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Old Oct 1, 2007, 8:32 PM   #1
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I wanted to take a pole and see what everyone uses to clean there lenses.

I am currently using the HAKUBA lenspen. Is this something good to use?

What is the best way to clean lenses? Solution or no solution? PEN vs. whipes.




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Old Oct 2, 2007, 6:33 AM   #2
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I use distilled water and Q-Tips.

Sometimes I'll add ethyl alcohol, but not often.
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Old Oct 2, 2007, 8:54 AM   #3
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The first thing to do is blow on the lens with some kind of blower - not your breath (Your breath is *VERY* likely to put some mucus on the lens). That does not touch the lens so cannot cause any problem.

Whatever you use as the next step is, it should be gentle. No hard scrubbing. If the stuff you are trying to clean off contains an abrasive particle, you really don't want to grind it into the glass.
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Old Oct 2, 2007, 2:32 PM   #4
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Thanks for all the comments.

Ihave a blower, but bought it to clean my sensor. Using the LENSPEN, I have always used my breath to blow off any dust then use the PEN. I guess luckily I havent seen anything on it after that. So, it sounds like I need to stop blowing, using my breath.

Would you guys reccommend some type of tissue, PEN, microfiber or just a blower/brush combo. Should I use solution or just the tissue?




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Old Oct 2, 2007, 4:37 PM   #5
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Redop13 wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for all the comments.

Ihave a blower, but bought it to clean my sensor. Using the LENSPEN, I have always used my breath to blow off any dust then use the PEN. I guess luckily I havent seen anything on it after that. So, it sounds like I need to stop blowing, using my breath.

Would you guys reccommend some type of tissue, PEN, microfiber or just a blower/brush combo. Should I use solution or just the tissue?
There are people here that confess to using their breath and an old T-Shirt to clean their lenses, with no adverse results, though I'd put that in the category of tempting fate. I recommend that you stay away from paper products. Paper has very fine sharp edges (Ever gotten a paper cut?) that you should probably keep away from your lenses. I'm not a big fan of blower-brushes either, except for ocassional use. The brush can collect dust and debris from one location, and the blower can deposit it on another.

But remember that dust and dirt on a lens has to be really bad before it will affect the image quality.Except in extreme macrophotography, you can't focus onthe objective lens, so dust and dirt will be significantly out of focus to the point that it is invisible. The worst that will happen is that a significant amount of dust and dirt will reduce contrast and brightness.
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Old Jun 8, 2008, 6:06 AM   #6
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Hi redop13,
I have to say that I use on all lenses a UV filter, there are different opinions about this, but in my case - living on the sea and after a beachwalk the lens (filter) is full with salt spray. I find it safest to use a microfiber glass cleaning cloth - the ones you get in the household departments. They are big, but also good to line the bottom of your camera bag.
A college of mine, he has his own cleaning method. Travelling by 4wheeldrive along a rough dusty track he just dumped his Pentax on the car floor (Without bag!) Once we were at the destination he just used his fingers to wipe the dust off the lens!!! I was flabbergasted. Not a way I would recommend.
Cheers finzie
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Old Jun 20, 2008, 11:43 PM   #7
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I use microfiber cloths, cut into six inch squares instead of lens paper. I use a 30 watt soldering iron to cut them so the edges don't keep losing particles of fiber. To do the cutting, place the cloth flat on a flat piece of metal (a cookie sheet will do) or a piece of glass (a framed mirror or picture will work), heat the iron, then cut along a straight-edge with the soldering iron's tip.

Before I start on the lens, I brush it of with a soft, fan-shaped, brush like women use to apply certain powdery makeup. The brush must be washed once in a while to keep it clean. The brush shakes of or at least loosens any gritty stuff on or around the lens. If the lens is too deep in its casing to use the fan-shaped brush, I use an artist's camel-hair paint brush, a small one.

Then I blow by mouth or air sprayer to get rid of any loose particles.

Next Idip a clean Q-Tip intoa mix of glass cleaner I make myself. The formulation is: one part each of distilled water, rubbing alcohol, and sudsy ammonia, The ammonia is buyable at WalMart for about a buck. It must be the "sudsy" type of ammonia.

I lightly wet the lens with the glass cleaner, then quickly dry it off in a circular motion with the first microfiber cloth. You must do this quickly or the alcohol dries.

Finally, I polish the lens lightly with a second microfiber cloth until any streaks are gone.

At first I worried about dissolving the lens coatings, but after about two years of cleaning my eyeglasses (they are coated) and my lenses I cannot notice any damage to the coatings.

This takes much less time to perform than to tell about it. I am pretty fuusy about having clean lenses, and find myself cleaning my eyeglasses every two or three days. I am rather elderly, need lubricating eyedrops two or three times a day, and dry my eyes as best I can, there are usually some minute droplets whisking of my eyelashes. Also, unless I pay particular attention to laving outmy eyes, and cleaning sleep-induced matter frommy eyelids, upon rising in the morning, junk builds up on myeyeglases.

I hope this will help someone else.

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Old Jul 5, 2008, 1:53 AM   #8
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I use a microfiber cloth and the product called ROR. I've been using ROR since the mid 80's and it has cleaned the best for me.

I first use a blower to get the big stuff off of the lens before rubbing on it.

I put a little drop of the fluid on the rough side of the microfiber towel and wipe in a circular pattern from the middle out. Then let it dry. Then use the smooth side of the microfiber towel and do a final wipe.

Tim

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Old Nov 6, 2010, 4:07 PM   #9
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Hi, as a new camera owner and really new to the world of photography, I can not really impart a great deal of knowledge to this subject on the CORRECT way of doing this but I can tell you what has not worked for me yet, hopefully you can learn somethng from this...
1. Do not use the emmersion technique, as it takes way too long to dry! Running through the dishwasher is included in this technique...
2. Use of a chisel, (no matter how much dry tar is on the lense) usually results in some fine scratching of the exterior of the lense surface.
3. Letting the family cat lick it clean has not been approved and will probably void the warrenty. Although as clean as my cat keeps its fur, I was under the impression that it might have been a good idea..
4. using a sand blaster (even a small one), will definately take what ever is stuck to the lense off no matter what, but makes it harder to focus the thing when you are done.
5. Finally trusting it into the capeable hands of your 6 ysar old to handle the task of cleaning it for you may (if given the proper tools), results in a pretty dramatic change in the over all amount of pieces you started with. It usually isn't any cleaner when they are finished either...

Now, I posted this in jest as I have not owned a camera long enough to get it dirty, I hope you can see the humor,
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Old Nov 6, 2010, 9:51 PM   #10
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I haven't tried getting the cat to clean my lenses, and not sure I would want them smelling of tuna anyway. I doubt it would work as the cat never does anything I want it to do anyway.
I will confess to spitting on a lens and wiping it clean with a shirt tail, though.

brian
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