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Old Sep 11, 2004, 9:39 PM   #31
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You need the "Wein Safe Sync HSHSBD" , this fits on your hot shoe giving you a PC terminal. After sliding it on your hotshoe, put your camera in manual, set your aperature and shutter speed and fire away. I use this with my Canon G5 and studio lights and it works fine. This wein safe sync retails for about $60
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Old Sep 11, 2004, 10:46 PM   #32
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flint350 wrote:
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Hmmm.....you sure? Unless I misread you, ... At least, that's my understanding of it.
That's correct: http://www.lightingmagic.com/bkgndqa...n%20background

... I've made the same recommendation a month ago to MinutePhotos:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...41&forum_id=54
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Old Sep 11, 2004, 11:23 PM   #33
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You do not need the"Wein Safe sync" with Alien Bees because the sync voltage is only 6 volts the same as the Canon Digital Rebel.I think somehead and pack systems have 6 - 12 volt sync systems which can damage digital cameras. This problem doesn't exist with ABmono strobes.

I agree I could have saved money, but I don't think the second stobe is where I would do this.Looking back, I wish I had gotten the second strobe before the light meter.With thelight meter I still have to do the same checks of LCD / histogram and additonal adjustments.I need to learn how to dial in meter to camera better right now it overexposes. I decided on second AB800 so that I could use the same scale for ratio's 1/2 , 1/4 etc. on power adjuster.

I am taking the advice I received in this forum that you should have at least two flash heads and a good light meter to develope as a photographer. Through my minimal experience I can see where this base set of tools could come in handy. I am sure I will invest in reflectors eventually, but they are not high on my list.

I do like the interfit IR wireless to trigger stobes. The PC /Hotshoe adapter has the tendancy to slip out of possition and not fire the strobes. It is important that every shoot I go on I do a great job so I can develope referal bussiness. Plus the AB's are cheap compared to other systems Ilooked at or Canon Wireless flash E-ttl systems.
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 12:09 AM   #34
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MinutePhotos

Try metering the above set-up...:? The author has definetly picked a good example with both shadow and highlight... as well as some mid-tone skin. This combination will definetly take your meter for a spin especially on where the main strobe is placed!
Some folks can be poo-pooing the histogram all day, but you'll definetly need it here



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Plus the AB's are cheap compared to other systems I looked at or Canon Wireless flash E-ttl systems
You've forgotten the Sigma EF500DG Super again :-)
They'll do everything the 550EX/ST-E2 does for 1/2 the cost plus they can be slaved to your Alien Bee with full ratio/manual control with their built-in slave!

... and you can still have the Canon's automatic E-TTL option when used wirelessly without the Alien Bees: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...m_id=37&page=2
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 2:27 AM   #35
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Well NHL I have done some calculations in comparing the savings of purchasing the Sigma 500 DG Super rater than another AB800.

Tha AB800 with Light stand, Strobe, Umbrella, Sync cord and light bag is $359.00

The Sigma 500 DG Super (150.00), with stand, sync cord, PC hot shoe, umbrella, mounting equpiment for light to stand and umbrella to stand will run roughly $259.00

So we are talking about $100.00 savings. However, I will still be limitedon diffusers, softboxes, honeycombs, gels, barndoors, and other atachments I could use with Sigma 500.

With that in mind, I would still prefer to have the strobe. Faster, more power, more reliable (no batteries) etc. I want to be able to explore with different types of light modifiers to develope my photography style. That is why I am leaning towards more power and standard stobes and mounts.

Sorry for the size of the photo was too tired to resize to smaller. But I think good photos are priceless and I spare no expense to get the best possible photos for my customers. (within reason or course). So the difference of $100.00 bucks is no big deal for the added benifits and power of real studio strobe.

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Old Sep 12, 2004, 2:57 AM   #36
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Here is another fun photo I took both of these picture are shot using the Canon 420EX flash and the 18-55mm kit lens on the Canon Digital Rebel. I am happy with the Canon 420EX for what I use it for but want real Studio Lights for Portrait work. I was going to invest in L -seres Canon lens, but I have discovered better lighting will make more of an improvement on photos than better lenses.
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 7:46 AM   #37
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Didn't we discuss this before : http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...08&forum_id=54
NHL wrote:
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There's a reason as to why they call Studio strobes: They belong in the Studio. You may think it's portable with a DC supply, but you still need a case for each head, bags for the stands, umbrella/reflectors, and the power cord/Vagabond to carry around in a minivan. It also takes time to set-up (and tear down).

Three 550EX/500DG with their Lumiquest diffusers fit nicely in the same camera bag (and they come with built-in stand)! Granted the Alien Bees will have more power, but does it matter if you are shooting one/two persons in a small room or away from the studio?

You can still be creative since both system will do ratio, but much more convenient and easier with wireless E-TTL though. You may have wireless feature with the Pocket Wizard, but don't you need to re-compute manually? What happen when you change a stand location (or the composition)?
With E-TTL you just move the secondary head (or heads) and the camera will meter correctly for the new position, or you can vary their ratio all from the camera (and watching the strobing modeling lamps) :?

