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Old Oct 5, 2003, 2:40 PM   #1
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Default Need Help with lighting!

I need to take photos of various framed items. They are framed behind glass which makes things a little tough to avoid hotspots and glare. In the past we paid 3 different photographers, (2 of them supposedly) specialize in this kind of work. Their work was not great. They had glare, and or you could see their reflection in many of the pictures. I have been told that this should not be that big a deal by using lights on the side etc. What lights to I need. How do I prevent the reflection of me taking the pic? I saw this light box
Do I need 2 of these. I am shooting with a digital camera. Appreciate any ideas. Where should I go to buy these lights?

Rob
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Old Oct 5, 2003, 10:16 PM   #2
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Default

There are a few potential problem. You can avoid some glare by placing the lights well off axis. The problem comes from any illumination that falls on other objects in the room that reflect straight back to the camera. Is there a lot of ambient light in the room? can you cover the camera with a black cloth?

Your link doesn't work so I don't know what you're asking about. Also what kind of camera are you using?
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Old Oct 5, 2003, 11:05 PM   #3
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Default Lighting-glass

I have two cameras. One is a Sony Mavica CD400. The other canon s400. The lights that I saw are called soft boxes

I can put fabric in front of my camera as needed.

rob
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Old Nov 8, 2003, 9:43 PM   #4
BK
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Default glare

I guess i'm a little late but....Don't buy two softboxes. Get a book on photographing oil paintings. There are a few techniques that will work nicely. Get two tungsten lights that are also called hot lights. They need not be 3200K quartze tungsten halide. You can use the inexpensive clip on reflecters. The blue bulbs are balanced for daylight film. When shooting digital, you can color correct in Photoshop. Now the fun stuff..If You are going to do alot of this kind of shooting. You need to get two polarizing filters. Not the kind that fit over the lens. They are like gel filters. They are about 12 by 12 inches and have a cardboard mount around the edges (like king size slide mounts) They will have arrows on them indicating the axis. You want the axis arrows in the horizontal. Hang up your glass framed picture on the wall. Place your two light stands on either side of the picture. Preferably at an angle approximating 45 I prefer a little less. The light paths cross over your picture (subject). Aim them so that the center of the (camera right) light is is a little to the left of the left edge of the subject. The (camera left) light center (hot spot) should be past the right edge of the subject. These lights should be further rather than close to the subject. I would suggest 6 feet or more. The Polarizer Filters are placed in front of the lights. (Not too close or they will melt) Too far and the cardboard mount will cast its shadow on the subject. The lights have to be equal in intesity. Use of an incident light meter determines this. This "setup" will eliminate the glare. Now a Polarizing filter that fits on the lens will also help but You can get by without one. You will definately need a tripod. I also use a large piece of black velvet with a hole in it for the lens to shoot through. Black side facing the subject. Shut off all other room lights. This is the correct way. This is not easy to do properly. I used to specialize in this type of photography.
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Old Nov 8, 2003, 10:03 PM   #5
BK
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Default The easy way

Another method that will get acceptable results is to shoot them outside shortly after sunset or on an overcast day (shadowless light) Get a large black card with a hole large enough for your lens to shoot through and set your tripod and camera slightly to the left or right of the center of your subject. This will prevent the reflection of the camera however the subject may "keystone" slightly. This can be corrected in Photoshop. Or you could have the subject plane not be exactly paralell to the lens plane. Slightly is the key. Too much will give you a trapezoid instead of a rectangle. "keystone" The real answer is depending on your quality standards. To do this correctly it might be cheaper to get a real photographer to give you a sample of his skill by shooting one of them on speculation. Good luck..Hope this helps..bk
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Old Nov 8, 2003, 10:08 PM   #6
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Default Re: glare

Quote:
Originally Posted by BK
I guess i'm a little late but....Don't buy two softboxes. Get a book on photographing oil paintings. There are a few techniques that will work nicely. Get two tungsten lights that are also called hot lights. They need not be 3200K quartze tungsten halide. You can use the inexpensive clip on reflecters. The blue bulbs are balanced for daylight film. When shooting digital, you can color correct in Photoshop. Now the fun stuff..If You are going to do alot of this kind of shooting. You need to get two polarizing filters. Not the kind that fit over the lens. They are like gel filters. They are about 12 by 12 inches and have a cardboard mount around the edges (like king size slide mounts) They will have arrows on them indicating the axis. You want the axis arrows in the horizontal. Hang up your glass framed picture on the wall. Place your two light stands on either side of the picture. Preferably at an angle approximating 45 I prefer a little less. The light paths cross over your picture (subject). Aim them so that the center of the (camera right) light is is a little to the left of the left edge of the subject. The (camera left) light center (hot spot) should be past the right edge of the subject. These lights should be further rather than close to the subject. I would suggest 6 feet or more. The Polarizer Filters are placed in front of the lights. (Not too close or they will melt) Too far and the cardboard mount will cast its shadow on the subject. The lights have to be equal in intesity. Use of an incident light meter determines this. This "setup" will eliminate the glare. Now a Polarizing filter that fits on the lens will also help but You can get by without one. You will definately need a tripod. I also use a large piece of black velvet with a hole in it for the lens to shoot through. Black side facing the subject. Shut off all other room lights. This is the correct way. This is not easy to do properly. I used to specialize in this type of photography.
You are not too late. I am still working on this and have not purchased the equipment yet. Any ideas should I get the polarizing filters and or equipment you suggest. On the filters, any links on the net to what you are writing about? I am not trying to be dead on perfect but rather to shoot something that isnt loaded with glare and hot spots. Appreciate your tips and suggestions...

Robert
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