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Old Dec 2, 2007, 11:19 PM   #1
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After reading a few different postshere talking about bouncing your flash off the celling, a thought (I do get them once in a while) came to mind. As I do agree that when bouncing light from a flash unit you need a strong flash. The question that came to mind was why bounce the light off the celling only? At home most celling are 8 to 10 feet high but ina church or other buildingsit is more like 15 to 20 feet high, that's going to require a lot of flash and battery power to shoot a subject say 15 feet from the photographer. Why not bounce the flash off a card mounted on top of the flash unit, that's what I use to do using a Vititar 283 flash unit (years ago) and it worked very well (for most shots). I tried looking around on the net but didn't see any flash units with a bounce card attachment (7''x9'') like my old Vititar 283. Do they still make or use something like that now days?

I found my 283 flash, now if I can just find the bounce attachment I'll post a picture of what I'm talking abut just in case I confessed anyone.
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Old Dec 3, 2007, 10:41 AM   #2
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Lumiquest makes a pocket bouncer that attaches to your flash head with velcro. Some flashes also have a built in bounce card that retracts in and out.
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Old Dec 3, 2007, 11:36 AM   #3
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I'll give that site a look, thanks.

Just took a look at the Lumiquest site, nice stuff, pretty much what I was looking to find.

Thanks,

Craig
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Old Dec 4, 2007, 8:35 AM   #4
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Be careful what camera you use that Vivitar on unless you know it's trigger voltage isn't too high (some of these had relatively high trigger voltages, which may damage some cameras).

Trigger Voltage Limits with Modern Digital Cameras

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Old Dec 4, 2007, 1:19 PM   #5
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JimC wrote:
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Be careful what camera you use that Vivitar on unless you know it's trigger voltage isn't too high (some of these had relatively high trigger voltages, which may damage some cameras).

Trigger Voltage Limits with Modern Digital Cameras
Not a problem there, as I'm only planning on using the 283 as a slave unit trigger by a remote. That is if the remote and flash will work with a digital camera. The remote is triggered by the light from the main flash, so no hard wire, no chance of damage to the camera. Of course that is if everything still works, it has been a while since I last use that flash system.
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Old Dec 4, 2007, 1:42 PM   #6
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Most digital cameras use a preflash to judge exposure. You don't get OTF (Off the Film) type metering with digital, due to the difference in sensor reflectivity compared to film.

So, a short preflash is used to judge the length of the main flash burst needed for proper exposure. This preflash occurs just before the mirror flips out of the way for the actual exposure.

As a result, most optical slaves will not work with digital (they'll fire on the preflash instead of the main flash).

You'll want an optical trigger that is designed for digital. Wein makes a "digtally aware" slave trigger. They're about $34.95 each, or B&H sells them by the 3 pack:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ut_Slave_.html[/user]

I'd probably just go with radio triggers instead.
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Old Dec 4, 2007, 3:05 PM   #7
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JimC,

As usually you are very informative, expense but informative. Though I was thinking of using everything in manual mode. I know that's a old trick use by those of us from film days and cameras with only a F-stop ring and shutter speed dial. If I can't get this to work I'll just get some dedicate flash units. That is as soon as the wife picks out my new camera for me.


As always I really do appreciate all the help form everyone given here at Steve's.
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Old Dec 5, 2007, 2:29 PM   #8
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I have been having good luck with a optical slave and a Nikon speedflash, with my Canon S3, in manual mode there is no pre flash.

I also have a Bower slave flash and it does work OK in auto mode or manual. It's about 60% the power of the Nikon.

I think all of the better Canon have a manual flash setting.

I can even use the high speed drive mode as long as I don't want the first shot, which uses the pre flash but the rest are fine. The camera flash takes longer to recharge that the slave so all is OK.


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Old Dec 13, 2007, 1:21 PM   #9
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Calicajun wrote:
Quote:
I found my 283 flash, now if I can just find the bounce attachment I'll post a picture of what I'm talking abut just in case I confessed anyone.
[align=left]This is a Vivitar with a StoFen bounce attachment. The LumiQuest Pocket Bouncer is another, larger, option.
[/align]
You said your flash has been unused for a while so you may have to "form" the capacitor. Put in fresh batteries, turn the unit on and let it sit for 15 minutes or so. Then pop off a dozen or so full-power flashes, letting the unti recharge between each pop.

--
Henry Posner
B&H Photo-Video
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Old Dec 13, 2007, 6:18 PM   #10
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Henryp,

The flashes you pictured look just like my old 283, only the bounce attachment it came with was about 4 to 5 times larger. Not sure if the larger size makes a difference but it did work well back in its' day. I did charge the 283 up and fired off a few test flashes (off the camera) and it seems to be working well.

BTW, does Vivitar still make flashes? Looked at WWW.vivitar.com but only saw a few small cameras.

Thanks,

Craig

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