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-   -   Dragging the shutter? (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/tips-tricks-71/dragging-shutter-205716/)

FaithfulPastor Apr 19, 2013 10:05 AM

Dragging the shutter?
 
I tried to take some photos at night in las vegas. There were lights in the background and I wanted both the person lit, but not overexposed and the background.

Anyway, I must be missing something.

I set my camera for manual mode. I shot at 1/60 second shutter and decreased the output on my external flash to -2.

But the shots were not very good.

What am I missing?

Thanks!

FP

wave01 Apr 19, 2013 10:49 AM

hi i would go for av mode make sure you have the full range set for the flash and then use a tripod as it will put in a slow sync. or take a picture in av mode and see what the camera is setting it up as then put the flash on and try again using those settings. its a bit trial an error sometimes

tclune Apr 19, 2013 10:58 AM

One approach that is sometimes useful is to meter for the background that you want, then adjust to underexpose the results by 2 stops to begin with. Add enough flash to properly expose your foreground subject and adjust either flash or background exposure from there. FWIW

JohnG Apr 19, 2013 11:44 AM

You need to post the photos. Generally speaking a -2 FEC would likely produce a very underexposed subject if the ambient light is well behind the subject.

Without seeing the subjects, my advice to get the best results using TTL are:
1) With manual exposure - set exposure to expose for background
2) Use Flash exposure Lock (FEL) to determine correct flash output - make sure your center focus point is on the FACE during FEL - FEL uses center focus point - not necessarily the focus point for focusing. - then re-compose, focus and take the shot. DONT use any FEC with this method - the FEL will make sure the flash output is correct.
Here is a good read on the subject:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-pho...g-the-shutter/

tclune Apr 19, 2013 5:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnG (Post 1344364)
You need to post the photos. Generally speaking a -2 FEC would likely produce a very underexposed subject if the ambient light is well behind the subject.

Without seeing the subjects, my advice to get the best results using TTL are:
1) With manual exposure - set exposure to expose for background
2) Use Flash exposure Lock (FEL) to determine correct flash output - make sure your center focus point is on the FACE during FEL - FEL uses center focus point - not necessarily the focus point for focusing. - then re-compose, focus and take the shot. DONT use any FEC with this method - the FEL will make sure the flash output is correct.
Here is a good read on the subject:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-pho...g-the-shutter/

Either I failed to say what I meant or you misinterpreted what I said. The photos in your link illustrate exactly what I was proposing -- if you meter for the background, you are going to set the exposure for 1/60, f/5.6 at ISO 400. Back off by two stops, which will give you somewhere around a 1/200 s shutter speed. Looking at the example, that's pretty much the background that I would want for such a photo. Then, use flash to light the foreground figure as you would choose. With all this stuff, I tend to do everything manual because it's a lot easier to control than using +/- EV and then -/+ flash compensation to undo the EC, at least on the Nikon system. I only use TTL if I'm taking a quick you-only-get-one chance shot. Of course, YMMV.

ETA: It finally dawned on me that you were responding to the OP, not me. Sorry for the confusion.

adam agarthar Mar 11, 2015 8:30 AM

there will be feature on your camera as a exposure compensation to control such a things..When you use exposure compensation, you will sooner or later, forget you have it off-center and only realize this after you have shot the photos with improper exposure.

VTphotog Mar 23, 2015 11:02 PM

I see this thread was started a couple years ago, but since people are still commenting, I will toss in my two cents.
Spot meter to obtain proper exposure of the subject, with flash on. If the b/g is too bright, still, use negative exposure compensation in the camera, and, if your camera/flash allow, use positive flash compensation.


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