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Old Sep 23, 2010, 5:45 PM   #1
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Default What settings should I use?

I have a T1i and I can't take sports photos to save my life. I'm trying to take Tae Kwon Do pictures and the kicks and sparring and movement are so fast all of the pictures come out blurry and when I shoot video trying to stop frame by frame, those frames are blurry too. I'm learning photography and could use some help.

Thanks in advance,
MK
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 5:54 PM   #2
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A fast lens would be helpfull of course they are expensive (this can take your all headache- fast lense which has big aperture like f/1.7).

If you use kit lenses like 18-55 or 55-250, it is hard to catch those movement expecialy indoor - hall sports. If you can't buy a lense you can adjust your camera settings.

Shutter Speed - must be short to take those kind of pictures, to make it short you can do followings.

Wide open the aperture - if you use 55-250 that would be f/4 but when you zoom in this will stop down to f/5.6 and etc. and this will increase shutter speed like 1/200 to 1/30

Play with ISO - set them to 1600 or even 3200 , If iso goes up shutter speed will decrease 1/30 to 1/200 this will increase noise in your picture in low light but will help you to catch movements.
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 6:01 PM   #3
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Ah welcome to the joys of indoor sports.

First question, what lenses do you have? Last time I shot TKD it was at an international event so lighting was great, even so with a fast f2.8 lens I was at ISO 3200. I would expect you to be needing something like the Canon 85mm f1.8 to get near the desired speeds.
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 6:04 PM   #4
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This was extremely helpful, both comments. Thanks and fyi, yes, 55-250 Kit.

I will try this tonight during class and post more later.

Thanks again...you're brilliant!

mk
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 6:39 AM   #5
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I'd go shutter priorty and set the shutter to 1/500th.

If there isn't enough light (your camera will warn you), start bumping UP the ISO (sensitivity) until your camera no longer complains.

If your photos are still blurry from movement, then set your shutter speed to 1/1000 th.

The main thing to to eliminate the blur. A fast shutter speed should do it.

If you see any other pro photographers around, ask them what setting they are using. They will probably give you a dirty look, but most photographers are "nice people" so they'll likely tell you their setting, say something nice to you, then turn their back to you and continue shooting. (my experience, anyways).
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 6:57 AM   #6
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Terry's advice is well meant but it's incorrect. You're not going to have enought light to get shutter speeds of 1/500 much less 1/1000 with the lens you're using. What will happen is your photos will turn out way underexposed. That underexposure is a reason sports photographers do not use shutter priority mode.

For indoor sports, a manual exposure is best - that way the exposure doesn't get thrown by the color of the dobok / hogu.
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 9:37 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
Terry's advice is well meant but it's incorrect. You're not going to have enought light to get shutter speeds of 1/500 much less 1/1000 with the lens you're using. What will happen is your photos will turn out way underexposed. That underexposure is a reason sports photographers do not use shutter priority mode.

For indoor sports, a manual exposure is best - that way the exposure doesn't get thrown by the color of the dobok / hogu.
Noobie here. Could you please elaborate a little? I just upgraded to a T2i SLR from a p & s with the plan of taking pictures at my grandson's basketball games this winter.

Thanks, Jim
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 11:27 AM   #8
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Jim - indoor sports is difficult. Lighting is often a lot less to a camera than it is to our eyes. If you want to shoot indoor basketball at HS level or below, you're looking at needing either an f2.8 lens (like a 70-200 2.8) or a lens with a wider aperture (f2.0, 1.8, 1.4). In canon, those lenses do not come in zooms - only fixed focal length lenses. Then there's the question of correct focal length for the distance you're shooting. For example - the excellent 85mm 1.8 lens can be a great choice - but it's got a working range of around 25 feet. That's not very far. There's a lot to it. If you'd like to start a new thread we can talk about what you need. But I don't want to derail this discussion away from the OPs needs - which are slightly different than yours. So, please start a new thread about your specific needs and those of us who shoot basketball can give you some help.
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 12:34 PM   #9
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Could you use a flash? Then is is the duration of the flash (1/1000 sec or less) determines how much motion blur you get.

You could try panning - picking the center of the individual to pan on. The hands and/or feet are likely to still be blurry, but that might be a reasonable effect.
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 11:19 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
Jim - indoor sports is difficult. Lighting is often a lot less to a camera than it is to our eyes. If you want to shoot indoor basketball at HS level or below, you're looking at needing either an f2.8 lens (like a 70-200 2.8) or a lens with a wider aperture (f2.0, 1.8, 1.4). In canon, those lenses do not come in zooms - only fixed focal length lenses. Then there's the question of correct focal length for the distance you're shooting. For example - the excellent 85mm 1.8 lens can be a great choice - but it's got a working range of around 25 feet. That's not very far. There's a lot to it. If you'd like to start a new thread we can talk about what you need. But I don't want to derail this discussion away from the OPs needs - which are slightly different than yours. So, please start a new thread about your specific needs and those of us who shoot basketball can give you some help.
John,

Thank you very much for your response..............you've already given me a lot of info to work with already. I'll get more familiar with my new camera and lenses and will do as you say and start a new thread for my questions.

Jim
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