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Old Sep 30, 2007, 6:34 PM   #11
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Sometimes they come in kits (transmitter plus one or more receivers) and sometimes you'll see them both sold separately. Make sure the ones you buy are designed to work with each other if you buy them separately (or a transmitter/receiver kit plus extra receivers).

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Old Oct 1, 2007, 8:58 AM   #12
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Stu26beech:

In my setup, only 1 strobe needs the wireless receiver. The other flashes fire when they sense that the main flash fires. So, I've got the wireless transmitter on my camera, and the receiver plugged into the "main light". When the main light fires, the other 2 strobes see the flash and fire as well.
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Old Oct 1, 2007, 3:00 PM   #13
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Thank you again! I must say that this forum is one of the most helpful that I have ever experienced, and definitely my favourite photography site (and my only photography site).

One last one: we are considering continuous cool light instead of flashes as it has been recommended by one local UK retailer as being easier to set up and adjust to get the right settings for. We are completely agnostic other than we want to be able to take good quality photos with the least hassle.

So, does anyone think that continuous lighting has major disadvantages vs. flash? And if so, why?

Many thanks again.
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Old Oct 2, 2007, 6:00 AM   #14
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Power and color.
I'd stick with flash if i were you.
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Old Oct 2, 2007, 6:29 AM   #15
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I'll put in my opinion.

Continuous cool lights do have some advantages over strobes. The first being that you can see how the shadows will fall on the subject, and adjust the power accordingly to get the effect desired. I believe your D50 has the ability to over ride the automatic white balance; you'll need that if you're using cool lights. That, or a lot of post processing to adjust the color temperature. In my opinion, cool lights are easier to work with than strobes if you're a newbie. And, of course, you won't have to worry about wireless triggers or synch cords running everywhere either.

Of course, some will argue that strobes with modelling lights allow you to "see" what you're getting before you take the pictuer as well. My experience has been that's partially true; I've never gotten an exact correlation between modelling light level and strobe output level (Of course, all 3 of my strobes were less than $400 form eBay, so that's probably the reason). On the positive side, strobes will allow you, in my opinion, more flexibility and possibilities than cool lights.

Often, cost is a factor, and cool lights are often less expensive than strobes. You can always start off on cool lights and then move up to strobes if you want more.
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Old Oct 6, 2007, 10:46 AM   #16
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Hi again

Well, we splashed for flash rather than continuous, and went for 3 lights, one softbox, two deflected. I am just trying this out to figure out how to get the camera to behave with these new lights.

The RF triggers really work nicely, many thanks for all of your excellent advice.

Regards
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Old Oct 7, 2007, 5:01 PM   #17
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Congratulations with your purchase
Best would be to shoot in full manual (except focussing). It's trial and error if you don't use a light meter, so pherhaps write some working exposures down on paper for future reference.

Don't forget to post a shot if you want of course.
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Old Nov 4, 2007, 5:09 PM   #18
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I have a Nikon D 50 that I adore.
For the past day, 12 hours I have been trying to figure out how to trigger my slave properly timmed as in my old film days. Thought that it was me, every setting, every mode, all of the manuals on my D50. I went mental as my deadline approaches.
Then I went to the store and purchased an Digital Trigger, still it wouldn't work ??? This site answered it in 3 mins, without even posting.
You guys are Great !!!

I ended up using a small trigger light on top of the Nikon on it's lowest setting. As I belive that as with Radios I would loose a beautiful fill light all together, plus the addded weight. The Nikon SB usits are too pricy $ 550 for basicly one light ? My Vivitar 283 is equal to the task, and built to last, tuff.
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