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Old Aug 21, 2005, 2:23 PM   #1
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I have an Interfit studio flash light. With the meter I can get a believable reading, but I get few high readings. When I connect my Nikon D70 with a (bought it used) Nikon pc adapter, I get overexposed pictures, so I have to take rapid shots so the light doesn't have time to fully charge. The light is on a low setting at this point (~1/8 of full bright), so I'm led to believe that the light is being allowed to overcharge. Could it be the pc adapter capacitor is bad? I can't belive that it's the fuse on the light, but is there a capacitor in the light that can be replaced? I am confused by the fact that the meter usually gets believable readings.
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Old Aug 23, 2005, 6:38 PM   #2
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kaoslb wrote:
Quote:
I have an Interfit studio flash light. With the meter I can get a believable reading, but I get few high readings. When I connect my Nikon D70 with a (bought it used) Nikon pc adapter, I get overexposed pictures, so I have to take rapid shots so the light doesn't have time to fully charge.
It's a not an academically correct trick :G

kaoslb wrote:
Quote:
The light is on a low setting at this point (~1/8 of full bright), so I'm led to believe that the light is being allowed to overcharge.
hum... it's improbable. The internal capacitor of a flash is always full charged independently of the manual partial power settings (I beleive you are referenced to this ) But I can't be sure 100% since I don't know this particular studio flash.

kaoslb wrote:

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Could it be the pc adapter capacitor is bad?
No. There is no capacitor inside the adapter. And, the adapter"s purpose is to start the flash , not to stop it ( to control the output power)

kaoslb wrote:

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but is there a capacitor in the light that can be replaced? I am confused by the fact that the meter usually gets believable readings.
I seems to me more probable that the light is defective : is there a difference between full and 1/8 power setting?

You can alsoadjust the flash power with a neutral density filter, if there is no other way, or make it bounce far away maybe?


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Old Aug 25, 2005, 2:53 AM   #3
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You do not say what meter you used. Try to beg,borrow or steal a reliable flash meter and check the guide numbers for different power settings, using it in the incident mode.
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Old Aug 30, 2005, 8:17 AM   #4
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A number of things come to mind:

1: The battery in the flash meter is low/failing. Try replacing it.

2: The flash meter is defective. Try another for comparison.

3: The circuit that controls the power level in the flash unit is unreliable. Is the power level set with a slider or a rotatable knob? Maybe the variable controler is corroded. Try moving the control from one end to the other many times. Sometimes this will remove some corrosion and return the unit to more reliable operation.

Finally: is it possible the aperature on the lens you are using is sticking? If the aperature sticks and does not close down properly to the set aperature, then your pictures will be over-exposed.

Hope that helps.

Declan
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Old Oct 17, 2005, 7:34 AM   #5
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Check and see if youhave the auto ISO on. Turn it off if you do as it reads the scene without taking in the flash output.
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Old Nov 22, 2005, 10:17 AM   #6
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excuse me if I'm completely off base here..

You said you have just one light? If so, where in the attached image is it pointed? And where did you point the lightmeter. If you held the lightmeter where the child is, pointing back to the camera, then I'd say it did a good job. That area of the image is more or less correct.

The way to be really sure is to take a picture of a flat subject head on. Point the light at a wall with a picture or something on and use the aperture your meter suggests. The picture should be exposed properly.

At any rate, it's hard for us to understand exactly what's going on with an off-center, 3d shot like this one. By the way, 1/8th power can still be way too much if the light is close. (I use 4 interfit colorflash 300i heads)
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