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Old Feb 5, 2007, 12:31 AM   #1
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I may have this in the wrong place if so Please move it.

I notice when I am seeing people shooting candiids such as celeberties they seem to always be using flash even in the daytime. I am not there but it seems to be very well lighted. Does anyone know why that is. I thought if you can go without using flash you should. Am I all messed up? Can someonehelp me out on this? I shoot a lot in the daylight (not people ) and would like to be getting it right.
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Old Feb 5, 2007, 6:43 AM   #2
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People use flash during these times as fill in flash. This lessens the harsh shadows under the eyes, etc. Yeah, it looks strange, but it really does have a positive effect, if your flash is powerful enough. Do a search for "fill in flash" and you'll get plenty of additional reading.
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Old Feb 5, 2007, 10:00 PM   #3
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Ok

I can see that. Now how in the world do I set up my equipment for "fill" flash?

I use a 20D and a Sunpak 383.

I read more and more on the Internet but just go more and more confused.

On my flash I have been setting the Auto setting to match the distance I am shooting. The rest is all up in the air:?I do match the ISO BUT What ISO should I be using. All I have been doing is setting the camera on AV to get my ISO up high enough to get the speed to 250 then I switch to manual and add 2 stops to the camera. Please anyone HELP. I am getting aggravated witht his.
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Old Feb 5, 2007, 11:18 PM   #4
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RP33 wrote:
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Ok

I can see that. Now how in the world do I set up my equipment for "fill" flash?

I use a 20D and a Sunpak 383.

I read more and more on the Internet but just go more and more confused.
Well your life would be a lot easier if you picked up a Canon Speedlite (220EX, 430EX [my choice], 580EX). When used with a 20D, e-TTL II will be in effect and the flash and camera will work all that out for you. You'll just need to point and shoot. Shooting manually with the 383 is a nightmare I think. (I have a 383 and use it off camera on a light stand with an optical slave quite often but would never put it on my XT. The "auto" mode on the 383 isn't much more than a light sensor I think. Not very effective.)
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Old Feb 6, 2007, 1:59 AM   #5
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It can be done for several reasons.



1.
To indeed open up the eye shadows.
2.
To give the twinkle to the eyes.
3.
To make sure you have the shot, flash will freeze the face and often there is alot of movement going on.

For natural looking fill-in flash, set the flash on E-TTLII.
If you want to flash to almost not draw attention set it 1 fstop under your exposure via for example flash compensation.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 4:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
3.
To make sure you have the shot, flash will freeze the face and often there is alot of movement going on.


Why does a flash freeze the situation during daytime? A flash is most often coupled to a 1/60 sec. exposure.
During daytime, you actually have faster shutter speeds than 1/60...
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Old Feb 12, 2007, 9:15 PM   #7
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When you use any flash, the flash exposes the frame instead of the shutter exposing it. The shutter is open for 1/60 but the flash esposes most of the frame in far less time than that. The balance of the time your shutter is open, the frame is still slightly exposing (provided there is ambient light)but the large majority of the frame has already been captured. Think of how a flashing strobe seems to slow down motion, even though your eye is capturing in real time.

You can actually fire the flash at differing times during exposure to create the impression of motion on some SLR's.
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Old Feb 16, 2007, 6:18 AM   #8
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Mercury694 wrote:
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When you use any flash, the flash exposes the frame instead of the shutter exposing it. The shutter is open for 1/60 but the flash esposes most of the frame in far less time than that. The balance of the time your shutter is open, the frame is still slightly exposing (provided there is ambient light)but the large majority of the frame has already been captured. Think of how a flashing strobe seems to slow down motion, even though your eye is capturing in real time.

You can actually fire the flash at differing times during exposure to create the impression of motion on some SLR's.
okay. thanks for the explaination.
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Old Feb 23, 2007, 11:39 PM   #9
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Mercury694 wrote:
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You can actually fire the flash at differing times during exposure to create the impression of motion on some SLR's.
And a great many P&S as well.... usually refered to as "Slow" or "Slow Synch" flash.
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Old Mar 8, 2007, 3:33 PM   #10
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Or "second curtain" flash.
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