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Old Sep 7, 2004, 7:37 PM   #1
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Does anyone know which model of"Wein Safe Sync" will allow me to use my Canon G5 with my studio lights ? I tried the hot shoe to hot shoe model and it doesn't work. I noticed the have several different models available but they don't say which models are compatable with what camera .... Help !
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 8:24 PM   #2
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http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm

The first one should work, the second one (HS to HS with pc) also. May be you shoud contact them to know why it didn't work in your case.
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Old Sep 7, 2004, 10:36 PM   #3
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Watch for out for the shutter speed 1/60s usually work, but faster speeds may not work with combination of long cables!

... KCan can certainly go into transistors, RC and time constant, etc... :idea:
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 12:18 AM   #4
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ah rite, I had some consideration about that with my MFI2 , you have real good memory
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 9:14 AM   #5
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Remember there's extra circuits in that Wein that depends on the higher voltage to work properly!

... KCan as technical people we know that any exposed terminal will have to be protected for antistatic (ie in the kV), but most consumer won't. It's also the current combination.
Folks tend to be paranoid and overbuy things that they might not need -> Not a good idea just to buy for protection when in reality there's a limiting factor when any regular hot-shoe to PC adapter will work just fine... :-)
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 4:03 PM   #6
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NHL wrote:
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Folks tend to be paranoid and overbuy things that they might not need -> Not a good idea just to buy for protection when in reality there's a limiting factor when any regular hot-shoe to PC adapter will work just fine...
*IF* (and that's a big "if") you KNOW that the studio strobe(s) or flash you are connecting to is in the safe voltage range for your camera, then your advice is valid...but if you don't know, a Safesync doesn't hurt...a lot cheaper than paying to have your camera fixed as this type of damage wouldn't be covered under warranty.
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 5:31 PM   #7
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Mikefellh wrote:
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...but if you don't know, a Safesync doesn't hurt
... but will it fire on an already low power signal at the end of a long cable? That is the question. I'm sure the device will work fine as intended on high voltage lines. :-)

I'm also certain that you are aware of the static when one walks around with the camera strapping along one's side that the chances of potentially zapping thoses terminals with high-voltage electrostatics are much more prevalent than someone using a studio strobe. A good designer would think about thoses little details, wouldn't you especially from an established manufacturers with many years of building cameras? I can't imagine the # of field returns otherwise...
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 8:54 PM   #8
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Cameras up to a few years ago had a mechnical flash switch that would fire at 1/60 or 1/120. Today's cameras use electronic switches which although could fire at any shutter speed, it doesn't like high voltage or reverse polarity. For instance, Canon specifies no more than 6v for its cameras inluding the EOS...check out this page and read what they say:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/G1strobe.html

A friend of mine who has a friend who repairs cameras is swamped with Nikon SLRs from people who plugged in either a strobe or flash with a high trigger voltage without thinking.
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 10:04 PM   #9
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May be your friend should buy a Canon instead!
"A semiconductor switch replaces the traditional sync contacts, ending scorching and frictional wear while at the same time increasing the limit for trigger circuit voltage to 250V" http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/ca...04_20d_pr.html :-):-):-)
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Old Sep 8, 2004, 11:04 PM   #10
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You didn't even look at the link I posted, did you? The link I posted WAS talking about Canon, in this case the Canon G1...AND the person who started this thread is a Canon G5 owner. The press release you posted is for a different class of camera, so of course it's built more robust.
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