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-   -   Shooting Wildfires etc (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/tips-tricks-71/shooting-wildfires-etc-131126/)

Photo 5 Oct 22, 2007 8:03 PM

Hi:

Watching these massive CA wildfires on CNN made me think about posting some tips for those of you out there that might want to shoot some images.

I have a background in fire-rescue photography and these are things that have worked for me and my recommendations are based on what I know from the fire side of things

1. DO NOT DO NOT and DO NOT get to close to fire unless you have protective firefighting gear stay backwhen youshoot . Embers jump and the heat can be very hard on the body STAY SAFE. I'd say stay back at least 300 to 500ft

2. I find ISO 200 for scenes with moving/working firefighters to work best shot on Pirority mode with + 1/3 to 2/3. Alsd natural light mode also works great

3. IF shot with D-SLRNEVER NEVER NEVER change a lens in smoke conditions as your sensor will get covered with dust etc. Before you go out use your most versital lens and keep in on the entire time. Also wipe the lese clean every so often

4. Put your largest card in the card slot before you go out so you don't have to open the slot to change cards and risk getting dust into the slot......

5. Flash doesn't work to well when shooting towards a firetruck or firefighters gear... the reflective tape and stripping with blow out your picture. Also in some cases if their is a ton of smoke the flash can make the picture look way worse than a low light image will come out.

6. Try to keep track where you were when you took the pictures..... take a picture of a street sign or town sign etc so you can eidenify when the photos are from in case you try to share them with some one or better with ireport on CNN etc. I use the voice memo mode on my camera and attach a voice memo as to my location when I do pictures at bunch of various locations......

7. Believe it or not wide angle shots seem to have more impact than just trying to capturee one tree on fire or one car on fire........

8. Although it might be hard to plan ahead have asa many spare batteries as possible with you and change them inside your car or a house to keep dust and smoke from getting into the battery slot. Once you get shooting you might find it hard to stop and especially if you start doing video your batteries will go and you may not have access to a charging station for sometime if your on the move.

STAY SAFE

dave

Cyberf828 Nov 30, 2007 10:55 AM

Very good info. I do the same thing for my Dept.

Old Jim Jan 4, 2008 5:27 AM

Although I have read this post a few months after the fact I do have one other piece of advice to offer:

There is no reason for the amature to take photos of a wild land fire except from miles away. These guys have a hard enough job just protecting themselves without having to worry about you.




Calicajun Jan 4, 2008 11:23 AM

Old Jim wrote:
Quote:

Although I have read this post a few months after the fact I do have one other piece of advice to offer:

There is no reason for the amature to take photos of a wild land fire except from miles away. These guys have a hard enough job just protecting themselves without having to worry about you.



I agree with you Old Jim, I use to do scearch and resuce work and it was always a pain in the ... when we had to go back out a look for someone else. The tag alongs would almost always get lost.

Photo 5 Jan 4, 2008 4:09 PM

Yes I agree with what the lasdt two post say



dave

Cyberf828 Jan 8, 2008 7:56 AM

Old Jim wrote:
Quote:

Although I have read this post a few months after the fact I do have one other piece of advice to offer:

There is no reason for the amature to take photos of a wild land fire except from miles away. These guys have a hard enough job just protecting themselves without having to worry about you.




I work for the Fire dept. in my defense.


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