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Old Feb 8, 2005, 8:25 PM   #1
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I have a Canon A75 with no special lenses or anything else like that and I tried to take some pictures of some electrical components but the pictures came out very blurry. I tried my best to not make the pictures blurry but they always came out blurry. If I get closer to the circuit board, the picture just ends up getting COMPLETLY blurry. I used the best picture settings without Flash because flash doesn't work well with electrical components because of the glare. Here are the pictures that I ended up getting:




Any tips?
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 8:37 PM   #2
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One, you two images are taken at f3.5 and at f4, try manually setting the aperture as small as possible (f7 - f8, not sure how small the a75 can go) to increase the Depth of Field. This will make you shutter speed very slow, so you will need good strong light and something to support the camera.

Peter.
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 8:58 PM   #3
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I'm assuming that that is done by going into the "manual" mode (The pictures were takin in AUTO mode). Whenever I go to the manual mode the whole picture is REALLY dark. When I press to take a picture, the brightness goes back to normal and I can see everything again but after the beeping for focusing and what not, it goes back to the dark screen. It even takes the picture as really dark. I found out that I could change the brightness by changing some strange option that was under the flash power; this strange option can be anything something like 1" or 1/125. What should I change this to to make it back to normal?
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 9:05 PM   #4
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That sounds suspiciously like your shutter speed, 1" is one second, 1/125 is 1/125th of a second. The longer the shutter is open the more light will enter the camera. The required setting is dependent on how much light is available where you are taking the picture, guessing at a speedis not really possible.

Peter.

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something like 1" or 1/125
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Old Feb 9, 2005, 1:06 AM   #5
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1. get parallel with the box.

2. use the MACRO mode on the camera (the flower button).

3. use a tripod.

4.place a piece of white paper at a 45 degree angle between the flash and the subject.

5. manual mode is recommended, though Tv and Av mode may work if you know how to use them (read the manual).

6. keep trying.



In general: you are fighting depth of field and glare. Use the widest lens setting you have. You need to maximize the focal plane to your advantage. Get parallel to the circuit board. Use the maximum aperture you can achieve - f8 or f11 or higher. Once you get the focal plains aligned (camera and subject), then start worrying about light. Use lots of it - and flash isn't the best choice here. Use two bright incandescents, one on each side of the camera.

Make sure the flash and exposure compensation settings areat +/-0 (center of range). If using the two 100w incandescent lamps, use the incandescent white balance.


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Old Feb 9, 2005, 2:55 PM   #6
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As you can imagine I am a bit of a macro expert after years of taking our product photos for the camera reviews. The secrets to great macro shots are:
  1. Use a tripod - always! Your shutter speed will be very slow...[/*]
  2. Use "A"perture priority, stop down to minimum f/stop (largest number)[/*]
  3. Use two or more light sources, flexible table lamps are good[/*]
  4. Manually set white balance with gray card or white paper[/*]
  5. Use the self-timer or remote shutter release - always![/*]
  6. On-camera flash is a no-no, too many reflections and shadows[/*]
  7. Practice, practice, practice ...[/*]
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 10:40 AM   #7
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Good tips here.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Don't they make a "ring" flash that might be useful, if you wanted to spend the money?
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 12:08 PM   #8
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Wannabe wrote:
Quote:
Don't they make a "ring" flash that might be useful, if you wanted to spend the money?

It would be nearly impossible to get a ring flash to work correctly with his camera (Canon A75). The best lighting will be realized using small and easily directed table lamps. Been there, done that!
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 12:08 PM   #9
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A cheap copy stand with two light sources that are flexible would be an easy way.

TG
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 9:07 PM   #10
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close up add on lenses may help too (cokin or equivalent)

http://www.pbase.com/kcan/di7_macro
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