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Old Jun 1, 2009, 8:32 AM   #1
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Default Sunset Tips Needed

Hi All
I am off on the annual family holiday this year to Turkey and really want to improve (which wont be hard) on my sunset and early evening photography.
I am using a 30D and mainly the 17-85 IS kit lens.
I am a great fan of the, wife and kids in the foreground, shot with a beach, sea and sunset in the background sort of style.
I also have the nifty 50 and a 70-200 F4L.
When shooting this style of shot, should I be using any particular filters ?
I have also seen some stunning pictures directly into the sun at much earlier in the day, how are these images obtained.
Any general help, advice and tips would be greatly appreciated.
Many thanks, Neil.
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Old Jun 1, 2009, 6:26 PM   #2
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Hi,
Scott Kelby says in one of is books.
To take a lightmeter reading above the sun & then lock this reading in one of many ways & drop the camerea at the level where you want the Sun to be in the picture.
But experimenting is always a good way to get something else......
Bracketing is another way of taking this kind of picture
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Old Jun 2, 2009, 1:00 AM   #3
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With the setting sun in the background and peoples' faces in the foreground, relying on the camera's pattern metering will often result in silhouettes without any detail in the faces, and overexposed backgrounds. There is too much dynamic range in the lighting for a single exposure to capture, unless the people are close enough for your flash to fill in the details. Check your camera's manual on how to use fill flash. A shoe mount flash will probably be better for this than the on-camera flash.
Bracketing exposures to create a HDR image can work also, but your subjects will have to hold their pose for the bracket sequence, and with kids in the shot this may not be an option.

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Old Jun 2, 2009, 8:14 AM   #4
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Michel
Many thanks for your reply, I will try both methods and buy a couple of extra gB of memory for my experimenting. Would any filters clean up or improve the sky.
regards Neil
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Old Jun 2, 2009, 8:22 AM   #5
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Brian
Keeping still for more than 1 picture, you have obviously never met my lot !
I am not into HDR yet, but have read a bit about this technique and have seen some fantastic results, perhaps I will get into this soon.
I have tried the on camera flash a few times and results were pretty poor. I have recently purchased a used 550EX flash so I will take that away and experiment.
Any other tips would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Neil
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Old Jun 2, 2009, 9:57 PM   #6
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A graduated ND filter can reduce the light from the upper part of the picture, helping with these shots you are trying to get, and the more powerful flash should be a lot better for fill-in.
You should practice in you back yard, using inanimate objects at first, to find the limits of your flash, and the effect of the filter, if you should purchase one. when you think you have the results you want, try your technique on the wife and kids, to find out if shutter speeds, etc., will be adequate.

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Old Jun 3, 2009, 2:24 AM   #7
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Brian
Many thanks again for the benefit of your experience, it is greatly appreciated.
Neil
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Old Jun 3, 2009, 10:25 AM   #8
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Neil,
May be a polarizing filter if you have one.
Have not tested yet on Sunsets because I purchased a polarizing filter only a few months ago.
But surely will this summer.
And of course a tripod always help for sunset pictures
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Old Jun 4, 2009, 7:24 AM   #9
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Michel
Thanks for your reply I have odered a graduated ND and a polarising filter and will experiment as soon as I have them.

Regards, Neil
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Old Jun 13, 2009, 2:43 AM   #10
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another trick, if you can change settings on your camera without moving it, shoot two shots, one of the properly exposed background without the subjects present then one of the properly exposed foreground (the subjects). the backgrounds should stack up perfectly, the only difference being the person in the foreground... takes a bit of photoshop work, but it can be done... its especially good when you're doing extremely long exposures of the background and the subject can't hold still for the time.

my try involved a 30s exposure to get the background and a 1/200 + flash exposure for the subject (which left the background completely black making it very easy to clip the subject out to paste into the background)
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