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Old Jun 13, 2005, 11:30 AM   #1
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This week I'm getting the Sony p200, I'll be going on vacation in a few weeks and will be shooting lots of pictures. I was wondering how good are the preset modes on these cameras? Is it wise to use these modes like the beach scene, landscape etc or are you better of playing w/ the settings? I'm far from an expert so im not to sure if messing w/ the ISO and other settings would be wise. Does anyone have any tips on certain settings for shooting your basic scenary on an island? Such as the sunset, water, gardens etc.

thanx in advance!
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Old Jun 13, 2005, 12:49 PM   #2
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joey d wrote:
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I was wondering how good are the preset modes on these cameras? Is it wise to use these modes like the beach scene, landscape etc
IMO, in general, preset are fine, except for unusual situations, and you just name one: beach scene, where background is often verybright and tends to make the subject underexposed (because it,s based on theaverage metering). Switch to spot metering (spot on subject) or somekind of more inteligent mode if the camera has it.
In beach scene , fill in flash is also an option (subject is under shadow for example)
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Old Jun 14, 2005, 7:53 PM   #3
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I tend to agree with KCan but check your owners manual and see what the camera sets as the default ISO in the various modes. On my Fuji S5100, the default is 100. Down here in the sunny South, I lock mine in on 64 for outdoor shots and flip between Auto and Apeture Priority. AP (or other manual settings)lets me set the EV comp down a notch or two for bright subjects/areas. Ialso have more control over the DOF with just a single setting.

The automatic settings are generally very good but don't rely on them for special circumstances. Spend the time to read your manual and take a lot of practice shots using the various settings. Experiment with your camera so you know how it will respond in bright sun, shade, flash and auto settings. What's great about practice shots is that you can review the results immediately and make notes and/or delete them.


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Old Jul 25, 2005, 2:55 PM   #4
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Even as a serious amateur photographer, I use preset modes when I'm not doing "serious shooting".

I use "fill flash" a lot on subjects 10-30 feet away.


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Old Jul 25, 2005, 6:55 PM   #5
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joey d wrote:
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This week I'm getting the Sony p200, I'll be going on vacation in a few weeks and will be shooting lots of pictures. ...
Do a LOT of shooting in the next few weeks in lots of different situations and find out what works.If it doesn't come with the camera software, get an EXIF reader so you can see what the camera is doing with each shot, e.g., mode, shutter speed, f/stop, white balance, ... Get some prints of those shots so you can see what they look like on paper and not just on the computer screen.

You are cutting a bit close in terms of the time you have to learn how to use the camera before your vacation. It does take time to become comfortable with a camera.
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Old Jul 29, 2005, 10:11 PM   #6
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My A75 under-exposes a bit in beach scene and I find the photos to come out much better when I raise exposure compensation to +1.
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Old Oct 12, 2005, 1:08 PM   #7
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Hey.

There is one thing I can tell you... you mentioned ISO... keep it as LOW as possible. The higher ISO sensitivity you go, the more noise (grainy gritty stuff) will appear in the photo. The only time I make the ISO higher is when I can't use the flash at all (higher ISO makes the camera more sensitive to light and brightens your photos)... sometimesto complement the flash in a low-light situation, or to help with freezing action, but I still try to keep it as low as possible, because noise is ugly and ruins photos.

If you don't have the time/interest to be messing around with manual settings, it's probably best to get a camera that has scene modes. I need a camera that is fully manual, but I also wouldn't go without auto mode & scene modes, they're quick, easy, and your photo usually comes out looking fine. If you want scene modes, but also want more control and creativity, get one that has some manual settings as well. I think the camera you're planning on getting has scene modes and some manual features... can't remember. Manual features can take some time to figure out, though...
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Old Mar 13, 2006, 8:09 AM   #8
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fill flash - what is it? :?
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Old Mar 13, 2006, 12:08 PM   #9
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Using flash to lighten shadows in conditions where there is enough light for an exposure without flash.

Very useful for exposing faces in portraits outdoors where the face may come out dark because the background is very bright and the metre will tend to underexpose the face.


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