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Old Jun 24, 2004, 12:30 PM   #1
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Hi

Open your image and go to 100% for easy visualisation.

Create a new blank layer

Set this layer attributes to COLOR (in the layer palette where you see Normal)

Select a brush a bit larger than the fringing you want to remove. (No need to be accurate)

Hold down the Alt Key and using the eyedropper click on the color you want close to the fringing. Release the key and paint away the fringing. Any other fringing of a similar color area needs no further eyedropper selection. If the new color required is different then Alt click again.

Cheers

Graham
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Old Jun 29, 2004, 1:37 AM   #2
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Hi Graham.

I find this method a bit difficult to use, when you have several colortones as background i.e. a shirt with a pattern. On a blue sky however, this method works very well.

Any comments ?




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Old Jun 29, 2004, 3:36 AM   #3
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:homey:Hi Klaus

I haven`t had to try it on such a picture. I`ll create one, try it and let you know.

Cheers

Graham
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Old Jul 5, 2004, 5:47 PM   #4
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I can say that I just used this method on the beak of a flicker (simple situation; black beak edged with purple fringe) and it was very simple and easy to use. Worked great.

What does changing the "layer attribute" (which I think is actually changing the blending mode" to "color" do? This is one of those magic settings on layers that I've wondered about (but I'll admit I haven't researched.)

Eric
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Old Jul 5, 2004, 10:22 PM   #5
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eric s wrote:
Quote:
What does changing the "layer attribute" (which I think is actually changing the blending mode" to "color" do? This is one of those magic settings on layers that I've wondered about (but I'll admit I haven't researched.)
Eric, I hadn't researched it either, but upon seeing this thread I decided to do a google search and came up with the following page (among many others) that describes what the blend modes are all about:

http://photoshopgurus.info/beginners...nd_modes.shtml
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Old Jul 6, 2004, 7:53 AM   #6
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I'm opening that up in a separate window, so I'll read it soon. Thanks geoffs!

I did a google search on how to remove purple fringing. One suggested using hue/saturation, but only selecting the blue channel. Then you use the eye dropped to pick the color (which can, in fact, change the color channel chosen.) And start to change things. Here is the writeup, which says it much better than I did from memory:

http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/index....pid;1585691688

I found the results of this to be mixed. It did reduce the fringing, but it didn't do as good a job as I would have liked (where the paint method did a good job, but didn't work across the entire picture.)

Eric
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Old Jul 6, 2004, 8:34 AM   #7
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:homey: Hi Guys

My method does require some reselection of color. As purple fringing only occurs in high contrast parts of the image you select with the eyedropper the appropriate color near the fringing and then paint it out. If any other fringing requires the same or near similar color then no need to reselect but if there is a noticeable difference of color next to the fringing then reselect with the eyedropper. I have found that this works well and is so easy to use. If Klaus would send me an image of the colored shirt so that I can experiment I would be grateful. You can send it via my WebSite www.Fotomanweb.co.uk. There is a contact button on it.

Cheers

Graham
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Old Jul 8, 2004, 4:41 AM   #8
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A similar thing that can be really cool is to adda layer with the color mode and use a grey color to turn the image black and white. The beauty of this is that you can keep parts of it color. Another option is to black and white the whole picture and use a new layer with color to color certain parts.

Here is a pic using the first method. I was at Quincy Market in Massachussetts.

[img]file:///C:/All%20The%20Cool%20Stuff%20From%20The%20Mind%20Of% 20Mike/My%20Pictures/postables/bos_5_2.jpg[/img]
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Old Jul 8, 2004, 4:42 AM   #9
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This is the second method.

Hope you like them!

[img]file:///C:/All%20The%20Cool%20Stuff%20From%20The%20Mind%20Of% 20Mike/My%20Pictures/postables/bos_27_2.jpg[/img]

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Old Jul 27, 2004, 10:28 AM   #10
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I dont know if this was adressed yet but a method I have used is under the saturation menu in photoshop. You dont use the master control but the purple I believe and turn it down to like -80. It worked well for me
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