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Old Nov 16, 2006, 8:23 PM   #11
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Not at all, it's a lot more clear how they work thanks to you guys.

The one thing I'm curious about, though is how different shutter speeds affect a flash picture. You had mentioned setting it to 1/60 and Kalypso mentioned setting it to the sync speed.

I've enjoyed learning about the nuts and bolts of how the equipment works. It's kind of like a car. You can use a car to drive to work, or you can take a sunday drive through the mountains. But you have to be somewhat familiar with how to drive the car before you can effectively do either.
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Old Nov 16, 2006, 9:10 PM   #12
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Hi Curtis,

My D200 will sync up to 1/250th but using the studio lights I find that 1/60th works best for me. The sync speed is the fastest your camera will open and close the shutter without blocking the flash output. When a church is very dark I will use 1/30th @ F4.5 and ISO 1000 when using my SB-800 Nikon flash.Your camera manual will explain this to you. It will also suggest a shutter speed setting to use when using your flash. Studio lights are a different matter though. I find the perfect shutter speed for me is 1/60th, and the F-Stop @ F-8 to be really good for 99% on one or two people portraits when using a 75mm up lens. If I'm stuck in a small space I use 1/60th at F-20 or 22 to create more depth of field using a 35mm lens. I may at times have to increase my ISO to get these settings. After you get the basics down, You can try different things that will suit your style of shooting.

Remember, When using Studio lights you have to set your camera to manual mode because the automatic stuff just does not function at all. (including TTL) I have heard of trying to use the histogram on the camera to set strobes but I'm not sure if it is what I want for My portraits. I like to set My main,Hair & fill lights to be perfect. I just did portraits for A Church school and had to do 79 portraits in 1 1/2 hours. I set my strobes using a flash meter to my camera at 1/60th @ F-20 and every photograph came out perfect. All I had to do was size them to 5 X 7 and I put them on a Cd for them to have printed out. ( I could not use a hair light due to lack of room)

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Old Nov 17, 2006, 10:18 AM   #13
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Ronnie948 wrote:
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I find the perfect shutter speed for me is 1/60th, and the F-Stop @ F-8 to be really good for 99% on one or two people portraits when using a 75mm up lens. If I'm stuck in a small space I use 1/60th at F-20 or 22 to create more depth of field using a 35mm lens.
So if you use f8 for a 75mm+ lense, and f20 for a 35mm lense, what would you recommend for a 50mm lense? Something around f11?
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Old Nov 17, 2006, 11:56 AM   #14
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Depending on the subject I would say yes, F-11 would probably work just fine. It all depends on your lens quality. Testing is the only true way to learn exactly what you would want to use. At 35mm I just don't want any barrel distortion at all showing on my photograph so that is why I use F-20 @ 1/60th. When I do a bunch of portraits as I did the 79 portraits at church school I just leave the settings alone and do them all at F-20 even if I zoom the lens to 75mm for just two people I don't need to change anything. F-8 probably would have been OK for most of My Portraits but I wanted to take no chance of any distortion at all on any of them. My lights are powerful so I don't have any problems with not enought light.

Here are the portraits, Every photo is evenly lit and crystal clear. I only had 1 1/2 hours to do all of these portraits so I could not really meter every subject. I could only shoot one frame of each pose and if they closed their eyes or sneezed it was just to bad.

Ronnie

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Old Nov 28, 2006, 1:37 AM   #15
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Hi again, guys.

So the Interfit light meter that I bought off of ebay finally arrived today.

It seems to work like this. You set the dial to the speed film you are using, plug in the PC cord, fire the flash and the unit lights up an aperature setting. Aslo there are two LEDs that might light up labelled +1/3 stop and +2/3 stop.

The manual says:

"Once the flash has fired, the flashmeter will illuminate an LED behind the aperture (oh great, I've been mispelling that the whole time) scale on the dial. This indicates the nearest whole aperture number. If the flash power was within 1/3 of a stop of a whole aperture, this is all the indiciation necessary. If the flash was not a whole number, a second LED will light up to indicate +1/3 or +2/3 stop. This value must be added to the whole aperture to give the correct exposure."

So if I do this and the meter lights up the f5.6 aperture and also the +1/3 LED, how and what would I adjust? It's just a little confusing to me.




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