Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Tips & Tricks

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 7, 2005, 4:26 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

Hi,
Just went for a holiday, a distant family giving birth, n i took many photos, but as it's in hospital n taking new born baby, i didnt use the flash. But the results are no good, as most of the shots are blurred.
I notice that at nights its best to use tripods to take shots with the non flash. But occasionally i tried non-flash at day times and it works...cos i like the colours better without flash.
The problem is how do i take shots (non flash) at places like hospital, museum and such where flash is not really permitted and while travelling when bringing tripod is not convenient?

Please kindly teach me..as im getting frustrated trying different methods but no results..:sad:

ps, im using konica minolta X50 at the moment, and im thinking to upgrading to another camera. BUT do you think is the camera no good or just simply me?
ps2, is there any camera with the anti-shake while making non-flash shots?

Many thanks in advance
junior is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 8, 2005, 12:29 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Carskick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 276
Default

Set your sensitivity (ISO) to 400. This will increace digital noise, but will make the camera more sensitive to light, thus the shutter won't need to be open as long to capture enough light to develop a photo. When the shutter is not open as long, you are less likely to blur via camera shake.
Carskick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2005, 8:03 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

First get an EXIF reader so you can find out what shutter speed and focal length combination causes the problem for you. The old "rule of thumb" is that you need a shutter speed of at least 1/focal length (equiv), e.g., with a focal length of 50mm (equiv), you want to shoot at 1/50th sec or faster to avoid shake. Some folks are steadier at hand-holding so might be able to shoot at 1/25th @50mm. Practice and doing things like leaning against a wall while shooting will help a lot.

I don't have image stabalizing, but the manfacturers claim a 3 stop improvement, and the consensus of users seems to be closer to 2 stops. Assuming you can shoot at 1/focal length, a two stop improvemnent should allow you to shoot at 1/4xfocal length, e.g., 1/12th sec at 48mm.

As Carskick noted, increasing your ISO will help. Going from ISO 100 to 400 will give a two stop increase in shutter speed - at the cost of increased noise.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2005, 3:46 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 52
Default

Shooting without flash in low light is a challange to do well, but with the right tools and / or skills (ie settings on camera with technique) you can do a good job. Flash, although wonderful, doesn't always give you the results you want.

If your camera has custom white balance ability, learn how to use that. Even though the camera on auto white balance will determine which is the best setting, it usually does not do a great job in artifical lighting situations, especially fluorescents or industrial lighting environments. The difference can be amazing.

Play with your ISO settings. If your shutter speeds are slow (see above message) you are bound to get blur. Things you can do to improve slow shutter speed shots are: 1) use image stabilization technology (great if you have it, if you don't you're out of luck) 2) use a tripod (same note) 3)find something to brace your camera against (the more steady you can make yourself, the less your camera will move), 4) learn how to hold your camera in a firmer manner (arms out full length is pretty much guaranteed to cause blur, try using the viewfinder with elbows tucked in by ribs) and 5) take multiple shots knowing a percentage will be blurry.

If you do all of the above and are still having problems, then you have to consider using tripods, flash, or ugrading to a digital slr where the noise produced from high ISO shots is much less (has to do with size of sensor chip and signal to noise ratio).

Hope this helps.

www.ericspix.com


ericsvendsen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 8, 2005, 6:00 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default

The other responses are excellent. I would add that you might buy a small tripod -- about 8" -- sometimes they are called handipods or something like that. Connect it to your camera and brace it against your chest.
pingree35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2005, 1:46 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

Hi guys,
thanks for the inputs, i'd tried shooting with iso400 and yes it is much better, i realize when the iso is auto, it takes a while to analyse the photo, but when the iso400 is set, it takes lesser time, though i still have to practise the firm hand technique.

Btw, about the shutter speed, i think my camera is auto and i can't find in the setting to increase or decrease the shutter speed. It's Konica Minolta X50, i think it's a compact digicam.

thanks once again guys
junior is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2005, 1:57 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

ericsvendsen wrote:
Quote:
If your camera has custom white balance ability, learn how to use that. Even though the camera on auto white balance will determine which is the best setting, it usually does not do a great job in artifical lighting situations, especially fluorescents or industrial lighting environments. The difference can be amazing.

