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Old Dec 25, 2005, 8:25 PM   #1
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like most of the world, those special moments sometimes happen at night, when your out roaming the world in its dark settings. and of course, you dont always carry a pocket-sized tripod with you (because they dont exist.) so what tips do u guys have for taking shots at night with OUT a tripod, and nothing but your body and a few seconds to capture a shot.:?
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Old Dec 26, 2005, 11:19 AM   #2
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Hold your breath, brace your arms against your chest, and every so gently squuueez the shutter button. All of this will probably still get you an out of focus blurred picture ---- But hey! we tried. :-)
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Old Dec 29, 2005, 7:40 PM   #3
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YOu could purchase a monopod, which is a one legged tripod.

Use the monopod to defend yourself against wayward dogs, rats and beggars at night and you'll be all set.

-- Terry
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Old Dec 30, 2005, 7:23 PM   #4
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This was raised here before,and the solution was to carry two lengths of string and a 1/4 x 3/4 inch bolt and then screw the bolt into the base of camera where the tripod screws,tie both strings to the bolt and the other ends to a stick on the ground and stand on it ,pull upwards to hold the camera still.
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Old Dec 30, 2005, 9:39 PM   #5
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Blimey Terry !!

Live in a rough part of town then :shock:.
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Old Dec 31, 2005, 12:19 AM   #6
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That's really a good way to pull the plastic tripod socket apart, that most digital cameras have. :-?
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Old Dec 31, 2005, 7:00 PM   #7
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Shooting a camera is very much like shooting a gun - use as stable a position as possible, and take advantage of any buildings, trees or other objects to brace against. I have gotten decent shots at shutter speeds of as slow as 1/2 second this way. Get into a comfortable position, breathe deeply, and as you start to exhale, hold it and get your picture.

Best thing to use is a tripod, of course, next is a monopod, third is a pocket tripod (a minipod type) which , I assure you do exist - I have used one for about thirty years.

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Old Jan 3, 2006, 12:23 AM   #8
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I've seen mini tripods, little ones that you could set on the ground, or on a coffee table if you're indoors. A friend told me that the mini tripod can help even if you don't have somewhere to set the camera down. Holding it might add an element of stability, as opposed to just holding the camera by itself (but I haven't tried that).

Another idea might be to use thecamera's timer (most cameras have a relatively short duration, anywhere between 2 and 10 seconds).Set the timer and then do your best to hold the camera steady. This would eliminate the movement of squeezing/pressing the button to snap the photo. You'll likely get some blur, but it might be just enough to look as though it was intentional.

I've managed to take a few cool night shots just by setting my camera on the roof of whatever car happened to be parked in the street. Of course I've never had to explain this toany of the owners and I try not to pick Porches and the like, where someonemight throw a tantrum if they caught me. The timer works especially well in this scenario. I got an excellent shot of a 19th century home this way just last week.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 2:53 AM   #9
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I have one of those little guys, all of 5 1/4 inches high with a mini ball head. It even has the name brand of Nikon, it works pretty good on top of almost anything. You want the camera on level though, the foot print is to small to remain up-right, if the camera is tilted very much. Holding it unopened works like a pistol grip, and will provide a mild increase in steadiness.

Of course it also is for the smaller cameras, not for long lens jobs. :-)
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 6:57 AM   #10
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You could also try a bean bag or Bean Pod.

Many have improvised with a suitable 'bag' filled with rice, packed in tightly,(uncooked ).

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