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Old Jan 3, 2006, 11:15 PM   #11
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Use whatever is around you to rest your camera on.

Use a car door, a mailbox, a fire hydrant - whatever is around and is steadier than you - it will be better than nothing.
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 2:19 PM   #12
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Thought that you might like to know that there is a small "pocketable" tripod. In fact I have one which is made by Haiser. It measures 6" high with legs installed and 5½" without. Legs are stored within the unit. It can attach to your car window or any object that is no thicker than 1½".
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 3:49 PM   #13
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I had one like that once, didn't have the clamp though. But the legs popped out of the base, unopened it served as a handle. The one I have now is a regular tripod in mini-minature. :-)

By the way your avatar looks like the camera I started taking pictures with, only my lens was not as large.
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 4:02 PM   #14
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[align=center]:bye:Hi Steve40 - that was my first camera that I purchased in the early 50's. Paid $50 for that Voigtlander. It was a good camera.[/align]

[align=center][/align]
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 4:34 PM   #15
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Kanon wrote:
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[align=center]:bye:Hi Steve40 - that was my first camera that I purchased in the early 50's. Paid 450 for that Voigtlander. It was a good camera.[/align]

[align=center][/align]
That was when they made them from real metal. :-)That's not quite as old as mine was. Mine was a Kodak 620, vintage 1938 or there-abouts. It had been in the family, a couple of years longer than I had. I had an airplane thing then, I must have took hundreds of pictures with that old camera. It had 3 shutter speeds, and 3 f-stops, as well asI can remember. Of course back then I shot at 1/50 @ F-11, that was the sunny 16 rule of those days. Fast film was around 50 ASA, especially 620. But I guess you remember that. :-)
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 4:48 PM   #16
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:bye:I bought that camera as USED. Really don't know in what year it was made. Sometime back in the 80's I was upgrading my 35mm camera and also decided to trade in the Voigtlander. My camera place gave me $75 - $100. Don't recall exactly. I tend to trade things in. I know one takes a beating on the price but its not doing me any good sitting on the shelf in the closet. It was a great camera however, extra care had to be given to advoid damage to the bellows.


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Old Jan 5, 2006, 6:16 PM   #17
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Kanon wrote:
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:bye:I bought that camera as USED. Really don't know in what year it was made. Sometime back in the 80's I was upgrading my 35mm camera and also decided to trade in the Voigtlander. My camera place gave me $75 - $100. Don't recall exactly. I tend to trade things in. I know one takes a beating on the price but its not doing me any good sitting on the shelf in the closet. It was a great camera however, extra care had to be given to advoid damage to the bellows.

That one looks as if it might be a range-finder from here, judging from the number of windows on it. The old Kodak had a sliding scale, as you pulled out the bellows for zone focusing.

That's what happend to the Kodak, it blew the bellows in a seam finally. I also had a Ikonflex 35MM with a bellows somewhat late on, around 62-63 I think. Don't even remember what happened to it, lost it moving I think.
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Old Jan 6, 2006, 6:27 PM   #18
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I recently went out at night with my Panasonic FZ30 to see how well I could capture some low light scenes without the use of a tripod. If you have a camera with stablization, check out my post in the Panasonic forum and see if my technique is useful to you. I suppose it should also be somewhat useful for cameras without stabilization, but I really couldn't say for sure.

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=23
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 9:59 PM   #19
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this is a tripod from my old webcam.. luckily it has the same standard bolt for all cameras.. sorry about the pic, it was taken with a cell-cam.


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Old Jan 21, 2006, 6:52 AM   #20
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Hi Terry!

Nice advise...NOW I will always use my Oldie Linhof 30 years monopod...to beware from Dogs and others animals..during day & night...thanks for remember me such use!!!

Now I use my digitally KM 7D with this superb Slick Chest/table small tripod...amazing results!. My monopod rest for the moment!.

Cheers,

ALEX 007:|
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