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Old Sep 24, 2004, 11:33 PM   #1
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I'm thinking of starting a thread on portrait lighting that didn't cost the price of a Studio. (I don't have one & couldn't afford one either). Anybody interested? Here's an example of what I mean:



Lighting was a Vivitar 285HV at 1/2 power reflected into a 42" silver umbrella 45% to her left front & a 60" white umbrella directly in front reflecting a 100W Norman strobe (I bought on Ebay for less than 1/3 of it's original cost).
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 12:40 AM   #2
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yup me for one as i am very interested , but you probably already knew that..lol
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 1:55 AM   #3
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Very nice, let's share some secret's .

1.
Instead of a reflector I most of the time use a 250w flash which I bounce of a darkgrey wall or curtain, the reason is simple I can really adjust the ammount of bounce from almost nothing to 1/5th of a flash on it's lowest setting.

2.
Instead of a reflector I sometimes use a rescue blanket (almost free) on which I bounce, one side is silver one side is gold, no examples yet sorry.

3.
When working with blackbackdrops and softboxes and I can't move far enough from the backdrop to get no lightspill I use a large carton to blank the softbox on one side and move it to the side of the model and place another one on the other side, I use the bounced flash from 1 for the fillin on the top.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 10:09 AM   #4
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as most people herei like the idea.exchange of knowleadge and ideas canhelp us to atcheive better results.

thanks,

zoran
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 11:51 AM   #5
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Does this beautiful gal remind anyone of Ann-Margret besides me?
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 8:18 PM   #6
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Frank Doorhof wrote:
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Very nice, let's share some secret's .

1. Instead of a reflector I most of the time use a 250w flash which I bounce of a darkgrey wall or curtain, the reason is simple I can really adjust the ammount of bounce from almost nothing to 1/5th of a flash on it's lowest setting.

2. Instead of a reflector I sometimes use a rescue blanket (almost free) on which I bounce, one side is silver one side is gold, no examples yet sorry.

3. When working with blackbackdrops and softboxes and I can't move far enough from the backdrop to get no lightspill I use a large carton to blank the softbox on one side and move it to the side of the model and place another one on the other side, I use the bounced flash from 1 for the fillin on the top.

Greetings,
Frank
Sounds good Frank, but I was thinking more about folks posting an image & providing the lighting info with it (so people can get an idea of how it was made). Like:


Clamp reflector with a 150W halogen hot light to my immediate upper right & about 25 degrees to her left...reflected off of a ceiling/wall corner. Another 150W halogen clamp light mounted on a stand & shooting through a 42" white translucent umbrella.

BTW, good idea on using the rescue blanket...I can see that being a huge plus in outdoors shade if it's placed under the front of your subject!! When I was getting my feet wet, I found some car windshield reflectors work pretty well to! Since then, I've bought & used a 42" 5-in-1 reflector disc that provides a LOT more reflection (plus it's silver/gold/white/translucent or black in one 12 inch disc when folded down.
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 10:46 PM   #7
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Greetings;

Ok, I'm just trying to wrap my head around that picture. While I have known people with eyes that are two different colours, I've never seen it that dramatic before. I know that it is easily done with photoshop, so I guess it's really no big deal. It seems a little dramatic to me, but if that is what you were trying to accomplish, the comment shold be "well done". It did make me think.

Very nice composition and lighting, by the way.

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Sep 26, 2004, 3:50 AM   #8
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On the right side a 400W flash with barndoors and grid slightly behind the model and slight above (arround 1/5th output).
On the left side a 250W flash with snoot and grid pointed from middle position towards the back of the model (very low on output)

And one flash 250W with standard reflector pointed at a dark grey wall bouncing some fill in light on the model.

The shot was arranged very carefully so that there would be some lens flare from the right flash making it like there is a beam of light coming to the model.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Sep 26, 2004, 1:10 PM   #9
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Kalypso, I was going to PM you about setting up a thread or section in regards to this very subject.

In my opinion, I would like to see the photo, with a description of the lighting and maybe even a photo of the lighting setup if people have it or wish to share it. I think this would be a big asset to a lot of aspiring portrait photographers.

Tom - That model of Kalypso's is Jess. Hedoes a great job a photographing her. And if memory serves me right, her eyes are actually two different colors.

One last thing, when you guys are taking these photos, say the one posted with Jess. Are there no other light sorces in the room? Meaning, the room is completely dark except for the"studio" lights?
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Old Sep 26, 2004, 2:54 PM   #10
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RyanH wrote:
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Tom - That model of Kalypso's is Jess. He does a great job a photographing her. And if memory serves me right, her eyes are actually two different colors.

One last thing, when you guys are taking these photos, say the one posted with Jess. Are there no other light sorces in the room? Meaning, the room is completely dark except for the "studio" lights?
My studio is ususally just a wall in a bedroom that I hang backdrops from. There is some light coming in from some closed blinds, but it really doesn't effect the images. If I'm shooting fine art or figure work, I would choose a location that had zero light other than the those I chose (like Franks lighting in his image above).

Yes, Jess has one green & one brown eye...very cool too! Color depth & saturation depends on the light & angle to it.


Lighting was one 150W halogen clamp light reflecting off of a 42" silver umbrella, above & to her left at about 45 degrees to her front. Front light was a 100W halogen clamp light reflecting off of a 42" umbrella, slightly above eye level & about 3ft away.
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