. In the "Flash-Studio" forum, there is much about the lighting aspect. In the "People Forum" there is much about both. Also, Kalypso has a sticky post indicating an upcoming 'tutorial' section on lighting. Possibly the subject is being covered in too many diverse areas for now, but a lot of info is already here. What you seek could probably be incorporated into the existing "Flash Studio" forum, possibly with a slightly edited name. This would prevent missing info already posted and too much hunting around the various forums to find it.
Good idea...I'll move this & some of the other studio lighting threads up into the Flash (Studio) section. BTW, my 'tutorial' is actually going to be a FAQ (but maybe a sticky for people to post their lighting setups might be helpful).

Oct 4, 2004 12:34 AM

Even more simple...
http://images.snapfish.com/343725952...52436865ot1lsi
Dimage 7i, 4 second exposure in a totally dark room using a small 2-AAA penlight to "paint" the light on her...

planters49 Oct 4, 2004 10:08 AM

What do you mean by "paint" the light on her?

Oct 4, 2004 11:27 AM

planters49 wrote:
Quote:

What do you mean by "paint" the light on her?
Focus camera & trip the shutter, turn on the flashlight & use it to cover your subject with light using a back & forth waving motion. The subject has to remain totally still & not look like a deer caught in the headlights!

choeschen Oct 4, 2004 11:31 AM

Very interesting technique, did it take you long to learn this to not make them too bright or dark?

Oct 4, 2004 11:53 AM

Actually, I was just trying it out to see if it would work & it worked the first time (lucky me). I've done it since & use the same shutter speed & same flashlight so I haven't really had any problems. I do have a Pelican Super Sabrelight that I'm pretty sure would require a different approach.


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