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Old Dec 2, 2005, 5:32 PM   #1
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I really appreciate your tips or ideas to improve this type of photography...i love sunsets, every day is difeerent from the day before, there is no duplicates!...with digital cameras we have the problem of the direct sunlight over the CCD...and sometimes EV correction does not have a good effect...bye
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Old Dec 3, 2005, 1:52 AM   #2
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I use spot focus when using my FZ5. There is no harm to the CCD, atleast I haven't seen any case where CCD got fried taking sunset shots.
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Old Dec 3, 2005, 2:13 AM   #3
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I'd say your photo is pretty good. :lol: Keep up the good work.
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Old Dec 3, 2005, 11:20 AM   #4
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bobbyz wrote:
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There is no harm to the CCD, atleast I haven't seen any case where CCD got fried taking sunset shots.
Yep, sun near horizon doesn't have very strong radiation.
Radiation has to go though much thicker air column so radiation is much weaker... Although I don't know how well IR penetrates atmosphere, longer wavelength radiation (red color) can get through thicker air so some IR radiation might get through when sun is low.

On the other hand most digicams have IR filters in front of CCD so heat radiation itself don't get to sensor but radiation could still "burn" this filter if it's let to be heated longer.
After all camera's lens works little like magnifying glass and focuses radiation to certain point where radiation density can grow considerably.


But I wouldn't consider pointing camera towards sun even at day dangerous unless you'll keep it pointed longer time.



Make sure you have good wide angle, this was taken with 28mm+0.8x wide converter. (~22.5mm)


Remnant of Cumulonimbus Incus
Solar rays/cloud's shadow
Winter sunrise with sun pillar
No, not a nuclear explosion

Few sunsets more 1, 2, 3
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Old Dec 3, 2005, 5:14 PM   #5
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I've taken some pretty nice sunsets with my FZ20's warming filter. It really brings out the oranges and yellows. I took the attached photo one evening last July shortly after the sun disappeared behind these hills. As you can see, the greatest drawback on this evening was that there were no clouds to add texture and reflections.
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Old Dec 3, 2005, 5:43 PM   #6
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If you are using Photoshop or another editor that will let you convert your RGB image into the LAB color space you can do some very easy adjustments in LAB that produce results that no other color space can duplicate. LAB allows you increase color saturation independantly from the luminescence and to also seperate and define colors in a way that RBG can't.
This works really well on sunsets. There is a tutorial on the basic method called: Give Your Photos a Velvia Touch. I think it can be found on: www.thelightsrightstudio.com.
Something else I've found useful is to set your camera up on a tripod and take several shots of the same scene at different exposures to capture a wider dynamic range and then blend them together in post processing. You can use the auto-bracketing function of your camera to do this, or set it to aperture priority mode and vary the exposure manually. There are numerous tutorials on the Internet that tell you how to do the blending. You can adapt the information to do this on most good editors.
Have fun!
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Old Dec 4, 2005, 1:28 AM   #7
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Thanks to all for the recomendations, photos and tips...specially to Grant for the URL, the rest is by my side...bye and Merry Christmas to all.
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Old Dec 16, 2005, 11:30 AM   #8
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I use the center wigthed metering, and fast up the shutter 2/3 EV.

In this case, the camera metering said f11 & 1/100, I used f11 & 1/160, manual mode.

This is specific to my Pana FZ-30. Probably it will be sligth different in other models/brand, but try "darkenning" a little bit than measured. This will pop up the oranges.


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Old Dec 16, 2005, 12:45 PM   #9
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The best way to get the best sunset images is to take two pictures, one exposed for the sky and one exposed for the ground/foreground and blend them together.


Edit: someone mentioned this already, so count me as being in agreement with them
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Old Mar 13, 2006, 8:36 AM   #10
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bobbyz wrote:what is spot focus ? :?
Quote:
I use spot focus when using my FZ5. There is no harm to the CCD, atleast I haven't seen any case where CCD got fried taking sunset shots."
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