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Old Apr 18, 2004, 10:35 PM   #1
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Default Reducing haze in landscape shots

Hi All,

I was wondering if anyone has any tips for reducing haze in landscape shots? I bought a circular polarizer filter as I read somewhere that these can help, but am not noticing a big change, if any. Camera is Coolpix 5700.

I realise I can't get clear pictures through a dust storm, but perhaps there is still some way to get clearer results?

Thanks for any advice,
Paul
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Old Apr 18, 2004, 11:23 PM   #2
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well...sometimes haze adds to the shot....actually for me....haze is good...

but if your trying to shoot animals...or something :-\ ....
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Old Apr 19, 2004, 2:23 AM   #3
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LOL, I agree, it often adds depth and atmosphere to pics and looks great and its good that its there.

But sometimes there is too much, and sometimes, like you've suggested, it detracts from the clarity of a zoomed shot. Thinking about it, it is probably more of a concern in the zoomed case than wide angled shots, but anyway, back to the question, is there a filter or other approach that may help reduce it?

Cheers,
Paul
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Old Apr 19, 2004, 12:27 PM   #4
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Using your photo-editing software, experiment with the Unsharp Mask (USM) using large settings (25 and over) for the radius. Depending on the pic and the nature of the haze, the results can be quite striking.

fenlander
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Old Apr 21, 2004, 11:58 PM   #5
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OK, thanks fenlander I'll look into it.
Cheers,
Paul
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Old Apr 23, 2004, 9:54 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fenlander
Using your photo-editing software, experiment with the Unsharp Mask (USM) using large settings (25 and over) for the radius. Depending on the pic and the nature of the haze, the results can be quite striking.

fenlander
fenlander great tip
Just tried a quick test to see how effective this technique is and the results do indeed look impressive.
I have posted a sample of the tests if anyone is interested at
http://users.eastlink.ca/~derekc/pic/hazetest.htm[/url]
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Old Apr 23, 2004, 5:08 PM   #7
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Deexly, those shots are impressive. Are the effects additive or did you reset between each shot?

I shot some landscapes yesterday using my D100 with 80-300mm zoom and the haze really show up. Otherwise, they are great shots. I will try your technique and see how it works in Paint Shop Pro 7.
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Old Apr 23, 2004, 5:18 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calr
Deexly, those shots are impressive. Are the effects additive or did you reset between each shot?
Calr:
No the adjustments were not progressive, the first image was simply re-processed in Photo Shop for each of the settings. The sample image is actually a small section cropped from a 180 degree panorama I shot overlooking the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia. It was shot on a very hot day and with the ocean close by haze is always a problem in these conditions.

Good luck on your efforts in Paint Shop.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 4:30 PM   #9
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:homey: Hi all

I have long used fenlander`s approach for removing haze. If you keep the amount to no more than about 15 or even as low as 7 or 8 you cam whack up the radius to its full amount and really get rid of haze.


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Old Jun 17, 2004, 4:56 PM   #10
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I use it the way Graham does. I crank the radius up to about 190 and vary the amount – always 17 or below. With a very high radius you don't get sharpening and you don't want to do that until last.

It can sometimes increase the contrast. I always shoot with minimum contrast to get the most dynamic range so it improves most of my shots. It is especially good for shots taken without a lens shade.
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