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Old Dec 26, 2008, 7:08 AM   #1
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I have a Canon Rebel XT and just gota basiclighting kit with 2 umbrellas and a softbox for Christmas. The problem I am having is when I take a photo the studio lights flash just after the picture is taken, of course resulting in nothing more than the lighting from the built in flash. What am I doing wrong and/or do I need to get some device that makes the two compatible?
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Old Dec 26, 2008, 9:18 AM   #2
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Your built in flash should be disabled, and there should be some connectivity between your camera and at least 1 of the flashes. Usualy flash packages come with a cord that connects to your camera's hot shoe to one of your flash units. Another solution is a remote flash trigger. This allows you to move around more freely without having your camera connected to a flash unit. Hope this helps.
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Old Dec 27, 2008, 6:09 AM   #3
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In general, DSLR's trigger some sort of a "pre-flash" regardless of how the pop-up is set. What happens is that the studio strobes react to this pre-flash and by the time the main flash fires, your studio strobes are recycling and will not fire.

Yes, the camera must "communicate" with the strobes but using another medium--a shoe-mounted accessory flash or "pc-adapter" mounted on the hot shoe itself. Be aware though of "trigger voltage" before doing this.

Another good way to do this and not worry about "trigger voltage" is to have a dedicated flash unit mounted on the camera to fire your strobes.

Just set the shoe mounted flash to M and use the lowest power ratio setting to minimum--this will be enough to trigger your strobes in a closed environment.

A more expensive way to do this is to get one of those Radio Triggers/receiver set ups.

Hope that helps.
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Old Dec 28, 2008, 7:38 AM   #4
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Abs.Abando wrote:
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In general, DSLR's trigger some sort of a "pre-flash" regardless of how the pop-up is set. What happens is that the studio strobes react to this pre-flash and by the time the main flash fires, your studio strobes are recycling and will not fire.


Another good way to do this and not worry about "trigger voltage" is to have a dedicated flash unit mounted on the camera to fire your strobes.

Just set the shoe mounted flash to M and use the lowest power ratio setting to minimum--this will be enough to trigger your strobes in a closed environment.

A more expensive way to do this is to get one of those Radio Triggers/receiver set ups.
That is exactly what it is doing. Now where do I go about finding one of these dedicated flash units? Do I need to buy one specifically for the Rebel XT or a Canon brand, or will there be options?
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Old Dec 28, 2008, 9:14 PM   #5
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In lieu of "dedicated" units, you can check out some after-market "optical" triggers. I have one with the flash tube under a heavy red filter. They're designed to be used with the optical slaves on the studio strobes and they come really cheap(around $30-$50). They work on 2-AA batteries and are good for about 200 pops/set of alkalines.

What's good about this set up is that there is no direct connection to the strobes which may cause "trigger voltage" problems. Another plus to this is that although the instructions say it's good to about 8-meters, if you're shooting in a confined environment of a studio, you should be good up to about 10m. Just don't expect the same results outdoors as optical slaves need to "see" what's triggering them.

I'm sure these aren't that hard to find. The brand I use is Morris. I'm sure they're available online or at a camera store near you.

If you have a little more cash to spend then you can go for those "radio transceiver" thingies that work on RF signals to trigger the strobes. The nice thing about these are that they work even outdoors since your packs or monoblocks will be tuned in to the frequency in which your trigger transmits and they're not "blinded" by strong sunlight.
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