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Old Jul 7, 2006, 7:45 PM   #1
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Hi everyone I hope this is the right place for this question

I've started modeling for myself lol and shooting my own pictures lol:|

Is it possible to cause any eye damage with those home depot work lights? They are extremely bright and work awesome. Most of the time I use them straight on because sometimes I'm in less then ideal lighting situations.

I guess I never though about researching it before but thought I would ask. I never look straight into them but even then they do shine in your eyes quite a bit.

After taking pictures with this kind of external lighting I don't know how to take pics with out them lol


Sorry if it sounds like a stupid question lol

Thanks




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Old Jul 7, 2006, 11:45 PM   #2
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Msf, a wise person once said, "There are no stupid questions, only stupid answers."

In support of this, I offer the following:

Check with OSHA (the Occupational Safety & Health Administration). They might be able to answer the question easily -- or, it may be the start of a long series of website hops to get something even close to authoritative.

The light manufacturers know that people are going to be working in proximity to these lights for possibly extended times. On the face of it, it doesn't seem that they would sell a product that outputs dangerous spectra -- say, in the UV range. Not, certainly, out of concern for the welfare of the citizenry, but out of fear of legal action in a country where, apparently, personal responsibility and common sense are alien concepts.

But, then -- who knows? Somebody has to be the first one to bring a problem before the public. Maybe you could sue for enough to buy a whole kennel of seeing-eye dogs!

Grant
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Old Jul 7, 2006, 11:53 PM   #3
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Yup I've been website hopping for a bit and couldn't come up with anything concerning eye damage. Theres info about heat and burns but nothing about eyes that i have seen.

Just thought I would ask to make sure.

Thanks for the answer :G
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 9:47 AM   #4
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You didn't say what the wattage is, so I assume 500 to 1000 watts per light. It's bright to look at, but, unless you force yourself to stare into them, I very much doubt they could do eye damage. The sun BTW is significantly brighter than those lights, it's just the dark atmosphere that makes them seem so bright. Take them outside in bright daylight and they will seem positively dim. Your eyes have tremendous lattitude, but in a dark environment they are trying to let you see into the dark.

I also assume they are quartz, and contained behind a glass faceplate. That being the case, there should be little or no UV to worry about. I don't think tungsten filaments give off much (if any) UV anyway and normal glass absorbs UV.

The single biggest problem with those lights is the heat they generate, the caseing can get very hot. So be careful with that after you are finished shooting. Allow them sufficient time to cool off.
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 1:16 PM   #5
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amazingthailand wrote:
Quote:
I also assume they are quartz, and contained behind a glass faceplate. That being the case, there should be little or no UV to worry about. I don't think tungsten filaments give off much (if any) UV anyway and normal glass absorbs UV.
Quote:
Tungsten Halogen lights do produce a significant amount of UV, if operated at rated voltage. In many cases, though, the rated voltage is a bit higher than normal line voltage. If the color temperature is close to that of sunlight, there is some UV in the mix. As you mention, the glass shields do absorb most of this. -A good reason not to operate these lights without the glass covers.
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 5:55 PM   #6
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I think the kind of work lights mentioned are mainly in the 3000 - 3500 Kelvin range, not 5000 to 6000. So I would guess the UV output is quite low. Either way, the glass coverplate is designed to block the UV anyway. I was also reading that today's quartz halogen lamps contain additives to supress the UV.

As mentioned, don't use the lights without the glass coverplate.
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