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Old May 4, 2005, 8:06 AM   #1
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I am having trouble getting good shots of my snow globes, you know, those glass balls filled with water and snow and some scene.

I am using a Digital Rebel XT and a macro lense. My issue is lighting. I can't get a shot without the reflection of the camera in it. Usually, with shiny objects, if you just alter the lighting a bit or shoot from a slight angle, you can avoid reflections. But, these globes are spheres, so anywhere you shoot from there is a reflection.

Any ideas? Anyone done this successfully?
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Old May 4, 2005, 4:16 PM   #2
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A couple things you might try--no guarantees! Try a polarizing filter to see it helps remove the reflection. Since the globe is spherical, it may not help at all. Second, use something like a bedsheet or other white cloth in front of the light to diffuse it. If you are using an external flash with a tiltable head, point the flash toward the ceiling. If your camera has a built-in flash, you might try holding a small mirror directly in front at a 45-degree angle to reflect the light toward the ceiling. You'll definitely need a tripod to try this.

The last suggestion is a brainstorm that just popped into my head. I have never tried it and I don't know if it will work. The light will definitely be reflected toward the ceiling but I don't know how the metering will react to it.

Good luck to you.

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Old May 5, 2005, 8:33 AM   #3
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Thanks, I'd tried all of those except for a lens filter. I'll stop by my camera store and give it a try.
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 9:13 PM   #4
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It's just a thought but... stacking two polarizers might work. You would have to turn one to block horizontally and the other vertically. The problem that might occur would be with bright enough light. It's a thought... never tried it myself but it might take the glare off.

If you have two of different sizes you can hold them up to a bright light source and turn them at the same time while holding them in front of each other and see what it does.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 1:25 PM   #5
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There is a potential problem with stacked polarizing filters. If the filters are designed properly and working properly, and you rotate one ninety degrees from the other, they shoudl block out ALL light. However, I don't think circular polarizers are that good!

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Old Jun 7, 2005, 8:48 AM   #6
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calr wrote:
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There is a potential problem with stacked polarizing filters. If the filters are designed properly and working properly, and you rotate one ninety degrees from the other, they shoudl block out ALL light. However, I don't think circular polarizers are that good!

Cal Rasmussen

Yes, I should have been a bit more specific. I was thinking of circular polarizers. I'm bad.
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Old Jun 8, 2005, 8:46 PM   #7
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Here's where I am so far (disregard the background, etc...this is only for my testing purposes). I think if I use a polarizing filter it should work pretty well (don't have one for my new lens yet). And, I'm a bit close, so the flash reflection is quite harsh.


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Old Jun 27, 2005, 9:38 AM   #8
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I'm not a lighting expert at all but how about this? Turn off the lights in the room and use a spot light or bright desk lamp to backlight the globe. Set the spotlight to be between 120° to 135° from the angle of the camera to the globe.

Enjoy life!
Steven
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