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Old Mar 8, 2007, 6:48 PM   #1
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Alright guys, time for a dumb question

Just wondering pros and cons of strobes vs. continuous.

I did some very quick searching on this forum and couldnt find any answers.

even if there is already a topic posted i will just read it if someone would post it.

I am considering a continuous set just for price right now but if strobes are that much better i would possibly go that way.

My first experiment will be helping a friend start a portfolio so i can take lots of pics and move the lights accordingly for different effects but just looking for some basic info. She is going to be posing with some motorcycles and cars as well as shots of just her, any info or suggestions greatly appreciated.
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 7:49 PM   #2
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 7:59 PM   #3
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What camera will you be using? Some cameras are difficult to sync with multiple strobes.

With continuous what you see is what you get so it is very easy to see the effects of moving the lights and to learn how to place the lights. Continuous lights also produce more heat which canbe more uncomfortable for the model (maybe you as well) and will be harder on the model's eyes.

The very inexpensive slave strobes do not have modeling lights so it can be very hard to know the effect of placement before hand. Even some that do have modeling lightsthe modeling lights are notperfectly predictive of the final results. Strobe also produce a high effective shutter speed which"stops"movement.

Since your plannedproject is to be a learning exercise I would build a continuousset of about 4/5 lights from the hardware store. Just make sure you can attach them securely while still being able to position/aim them. Also set your white balance on the head and shoulders of your model or a grey card in the model's position before you begin and lock it in.

After you have some practice you will know much better what you need for the long haul.

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Old Mar 8, 2007, 8:26 PM   #4
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Thanks kalypso/ A.C smith,

that info is really helpful

I will be using minolta 5d with 24-70 2.8 and 70-200 2.8 lenses for most of the shooting, also use my 50mm 1.7 lens.

I shoot mostly scenic and wildlife and have done so for about 6-7 years. I think this will be a fun time. fortunately this is her first work and mine as well so we are both learning. Any other feedback or general info you guys have will be greatly appreciated. Also one more question i keep reading about hair lights/lighting and although the name pretty much says itall what purpose does it serve and how do you position it or them.
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 10:12 AM   #5
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With that camera you should have no problems syncing with strobes when the time comes for you to go that route.

Hair light(s) are generally placed well above the model's head to produce tonality in the hair and at the same time separate the head from the background. They should normally be placed so that part of the hair visible to the camera is illuminated but no light from the hair light is falling on the model's face. Hence the light will typically be placed behind the plane of the face. The illumination level should be less (controlled by distance or output) than the level of the main lights. The idea is to help the hair frame the face rather than becoming the point of the picture.

A specially case of hair light is directly behind the model's head which produces a halo effect but probably you find find that effect useful for your planned shoot.

Shooting with the motorcycles probably won't me much of an issue but shooting the side of a car might present some challenges getting the illumination even enough for the entire length if you frame that way. If that's a problem you might want to avoid shooting the whole length of the car.
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Old Mar 9, 2007, 7:00 PM   #6
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thanks,

once again great info, I have one more question (atleast for now).

I am not big on editing, mostly to lazy. How can i get the effect of part of the pic in color and part in black and white. For example the one motorcycle is dark red with 4 aces on the gas tank and i would like to have the bike in color and everything else in black and white. Also possibly the bike in black and white except for the 4 aces.

Even if there is a company that will do the conversion for me that is fine also.

thanks in advance and any other info or suggestions welcome.


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