So may i know which colour is best when using w/o flash? in my camera there are auto, daylight,cloudy,tungsten, fluoresnt?

Play with your ISO settings. If your shutter speeds are slow (see above message) you are bound to get blur. Things you can do to improve slow shutter speed shots are: 1) use image stabilization technology (great if you have it, if you don't you're out of luck)

May I know what is image stabilization tech?

If you do all of the above and are still having problems, then you have to consider using tripods, flash, or ugrading to a digital slr where the noise produced from high ISO shots is much less (has to do with size of sensor chip and signal to noise ratio).

How about anti-shake digicam or slr? i was told there are available? is there really such a camera?

Hope this helps.

www.ericspix.com


thanks heaps
junior is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 16, 2005, 3:17 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 29
Default

junior wrote:
Quote:
Hi,
Just went for a holiday, a distant family giving birth, n i took many photos, but as it's in hospital n taking new born baby, i didnt use the flash. But the results are no good, as most of the shots are blurred.
I notice that at nights its best to use tripods to take shots with the non flash. But occasionally i tried non-flash at day times and it works...cos i like the colours better without flash.
The problem is how do i take shots (non flash) at places like hospital, museum and such where flash is not really permitted and while travelling when bringing tripod is not convenient?

Please kindly teach me..as im getting frustrated trying different methods but no results..:sad:

ps, im using konica minolta X50 at the moment, and im thinking to upgrading to another camera. BUT do you think is the camera no good or just simply me?
ps2, is there any camera with the anti-shake while making non-flash shots?

Many thanks in advance
I had the same problem...

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=9

Hope that helps
Kujila is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 21, 2005, 5:45 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 59
Default

Part of the problem is that many people cannot hold a camera steady very well. In addition to the innate movement of the human muscle tissue under load, a lot of people can't hold the camera steady as they push the shutter.

As someone who has shot handguns extensively, most of the principles from handgun marksmanship apply to digital cameras as well. Frankly, I think people who shoot handguns well are able to hold cameras steadier than most people.

There's really no substitute for practice, but here are a few pointers that may help you:

1. If possible, rest the camera against something, or if possible have your bones supporting it instead of your muscles. The more muscle support, the more tremor. You can rest your elbows on other bones in your body (ie, your knees if you are crouching) if you cannot find a surface upon which to rest the camera.

2. This is where most people screw up; pressing the shutter release. The thing is, when most people press this, they jerk the camera as they not only use the muscles needed to push the shutter but also tighten their grip and/or use other nearby muscles without realizing it which shifts the camera's position during the exposure. Concentrate on ONLY using the muscle groups needed for depressing the shutter, do not use extraneous muscles or tighten your grip.

A good trick many people shooting handguns use to learn good trigger control is to place a dime on top of the handgun and dry fire it. (ie, without a bullet in the chamber)

If you do your part, the dime should not move. If you mess up, the dime will fall off. Most of my sister's pictures are blurry, even outdoor shots. When I had her put a dime on the camera, she seemed surprised as it fell off every time. That can't be good for the exposure.

3. Holding your breath while taking the shot will help lessen movement of your body. However, it's important to note that if you do this for more than a brief period your muscles will become extra fatigued, so you must allow for breaks for this to work effectively.

4. Pay extra attention either through the viewfinder or the LCD that the camera does not shift position or move. With handguns we call this "front sight focus"; ie, you focus on the object you are holding rather than the target.

Additionally, you can also increase the ISO, use a tripod, etc, as many posters have stated-- but there is no substitute for learning a steady hold and proper muscle movement during the shot.

I hope this helps. Remember -- make sure you hold the camera steady, don't jerk it when you push the shutter release, and rest it if possible.

Good luck, and practice practice practice.
Frangible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2005, 6:15 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
pianoplayer88key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 405
Default

What do you do using a Canon S1 IS when you can't use the flash or get close to the subjects (and you don't want to alert them to the fact that you have a camera), and you're already at ISO 400 and F/3.1, and you want less image noise, AND the subjects are moving a lot (enough to blur at 1/40") but you can handhold at 1/8" at 380mm (I can), and you're shooting a moonlit scene at a distance of 50 feet and you don't have time to move closer?
pianoplayer88key is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:53 AM.