Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Tips & Tricks

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 19, 2013, 9:05 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 627
Default Dragging the shutter?

I tried to take some photos at night in las vegas. There were lights in the background and I wanted both the person lit, but not overexposed and the background.

Anyway, I must be missing something.

I set my camera for manual mode. I shot at 1/60 second shutter and decreased the output on my external flash to -2.

But the shots were not very good.

What am I missing?

Thanks!

FP
FaithfulPastor is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 19, 2013, 9:49 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
wave01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: North West England
Posts: 1,748
Default

hi i would go for av mode make sure you have the full range set for the flash and then use a tripod as it will put in a slow sync. or take a picture in av mode and see what the camera is setting it up as then put the flash on and try again using those settings. its a bit trial an error sometimes
wave01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2013, 9:58 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,093
Default

One approach that is sometimes useful is to meter for the background that you want, then adjust to underexpose the results by 2 stops to begin with. Add enough flash to properly expose your foreground subject and adjust either flash or background exposure from there. FWIW
tclune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2013, 10:44 AM   #4
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

You need to post the photos. Generally speaking a -2 FEC would likely produce a very underexposed subject if the ambient light is well behind the subject.

Without seeing the subjects, my advice to get the best results using TTL are:
1) With manual exposure - set exposure to expose for background
2) Use Flash exposure Lock (FEL) to determine correct flash output - make sure your center focus point is on the FACE during FEL - FEL uses center focus point - not necessarily the focus point for focusing. - then re-compose, focus and take the shot. DONT use any FEC with this method - the FEL will make sure the flash output is correct.
Here is a good read on the subject:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-pho...g-the-shutter/
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2013, 4:14 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,093
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
You need to post the photos. Generally speaking a -2 FEC would likely produce a very underexposed subject if the ambient light is well behind the subject.

Without seeing the subjects, my advice to get the best results using TTL are:
1) With manual exposure - set exposure to expose for background
2) Use Flash exposure Lock (FEL) to determine correct flash output - make sure your center focus point is on the FACE during FEL - FEL uses center focus point - not necessarily the focus point for focusing. - then re-compose, focus and take the shot. DONT use any FEC with this method - the FEL will make sure the flash output is correct.
Here is a good read on the subject:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-pho...g-the-shutter/
Either I failed to say what I meant or you misinterpreted what I said. The photos in your link illustrate exactly what I was proposing -- if you meter for the background, you are going to set the exposure for 1/60, f/5.6 at ISO 400. Back off by two stops, which will give you somewhere around a 1/200 s shutter speed. Looking at the example, that's pretty much the background that I would want for such a photo. Then, use flash to light the foreground figure as you would choose. With all this stuff, I tend to do everything manual because it's a lot easier to control than using +/- EV and then -/+ flash compensation to undo the EC, at least on the Nikon system. I only use TTL if I'm taking a quick you-only-get-one chance shot. Of course, YMMV.

ETA: It finally dawned on me that you were responding to the OP, not me. Sorry for the confusion.

Last edited by tclune; Apr 19, 2013 at 5:10 PM.
tclune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 11, 2015, 7:30 AM   #6
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 9
Default

there will be feature on your camera as a exposure compensation to control such a things..When you use exposure compensation, you will sooner or later, forget you have it off-center and only realize this after you have shot the photos with improper exposure.
adam agarthar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 23, 2015, 10:02 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,214
Default

I see this thread was started a couple years ago, but since people are still commenting, I will toss in my two cents.
Spot meter to obtain proper exposure of the subject, with flash on. If the b/g is too bright, still, use negative exposure compensation in the camera, and, if your camera/flash allow, use positive flash compensation.
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:29 PM.