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Old Jan 30, 2008, 9:45 AM   #1
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what are the best settings for shooting water drops when they drip and catching them when they hit the puddle?
Another 'water' question is: how do I catch running water; streams, fountains etc. and capture the movement?
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Old Jan 30, 2008, 9:07 PM   #2
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For the dripping water shots, check these out:

http://www.popphoto.com/howto/2508/y...ter-drops.html

http://hiviz.com/

http://digital-photography-school.co...y-water-drops/

As for how to capture running water, you need to shoot at very long shutter speeds -- at least 1/2 second. The longer the exposure, the smoother the visual effect will be. A bit of trial and error will tell you how long the exposure has to be on a particular shot to get the effect you want.

Because shutter speeds on the order of a few seconds might be neccesary, you have to either shoot scenes under very low light conditions or, more often than not, buy a set of neutral density filters of various strengths. By using these singly or in combination, you can cut down the available light in a normally lit scene so that you can use long exposures without over exposing everything. Even a polarizing filter can be used to add a few stops of exposure, which might be enough in some situations.

Keep in mind that any other movement in the frame will be blurred also, so windy days might be problematic -- unless you like the result. Nothing is a problem unless you think it is!

Grant
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Old Feb 10, 2008, 2:36 AM   #3
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granthagen wrote:
Quote:
For the dripping water shots, check these out:

http://www.popphoto.com/howto/2508/y...ter-drops.html

http://hiviz.com/

http://digital-photography-school.co...y-water-drops/

As for how to capture running water, you need to shoot at very long shutter speeds -- at least 1/2 second. The longer the exposure, the smoother the visual effect will be. A bit of trial and error will tell you how long the exposure has to be on a particular shot to get the effect you want.

Because shutter speeds on the order of a few seconds might be neccesary, you have to either shoot scenes under very low light conditions or, more often than not, buy a set of neutral density filters of various strengths. By using these singly or in combination, you can cut down the available light in a normally lit scene so that you can use long exposures without over exposing everything. Even a polarizing filter can be used to add a few stops of exposure, which might be enough in some situations.

Keep in mind that any other movement in the frame will be blurred also, so windy days might be problematic -- unless you like the result. Nothing is a problem unless you think it is!

Grant: The simplest way is to catch sound to trigger your flash.
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Old Feb 10, 2008, 2:36 AM   #4
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granthagen wrote:
Quote:
For the dripping water shots, check these out:

http://www.popphoto.com/howto/2508/y...ter-drops.html

http://hiviz.com/

http://digital-photography-school.co...y-water-drops/

As for how to capture running water, you need to shoot at very long shutter speeds -- at least 1/2 second. The longer the exposure, the smoother the visual effect will be. A bit of trial and error will tell you how long the exposure has to be on a particular shot to get the effect you want.

Because shutter speeds on the order of a few seconds might be neccesary, you have to either shoot scenes under very low light conditions or, more often than not, buy a set of neutral density filters of various strengths. By using these singly or in combination, you can cut down the available light in a normally lit scene so that you can use long exposures without over exposing everything. Even a polarizing filter can be used to add a few stops of exposure, which might be enough in some situations.

Keep in mind that any other movement in the frame will be blurred also, so windy days might be problematic -- unless you like the result. Nothing is a problem unless you think it is!

Grant: The simplest way is to catch sound to trigger your flash.
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Old Feb 10, 2008, 2:37 AM   #5
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granthagen wrote:
Quote:
For the dripping water shots, check these out:

http://www.popphoto.com/howto/2508/y...ter-drops.html

http://hiviz.com/

http://digital-photography-school.co...y-water-drops/

As for how to capture running water, you need to shoot at very long shutter speeds -- at least 1/2 second. The longer the exposure, the smoother the visual effect will be. A bit of trial and error will tell you how long the exposure has to be on a particular shot to get the effect you want.

Because shutter speeds on the order of a few seconds might be neccesary, you have to either shoot scenes under very low light conditions or, more often than not, buy a set of neutral density filters of various strengths. By using these singly or in combination, you can cut down the available light in a normally lit scene so that you can use long exposures without over exposing everything. Even a polarizing filter can be used to add a few stops of exposure, which might be enough in some situations.

Keep in mind that any other movement in the frame will be blurred also, so windy days might be problematic -- unless you like the result. Nothing is a problem unless you think it is!

Grant: The simplest way is to catch sound to trigger your flash.
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Old Feb 10, 2008, 2:37 AM   #6
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granthagen wrote:
Quote:
For the dripping water shots, check these out:

http://www.popphoto.com/howto/2508/y...ter-drops.html

http://hiviz.com/

http://digital-photography-school.co...y-water-drops/

As for how to capture running water, you need to shoot at very long shutter speeds -- at least 1/2 second. The longer the exposure, the smoother the visual effect will be. A bit of trial and error will tell you how long the exposure has to be on a particular shot to get the effect you want.

Because shutter speeds on the order of a few seconds might be neccesary, you have to either shoot scenes under very low light conditions or, more often than not, buy a set of neutral density filters of various strengths. By using these singly or in combination, you can cut down the available light in a normally lit scene so that you can use long exposures without over exposing everything. Even a polarizing filter can be used to add a few stops of exposure, which might be enough in some situations.

Keep in mind that any other movement in the frame will be blurred also, so windy days might be problematic -- unless you like the result. Nothing is a problem unless you think it is!

Grant: The simplest way is to catch sound to trigger your flash.
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Old Feb 10, 2008, 2:40 AM   #7
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Sorry about that
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Old Jan 6, 2009, 4:10 AM   #8
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Unbelieveable ! ! !

That's awesome !
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Old Aug 15, 2009, 10:45 PM   #9
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awesome
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Old Aug 16, 2009, 1:12 PM   #10
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Waverley Camera Club did a sound triggered flash workship the other day http://wccmonthlynewsletter.blogspot...e-success.html
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