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Old Feb 21, 2005, 4:21 PM   #1
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I have the Canon 10D, and a set of twin Elinchrom 500 lights - please could someone tell me what is the best white balance setting to use for these? Flash seems to leave everything a little pink.

Also I've been taught to meter the key light to F11 and fill to F8 then have the camera set at F11 at a 60th but these lights just seem way too powerful for the high key studio stuff I'm trying to do - is there a way to reduce the power (some filters for the lights? Or do I just have to close down the aperture as I have been doing? (I'm using a smallish softbox and white umbrella).

Thanks alot for any advice - I'm fairly new to all this so still climbing that steep learning curve.
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Old Feb 21, 2005, 4:51 PM   #2
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I have not had this problem, but I shoot RAW and adjust after the fact, generally set conversion to either flash or daylight balance, and adjust tint as needed.

On the 10D you can probably move your shutter up to 1/250, at 1/60 you still can pick up some ambient lighting.

If you can, moving the lights twice as far away will reduce the light intensity by a factor of 4. And you have set the strobe to its minimum power? I believe for that model it can be dialed down 3 stops, to 1/4 power.

F8/F11 is a relatively flat lighting ratio, How are you lighting the background? For high-key like white on white, it will need a good dose of light too.


Peter.
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Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:52 AM   #3
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Thanks alot for that Peter, I do have it pretty much at it's lowest. Everything I have read pretty much says 1 stop between key & fill - what would you suggest?

I'm currently not lighting the background separately, I'm not mad on the idea of spending too much more to light the background - seems to be OK with the lights positioned fairly close both at 45 degrees more or less. I've read somewhere that a normal halogen lamp will do the job of lighting the background but I've generally not found a huge amount of info on high key lighting so any advice would be much appreciated
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Old Feb 22, 2005, 11:47 PM   #4
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chris72 wrote:
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Thanks alot for that Peter, I do have it pretty much at it's lowest. Everything I have read pretty much says 1 stop between key & fill - what would you suggest?

I'm currently not lighting the background separately, I'm not mad on the idea of spending too much more to light the background - seems to be OK with the lights positioned fairly close both at 45 degrees more or less. I've read somewhere that a normal halogen lamp will do the job of lighting the background but I've generally not found a huge amount of info on high key lighting so any advice would be much appreciated
PeterP is correct about the benefits of shooting RAW. Halogen hot lights do a fine job of lighting up backgrounds, hair & many other things. But, their color is different than those of your strobes. Strobes normally will balance out at 5000-5100K (or the Flash/Daylight settings of your camera). Halogen hot-lights will balance out somewhere between 3100-3600K (usually 3200K, or the Incandescent setting for White Balance).
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Old Feb 23, 2005, 3:17 PM   #5
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Thanks Kalypso, so would it cause problems to use the strobes for the main & fill & then use halogen hotlamps for the background?

Probably best to use all the same sort of lights for everything instead of mix as it will be impossible to get everything the right colour?
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Old Feb 23, 2005, 8:39 PM   #6
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I might suggest using one strobe for the background, and the other on your subject with a piece of foamcore on the other side to handle the fill.

If you are already at min power the only way to reduce power further is to move the lights farther away. Or use a gel, but good gels are not cheap and not usually neutral.

What are you trying to shoot? People can be done all kinds of ways right from 1/1 on down to the limit of your recording medium. All kinds of effects are possible and the results are immediately visible with digital :-). Experimentation is half the fun.

:blah:Actually, I don't think I have ever heard anyone complain of too much power before. Usually it is the other way around. :blah:

Peter.

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Old Mar 29, 2005, 12:51 PM   #7
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Hi, I have been teaching photography for 25 years and is still part of the old school, I was also doing aerial photography in the South African Air force for 20 years and has done more than 1000 weddings over the last 20 years. (Just a short back round)



Sorry to give you bad news but the problem is with the metering system of the EOS10D. I Bought two of them and sold them before I took one photograph with the second camera. The CCD on those cameras haven't got the saturation capabilities of what a good 400ASA film can offer you.



email me for more info [email protected]




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