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Old Nov 30, 2010, 12:13 PM   #1
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Default Changing Lighting Intensity

I am researching studio lighting equipment, specifically continuous lighting. My goal is to not break the bank so I've been looking at reasonably priced kits. I like Britek but I'm not really finding any lights where I can dial the intensity up or down. My question is, and please forgive me if this is a dumb question because I'm just learning about studio lighting, if I need to change the intensity (f-stop) of the light do I just move the light forward or backward? It just seems like a lot of work to move the lights and meter every time.

Any advice would be appreciated or any advice about Britek.

Thanks!
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Old Dec 1, 2010, 1:27 AM   #2
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Move closer to increase the f-stop
To decrease the light intensity move the light further out
(notice the contrast also changes...)

-> This follows the simple inverse square rule so you may not have to meter every time

Last edited by NHL; Dec 1, 2010 at 1:49 AM.
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Old Dec 1, 2010, 4:54 AM   #3
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whats your budget I know with strobes you can dial the intensity.
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Old Dec 1, 2010, 7:02 AM   #4
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FYI - the inverse square law still applies regardless of your strobe having an adjustment dial or not:
http://www.viewfindercenter.com/news...otography.html
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Old Dec 1, 2010, 12:15 PM   #5
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Thank you very much for your response. That is what I thought but I didn't want to assume that. My budget is around $1000 and I've been looking to buy used equipment but we may buy new since what I have been looking at his been pretty reasonable.

I will be setting up a small aquarium, placing fish in the aquarium, and photographing them. We had a well known Chinese photographer take some pictures for us and he used continuous lighting, 2 umbrellas, and a fill light, so the owner of my company wants me to replicate that. I have been looking at fluorescent lights as they are cooler and don't use as much electricity. I have been looking at Britek and a company called Steve Kaeser and both seem to be pretty reasonable.

Thanks again for your help.
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Old Dec 1, 2010, 1:48 PM   #6
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Bear in mind when looking at fluorescent is their limited output will fix their longest distance, so your best bet is by moving the lights closer...

A strobe is much more powerful even though it only comes on for a short duration, their modeling may help a bit in controlling the shadows if you're worried; however you'll have more distance (and contrast) to work with!
-> This might explain why you can dial down with strobes, whereas with fluorescents they are always set at maximum intensity

Last edited by NHL; Dec 1, 2010 at 2:05 PM.
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