Do both, I did...
1. The EF500DG Super's come with their own foot (ie subtract the stand!)
2. The http://www.lumiquest.com/ are probably less than umbrella/holder/bracket and more convenient too.
3. Battery is good - much more portable than a Vagabond. As to recycle time: How big is the studio? You'll also find with mutiple heads the flashes do not have to put out as much as individually and they'll recycle faster as well.
Also you can run on them cheap and powerful NiMh rechargeable which could be too fast for their own good at the risk of melting them up!
4. Wireless E-TTL (no meter required)


Remember it's just two different approaches... You're just favoring one over the other. I rather keep my options open and...
5. The Sigma's will sync-up to your Alien Bees with full manual/ratio control too (unlike the 420EX!)
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 10:13 AM   #38
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minutephotos:
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I do like the interfit IR wireless to trigger stobes.
I'd be careful with this unit. It is supposedly rated at a safe voltage of about 6V, BUT - several people, myself included, accepted this andbought one - However, we measured the trigger voltage with a meter and all of us found voltages from 9-12V. My unit measured consistently at 12V, which is double the limitation that Canon gives for its digital cameras (My 10D).
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 11:27 AM   #39
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However, we measured the trigger voltage with a meter and all of us found voltages from 9-12V. My unit measured consistently at 12V, which is double the limitation that Canon gives for its digital cameras (My 10D).
Darn, at $35.00 I was going to order it today from adorama... I don't understand how trigger voltage works. Why would it need to be so high if the triggereing is done from unit to strobe with IR? Do you still use the unit or did you get rid of it?

What do you guys think about this unit, is this better choice than the Interfit unti?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&category=30087&item= 3835650860

Man NHL you are up early arn't you. You are correct we are going in circles on this topic. Once I set my mind to something I can be pretty determimed. :P.

I don't make money on my mobile freelance business, so ambient light or fill flash (420EX) is fine. I make money on my by appointment shoots, where I create a portable studio. The factor I think you are leaving out NHL is appearance. I am trying to generate a customer base so "looking" like a profesional is just as important to me as my photos looking great. No offense, but I just don't think a bunch of small flashes sitting on the supplied foot mount "looks professional".My competition is 1-hour photos, shopping mall studio's, and Sears who all use strobes. The difference is I come to you and can perform my service in your house or back yard.

Potential models love being in front of studio strobes it makes them feel like they are in a real photo shoot. Some have never seen a light meter test,this test gives me the opportunity to get close and personal and helps build confidence between me and the model. The person paying for the photoshoot alsofeels as though they are getting their money's worth. They know the equipment is expensive and even though they may own a DRebel themselves they still hire me. :-)

Don't get me wrong, I definately appreciate all of you help and I listen to advice (sometimes). However, I disagree that Mono Lightsonly belong in a studio. I can't wait to get outdoors with my Mono Lights, I believe this will generate a lot of new business. Why else would that make a light meter than can read both ambient and flash simutaneously?
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Old Sep 12, 2004, 6:45 PM   #40
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OK

Can someone point me to where this 6V requirement comes from? Don't tell me it came from measuring the flash, because I have Canon's own units which measured higher than this!

From my search this article was the most prominent: http://www.botzilla.com/photo/G1strobe.html#ISO
... and toward the end, there's a footnote:
"Recently, Rupert Vogl gave a ring to Metz and asked about strobe voltages. He was directed by them to the DIN/ISO Standards Doc #10330, which you can get as a .pdf from the ISO or the American Standards Institute for a paltry $46.

According to ISO 10330 (1992), "Photography — Synchronizers, ignition circuits and connectors for cameras and photoflash units — Electrical characteristics and test methods," strobe voltages up to 24V should be generally permitted. If Canon complies with the standard, then many questionable strobes, with trigger voltages ranging from 6V to 24V, should be considered quite safe with any Powershot camera. I'm now waiting for an answer from Canon about why they specify a much lower required value (so does Nikon, at 12V... maybe ISO 10330 is a "toothless" standard?). Canon's spec goes back a lot earlier than 1992, that much is certain... but any camera that complies with ISO 9000 should also comply with ISO 10330, and a gentleman from Canon Japan is the convener for that particular ISO working group....

Still, more phone calls to Canon USA reiterate their insistence that 6V is the limit for the G1 and EOS cameras.- kb 20 Feb 2001

Meanwhile, in Sept 2001:
"There is not a maximum voltage requirement for the hot shoe terminal on the PowerShot G1." - Canon Canada Tech Support EMail"




I've checked both the 10D and the DRebel web's and manuals and could not find any reference to this max limit! The only reference I could find on the 10D was "Do not use a high voltage flash on the Hot shoe. It migh not fire" which is similar to a FAQ on an older EOS: http://www.usa.canon.com/EOS-1D/faqs.html
Q: Can the EOS-1D utilize high-voltage flash units?
A: When connecting via sync port, avoid using flash units with voltages higher than 250V, which may damage the EOS-1D. Also, high-voltage flash units may fail to emit light when mounted on the accessory shoe.


and also:
Q: Is the sync terminal sensitive to sync cable polarity? Is polarity a problem with the sync terminal?
A: No.


Now forward to 2004: http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/ca...04_20d_pr.html
A semiconductor switch replaces the traditional sync contacts, ending scorching and frictional wear while at the same time increasing the limit for trigger circuit voltage to 250V

IMO I can't imagine any company doing business in the EU and not complying with the ISO 9000's... Even us American Co. do!
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