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Old Apr 19, 2005, 9:37 PM   #1
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http://www.fredmiranda.com/A13_Daschund/

I was on this web site and I was supprosed at the photography and the equipment used. "A lot of my photos are taken with two or three soft boxes (actually, a bunch of Home Depot halogen working lights through two or three diffusers). "

So is this the Cheapest way to get started into studio work??? IF so how can I get teh soft lighting that this guy did out of Halpgen working lights.



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Old Apr 20, 2005, 6:08 PM   #3
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...being lazy is a wonderful thing.....



J/k

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Old Apr 24, 2005, 8:57 PM   #4
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I use 30 watt (equavalent to 150 watt) compact flourescent lamps mounted in those little "chicken lamp" fixtures (they have a clamp and a cheap aluminum bowl reflector).

I paid about 90 cents for theCFC bulbsat Building 19, and about two dollars for each for the clamping fixtures.

Then I drape some muslin cloth over them, to diffuse them.

Add to that a little daylight or whatever available light there is, and I got a cheap set of lights ($5 for two lamps not including the cost of the cloth).

I got this idea from a major television lighting designer. She helps out on a lot of low budget video/film when not doing her day job. She always recommends the chicken lamps.

-- Terry
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Old Apr 24, 2005, 11:59 PM   #5
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Yes, those Compact Fluorescents are great for that, you can diffuse them easily with cloth. Something that you have to be careful with when using halogens. The extreme heat from halogens can be a fire hazard if something flammable contacts them.

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Old Apr 25, 2005, 7:57 AM   #6
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So, I'm curious, as I have some halogens myself. What is the advantage of halogen lighting vs. using the florescents as you've described. I do like the halogens but they certainly are HOT. I'd hate to walk away and forget to turn them off one day. Thanks!
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Old Apr 25, 2005, 7:40 PM   #7
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The CFL's are bright and cool, but the halogens are brighter and HOT, not bad in the cold of winter:-)

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Old May 10, 2005, 12:32 PM   #8
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For additional info on CFL lighting set ups. Check out www.sell-it-on-the-net.com and look at the ALZO line:

http://sell-it-on-the-net.com/online...nuous_cool.htm
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Old May 10, 2005, 10:10 PM   #9
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With compact fluorescents, the light spectrum is discontinuous, and you may get some odd problems with colors, especially flesh tones. This is also a problem with other types of lights, such as low and high pressure sodium, and mercury vapor. Using custom white balance will not always cure these problems. Halogen lights radiate in a continuous spectrum.

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